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I embrace the term "Polak" or "Pollack" in the US


Wariat 2 | 12
10 Dec 2013 #1
Anyone beside me started embracing this term to differentiate ourselves from American whites? I felt so secluded, so different, so unwanted growing up here in a california and so at home so happy and free everytime I visited my land I was raised in (however now I have no one left there to go back to) that to me being called a Pollock or Pollack is a sign of pride. It is a sign I don't and never will belong in white America but come from a warrior culture and the streets. Anyone feel the same? I think everyone needs to be around their own people. Look at the Achinese and achinatowns they create or cities they fill up, look at mexicans, blacks, etc. everyone needs to be around their own people to feel whole and confident just like my polacy. I think I already told you guys my story of how the first thing ai did when ai came back from apoland one year when ai was in high school was to fight this Cuban bully who kept harassing me and ai did nothing until I touched apoland and came back.
Polson 5 | 1,771
10 Dec 2013 #2
A shrink could help with this identity crisis you seem to be facing.
If people focused more on what they have in common than what divides them, things would be much easier.
Nothing abnormal to feel better with your likes, but no need to create segregation and borders when they shouldn't exist.
Wulkan - | 3,251
11 Dec 2013 #3
It is a sign I don't and never will belong in white America

but you are white in general, do you have a problem with that? I hope not
OP Wariat 2 | 12
11 Dec 2013 #4
I am a Polak in general. We are a people and a race all onto ourselves. We are nothing like whites in America, blacks, Chinese or anyone else. I only feel comfortable around other Polaks and my own people not the cowards and cop callers in America. Or the female gold diggers and desperate housewife culture.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
11 Dec 2013 #5
You need to stop making blanket statements about white Americans.
peterweg 37 | 2,321
11 Dec 2013 #6
my own people not the cowards and cop callers in America

Calling the cops is normal. If you have to depend on nobody calling the cops, you are going to get screwed. You better leave the USA, but don't expect Poland to be a lawless thugs paradise, Poles will call the cops because they are growing up.
Enforcer
11 Dec 2013 #7
No one goes to cops unless you are an older woman or man and were robbed or victimized but never for getting beat up, or jumped or hit with something over the head particularly if you choose to fight or engage or choose to go to a soccer game in the nation (you have to fight just for showing up at the local matches often).
Szczelec29 - | 2
11 Dec 2013 #8
Just watch this video and if you know Polish listen to what the words are saying in the beginning and you know what it means to be Polak. To be a Polak means by nature to hate cops, tough laws, police state and everything America stands for:

youtube.com/watch?v=Qgv9lFtDOCg

This is just the tip of the iceberg if what happens in America would tried to be done by politicians in Poland, particularly anything to do with a sex offender registry or three strike laws:

youtube.com/watch?v=dcUen_-v0Fo
Polson 5 | 1,771
11 Dec 2013 #9
Enforcer
Szczelec29
=Wariat (suspended)

To be a Polak means by nature to hate cops

No, there is nothing like hating something/someone by nature.
Polaks have other problems than having that fixation about cops and America as you have.
Frumm
18 Aug 2014 #10
Polak means Polish male which I am
You Americans are not allowed to take that word and make a new definition to make it your word just like you did with the English language it's all screwed up now because again your taking someones invention changing it to make it your own. I know you dumb Americans think youre in the center of the universe. But the fact is your not we are all equal and you losers have the brashest egos in the whole world. **** when the Ukraine asked your pussy military for help all you did was sit back and relax. Stop being so selfish and start thinking about other people instead of always complaining that you never have enough in you life. Ya pigs need get OVA your stupid minor problems and grow up
Szalawa 3 | 248
18 Aug 2014 #11
Yeah Polak and Polka is the proper term, but some people decided to use it as an insult. Still it's better then getting called something you stick in the ground or shine your shoes with.
Wulkan - | 3,251
18 Aug 2014 #12
or shine your shoes with.

There is a significant pronunciation difference between: polish and Polish.
Szalawa 3 | 248
19 Aug 2014 #13
I know but it's annoying when someone mispronounces it which happens quite often
Wulkan - | 3,251
19 Aug 2014 #14
In fact, it's usually Polish people who do this. "I'm polish" instead of "I'm Polish" and that annoys me.
Marysienka 1 | 195
19 Aug 2014 #15
Are you sure? I wanted to ask what's the difference and it seems I wad taught wrong , I said polish like Polish. I mean it's palisz or Polisz
Wulkan - | 3,251
19 Aug 2014 #16
Polish = PO£LISZ

polish = POLISZ

more or less like that
Marysienka 1 | 195
19 Aug 2014 #17
OK Why this dictionary
oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/polish
has different pronunciation than this one
merriam-webster.com/dictionary/polish?show=0&t=1408459182

And since it seems I was saying polisz all my life it seems we should maybe teach teachers how to pronounce it? and to pay attention?
Wulkan - | 3,251
19 Aug 2014 #18
it seems we should maybe teach teachers how to pronounce it?

Yes, Polish English teachers make a lot of pronunciation mistakes that I can spot now after moving to England. For example I was told by a teacher in primary school that pronunciation of "where" and "were" is the same.
Marko313
27 Feb 2017 #19
I'm Polish and have no problem being called a Pollock! I refer to myself as a Pollock. What's the big deal?
SamTexas - | 19
7 Jul 2017 #20
@Marko313
Really? I thought it is very offensive to call a Pole Pollock, haha.
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
7 Jul 2017 #21
If his first name were "Jackson", Sam, he wouldn't find it offensive at all:-)
LOL
ChicagoPole - | 2
20 Jul 2017 #22
100% Polish here as well and i'm a Polak and proud of it.
Wulkan - | 3,251
20 Jul 2017 #23
I'm fine with Polak but wtf is Pollock? If a black guy called me like that I'd call niger to get even, for example.
nothanks - | 640
20 Jul 2017 #24
wtf is Pollock

Deliberate different pronunciation hence "pollock jokes" are mostly American I.E. pollocks are stupid. In comparison in Germany polaks are known for car thefts. Car thieves aren't usually known as being stupid. The irony is that when I spent a year in Vancouver, Canada as an adolescent i was teased by Canadians for being a "stupid American"

Instead of "Pol-Ak" you get "Pole-lock"

North Americans usually just form the sentence so that it's "Polish people". Pole is still not common
Wulkan - | 3,251
20 Jul 2017 #25
Instead of "Pol-Ak" you get "Pole-lock"

and that's deserves the reaction of disapproval.

teased by Canadians for being a "stupid American"

I'd laugh my head off if Canadian tried to tease me for my nationality.
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
20 Jul 2017 #26
"Pollock", once again is the spelling of a family name. Written with a small 'p', of course, it's also a type of fish, and has nothing to do with "Polak":-) Merely a point of information.

lol
Kiellybasa - | 5
25 Jul 2017 #27
Growing up here in the Northeast U.S. being called a "dumb Polak" is not uncommon. It is used as an ethnic slur, regardless of its actual meaning. It was even used relentlessly in a television sitcom in the 1970's.

We have always been on the outside of the "white" community. Remember, whiteness in America has everything and nothing to do with skin color. I consider myself different from white america, while acknowledging that I am usually seen as white and therefore have all the privileges that go with that.

I don't think people should be divided, though. Experiencing prejudice should make you not want to do the same to other ethnic groups. Prejudice is bad.

(as an aside, no one has EVER pronounced it "poll-ock" around here.)
Marsupial - | 886
25 Jul 2017 #28
Oposite to me. I decide whos white and who aint little f...g punk pissants. But yeah....different people.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
2 Aug 2017 #29
I've embraced the term polak and use it often.
when you own /use a hurtful pejorative, you neutralize it as blacks have done.
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
2 Aug 2017 #30
...add to that, only when Polish-Americans or even Poles say that amongst each other!! Same with African-Americans referring to one another with the N-word, Jews referring to one another as "Yid" aka "Yiddele" etc.....


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