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American Polonia. Wisconsin - the most Polish state?


krysia 23 | 3,057
7 Nov 2009 #31
there are way more Polish people in Chicago:)

You mean "live" ones.
But hey, keep'em there. Whatever makes you happy. :)
Arien 3 | 721
7 Nov 2009 #32
Oh yeah, now I remember. A letter from Winconsin.

:D

Thanks!
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
9 Nov 2009 #33
Great photos Śledź! Maybe next time round you'll also get to snap the big Polish Cultural Centre outside Milwaukee, Milwaukee's Polish Fest (billed as America's biggest Polish festival), and maybe the offices of Gwiazda Polarna newspaper and Point Brewery in Stevens Point. There is also Kraków, Wilno, Polonia and Pułaski Wisconsin and plenty of gravestones with Polish names thereon. The religious journal Miesięcznik Franciszkański is still being published, I believe, in Pułaski.
krysia 23 | 3,057
9 Nov 2009 #34
Milwaukee's Polish Fest (billed as America's biggest Polish festival),

Chicago's Taste Of Polonia is bigger. I was at both so I know and anyone can say what they want. Chicago has more food stands, more events, more people. Milwaukee has a larger lake front area and is called Polish Festival. Chicago is called TOP

and maybe the offices of Gwiazda Polarna newspaper and Point Brewery in Stevens Point.

Sledz will supply you with those next time he comes over. we will take the brewery tour again. I'm sure he would like that :)
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
12 Nov 2009 #35
Merged:American Polonia in facts and figures

POLISH AMERICANS

STATES TOTAL POLISH POPULATION %100 OF TOTAL US

9,050,1223.3 % of national population

NEW YORK 958,893 10.6
ILLINOIS 946,241 10.5
MICHIGAN 900,335 9.9
PENNSYLVANIA 855,526 9.5
NEW JERSEY 591,347 6.5
CALIFORNIA 496,588 5.5
WISCONSIN 481,779 5.3
FLORIDA 430,138 4.8
OHIO 404,557 4.5
MASSACHUSETTS 349,998 3.9
CONNECTICUT 278,010 3.1
TEXAS 234,861 2.6
MINNESOTA 222,997 2.5
MARYLAND 186,312 2.1
INDIANA 164,587 1.8
ARIZONA 140,541 1.6
VIRGINIA 112,658 1.2
MISSOURI 104,460 1.2
COLORADO 97,420 1.1
IOWA 31,861 0.4

allied-media.com/ETHNICTV/polcensus.htm
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
12 Nov 2009 #36
9,050,1223.3 % of national population

Shouldn't that be
9,050,122, 3.3 % of national population

?
Grzegorz - | 2
17 Nov 2009 #37
Greetings everyone,

There is no shame in saying "I don't know". And that is exactly what would have been said instead of stating as fact, what factual is not :) We aren't speaking here of anything terribly important, but:

@Krysia: "TWO POLISH STORES IN THE WHOLE STATE OF WISCONSIN!!!" There are more than two Polish stores in Wisconsin. The Milwaukee area itself has several. And yes, we still speak Polish here.

naszewisconsin.ning.com/forum/topics/polskie-zakupy-w-wisconsin

@nunczka: "The original immigrants are all dead". As far as I can tell I'm still alive and so are many, many other Poles I know. If you do understand Polish you could register at nasza-klasa.pl where you would easily find plenty of first generation Poles who live in this state.

And if you'd like a local Wisconsin place to practice your Polish, I invite you to naszeWisconsin.com where you can get to know other Polish speaking people, share your pictures and run your own blog - in Polish. There is no English version, however.

naszeWisconsin.com also offers a Google-mapped directory (Informator) listing various businesses who can understand you in Polish :)
cheehaw 2 | 263
19 Nov 2009 #38
there are TONS of great lakes area (originally) Polish and slav retirees (70+) in Florida.

every grandpa with an auto or steel mill worker pension is down there.

probably won't see many more of those though.
krysia 23 | 3,057
19 Nov 2009 #39
There are more than two Polish stores in Wisconsin. The Milwaukee area itself has several. And yes, we still speak Polish here.

The Milwaukee area has only two and I checked your website and here are the two:

Sklepy Spożywcze
A&J Polish Deli and Liquor
1215 W. Lincoln Ave
Milwaukee WI 53215

tel. 414 643 7733
Old World Deli and Liquor
7630 W. Grange Ave
Greendale WI 53129
tel. 414 855 0470. This one just opened two years ago

A third European store just opened up in Adams. So now we got three. But they come and go. Stevens Point had a European Deli but that didn't do so go.

As far as I can tell I'm still alive and so are many, many other Poles I know.

So how old would that make you? Original Polish immigrants came around 1850's. The first Polish family in Polonia settled around 1854.
Milwaukee isn't the whole Wiscinsin.
Eurola 4 | 1,906
19 Nov 2009 #40
Have fun visiting the cemetery!

Actually, I would not mind to visit some old polish cemetery...

naszeWisconsin.com

Good luck with the website! I hope you you get lots and lots of polish residents in Wisconsin as members.
Grzegorz - | 2
19 Nov 2009 #41
@Eurola: Thank you for your kind words. naszeWisconsin.com simply tries to provide a forum for sharing thoughts with other local Polish speakers.

@Krysia: I see that by "original" we mean two different things: You and Nunczka are referring to "first ever", while I, just like Cheehaw, meant "the first generation". But to answer your question, no I am nowhere near being 150 years old. The two stores you found are listed in the Informator section of our website. There are more to be found in the forum, and I included a direct link in my earlier post. I've heard Kenosha may have a Polish/European deli as well. Does anyone know?
cheehaw 2 | 263
19 Nov 2009 #42
actually my grandparents arrived here around 1905, both sides of the family. My oldest grandfather was born in 1893, was a teenager, and my grandmother there too, other side of the family, they were younger.. little kids when they arrived here. My dad was the youngest of 6 kids, his parents died when i was still a kid, they were pretty old. Barely spoke english.

What i meant to suggest is that..those numbers are low when you consider all the polish retirees in FL. Plenty of them are down there.

They all seem to speak Polish too.. in our generation.. polish was the 'secret' language the elders spoke when they didn't want us to know what they were talking about. It is too bad they did that but seems they did it a lot.

You know what even.. if you think about it.. chances are really good that a lot of Polish parents did not teach the native language to us kids after WWII because poland was in the soviet bloc then and maybe they didn't want us kids to be associated with that by our american peers.
dave73 - | 7
4 Dec 2009 #43
I had no thought that Wisconsin had a lot of Polish people at anytime in its state history. I had always heard that Irish & Germans were big ethnic groups up there. Where I live at in Indiana, my area was built around a big Polish population, with Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian, Greek, Italian, Irish, & German. Eastern European groups were the largest in the early part of the 20th century. While those with Polish blood in them are still large in NW Indiana, most are 3rd & 4th generation Polish with a mixture of other ethnic groups, and only speak English. I have 2nd cousins who are part Polish (from their dad's side, with the last name Lewandowski), along with Irish & German from their mother's side.

I somehow escaped being part Polish. My mom's side is Irish, German, Slovakian, Welsh or English, and my maternal grandparents were 1st generation US born. My dad's side is Irish, German, Cherokee Indian, and somewhere in the family, Danish, as I have a Danish last name.

At least in the midwest, I find Chicago & the northern suburbs of Chicago having a lot of Polish, and hear the Polish language. Once I have enough money to travel, I'll have to look more into Wisconsin.

As for Polish festivals, Whiting Indiana has Perogi Fest, and it isn't what it used to be.
Arlene
20 Jan 2010 #44
My sirname is Polish, I know and understand the Polish language.... My hometown is Bevent, Wisconsin which is still in the year 2010 one of the most populated Polish areas in the whole USA because 61% of the people who live in BEVENT, WISCONSIN are

VERY PROUD TO BE POLISH.
King Majewski 1 | 2
27 Mar 2010 #45
Okay! I have to jump in this dog fight. As for not being any true poles in Milwaukee that is just crazy. Many times I see cars in Milwaukee with polish flags hanging from their mirrors. There are 10+ polish deli's, only 6 polish bars but many other bars in Milw serve polish beer. There is a polonia milwaukee page on Facebook with 1600+ members from Milw and Poland. There is a ton of polish churches polishchurchesofmilwaukee.com. I have been shopping and on public transportation many of times and heard polish being spoken. Most poles in Milwaukee moved south of Lincoln ave. There is polanki.org Milwaukee's polish women organization. the polishcenterofwisconsin.org and the syrenadancers.com who hold dances and other polish celebrations in Milwaukee. There is way too much too list here.

There is another forum that discusses this as well: city-data.com/forum/milwaukee/206681-polish-neighborhoods-2.html

I have met several poles from Poland in Milwaukee and most people I run into know how to pronounce Majewski. You see polish flags hanging from homes on Milw's south side.

True we only have two polish restaurants but we have other restaurants owned by poles from Poland. Milwaukee is no Chicago in terms of how polish it is but it's not like Milwaukee's polish community is dead or near death. 60,000+ call themselves polish in Milwaukee. We have a lot of parks and schools named after famous poles in Milw.

There is also syrenkachildrenspolishdancers.org/Syrenka/Home.html and adees.com which sells polish stuff in Milwaukee. We also have the Krakow dancers of Milwaukee and /Illuminating-Particular-Photographs-Milwaukees-Polish. I can buy polish newspapers an DVD's and music in Milwaukee. Let's not look past the poles that have moved to Milwaukee in recent years.

So let's not act like Milwaukee only has 3 real polish people left.
WarsaWasRaw
28 Mar 2010 #46
The whole Polish/American scene is just so... depressing. Bumper stickers, white-and-red kitsch, picnics, polka dances, bingo, civic clubs, chruch groups. Mostly old people doing and arguing about inconsequential things. It all has this past oriented quality, too. You bet your dupa I'm Polish, cabbage, old, past, dying. Bleeeee. No wonder that so few 2nd generation "Poles" speak the language.

I posit the thesis that the degree to which children of immigrants speak their parents' language is a measure of how superior/inferior the native culture is compared to the host one. Much like a strong currency will displace a weaker one in the mattresses of Polish people, so too a strong culture will suppress a weaker one in the minds of their children.

Ever notice how Americans born abroad always speak American?
Ever notice how Polish people born in the former Soviet republics speak Polish, but those born in the West rarely do?

What's up with Polish people hoarding obscene amounts of cash money in their houses?
plk123 8 | 4,150
28 Mar 2010 #47
WarsaWasRaw: Ever notice how Polish people born in the former Soviet republics speak Polish, but those born in the West rarely do?

i'd have to disagree. from personal experience that is not at all true.
BookOwl - | 22
27 Aug 2010 #48
I posit the thesis that the degree to which children of immigrants speak their parents' language is a measure of how superior/inferior the native culture is compared to the host one.

WarsaWasRaw-
I find your thinly-veiled racism against Poles and Polish culture ugly, highly offensive, and, frankly, revolting. It has no place in a modern society of tolerance and mutual acceptance of others' differing backgrounds and cultures.

And, be very careful when using the words "superior and inferior" when referring to culture or race. Adolph Hitler used those same words, "Superior Race," in referring to the blond-haired, blue-eyed Aryans that he thought should rule the world to the elimination of all other "races." (i.e., Jews, mentally & physically handicapped people, etc.) When people start thinking of one race or culture as superior to another, disastrous results are sure to follow.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
28 Aug 2010 #49
WarsaWasRaw-
I find your thinly-veiled racism against Poles and Polish culture ugly, highly offensive, and, frankly, revolting. It has no place in a modern society of tolerance and mutual acceptance of others' differing backgrounds and cultures.

I fully agree.. my thoughts are, why do these people have this obscession to hate
so much? they must be extremely unpleasent to be around if they have this huge
hatred towards Polish/Polish Americans.. its not like they did anything to this person
so what type of hateful upbringing did they have??

how can one person be so mad at people that did nothing to them?

how can it be so depressing that they can hate people over it..

all I can say is , since your so depressed warsa take a large dose of
Icouldgivetwoshytsinol, that should clear up the depressing diarrhea that is
oozzing from your mouth.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
28 Aug 2010 #50
WarsaWasRaw

I posit the thesis that the degree to which children of immigrants speak their parents' language is a measure of how superior/inferior the native culture is compared to the host one. Much like a strong currency will displace a weaker one in the mattresses of Polish people, so too a strong culture will suppress a weaker one in the minds of their children.

My great grandparents immigrated to this country between 1880 - 1900. They spoke both German and Polish. My grand parents spoke Polish and English. Our parents spoke a rudimentary Polish and English and only spoke Polish when they didn't want us to know what they were saying. The third/fourth generation only speaks English. We were never encouraged to speak Polish I think because there was no need. We were living in America.

My opinion, but if anyone is going to immigrate to another land one should learn the language and culture of the host country. People who permanently move to Poland should learn the language and absorb the local culture. Why wouldn't you? If you don't you are forever on the outside looking in. How shallow. If a Pole moves to Norway become Norwegian, in Denmark do as the Danes, in France the same and so on. If I moved back to Poland I would learn the language and the culture and contribute to Polish Society. No other way.
BookOwl - | 22
28 Aug 2010 #51
if anyone is going to immigrate to another land one should learn the language and culture of the host country.

Yes, I think one should learn the language and learn about the culture. But I'm not sure that one should necessarily immerse oneself in the culture.

For example, what if my husband were transferred to a country like Iran or Iraq, which has a very traditional Islamic culture? My family is Christian. Are you saying that we should all become Muslim so that we can "absorb the culture" and "contribute to ...society"? If we didn't, it is doubtful that the people would accept us as true members of their community. Sure, we could all learn the language and learn as much as possible about the culture. We could try to make friends with the Iranians or Iraqis despite our very different cultures and backgrounds.

However, I think it would be very difficult to truly become a part of the community without becoming Muslim. And that is something that I would not be able to do, since I am a strong, committed Christian.

Also, what is wrong with folks retaining some of their traditions from the "old country" to pass along to their children, and to their children's children, and so on? That is one of the things that makes America so great: she is a melting pot of all different ethnic groups from all over the world! If everyone dropped their celebrations and traditions from the old country, America would become a boring place, indeed.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
28 Aug 2010 #52
For example, what if my husband were transferred to a country like Iran or Iraq, which has a very traditional Islamic culture?

I mentioned moving permanently to another country. Not a temporary work assignment. BTW Iraq and Iran have Christian minorities. I used to work with a couple of 'em.

Also, what is wrong with folks retaining some of their traditions from the "old country" to pass along to their children, and to their children's children, and so on? That is one of the things that makes America so great: she is a melting pot of all different ethnic groups from all over the world! If everyone dropped their celebrations and traditions from the old country, America would become a boring place, indeed.

In a sense your living a lie. You live in a never-never land. If someone has been here or anywhere for that matter for two or three generations what connection does one have with the old country? Culture evolves, it's dynamic. Your traditions are of a Poland of what, 100 years ago? That's not the culture of today.

Exactly, American is a melting pot. They melt into American culture.
nunczka 8 | 458
28 Aug 2010 #53
Ya,ll might just as well forget about keeping the Polish Culture alive in America. I am 1st generation. My parents came here in the early 1900.. I was raised in a Polish speaking household.I am well versed in Polish culture. My daughter who is 2nd generation just recognizes the dirty words. Her kids the 3rd generation are ethnicaly cleaned. The word Polish means nothing to them.

The mass migrations are over.. There are but a small amount of Poles coming to America compared the the early years. Chicago still rules. In my hometown Baltimore it is just a memory of the great days growing up in a large Polish community.

In 40 years the white people will be the minority in America.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
28 Aug 2010 #54
you know, i always read on this forum how Pol-Ams are very successful, have all this money....but i simply don't see it. granted, i've never been to Chicago and i don't know what the scene is there, how they live, etc., but it always seems like Poles choose purely shite places to live in america.

Wisconsin? freezing ass cold, boon docks location.....uhmmm.....great cheddar cheese? that's it.

Michigan? i've been to the polish towns in Michigan around Detroit.....absolutely run down towns.

Minnesota??? another freezing cold place to live, and it's major cities are some of the most dangerous in America.

Greenpoint Brooklyn is nothing to write home about either. been there 100 times, it's pretty run down. can be fun, a few friends of mine enjoy living there, but run down.

sure, i know successful pol-ams as well, but i always can't help but wonder why they all seem to gather in such crappy areas of the country.

it's just an observation of course, but if they're as successful as posters on PF say they are, why do they insist on living in the armpits of the USA? either that, or most of them are not successful and have to stay in cheap crappy towns and the successful ones are all living in San Diego and Miami.

it kinda reminds me of poles in poland. i know just a few very well off poles, and when i go to visit them at their houses, i'm absolutely baffled with the towns they live in. his and hers mercedes in the driveway, brand new 2500sq. ft. home, dead smack in the middle of an absolute HOLE of a town. man oh man, with all that cash, get outta dodge already, no???
Meathead 5 | 470
28 Aug 2010 #55
FUZZYWICKETS

Typical Eastern Seaboard response. C'mon admit it, you've never been west of the Alleghenies.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
28 Aug 2010 #56
Michigan? i've been to the polish towns in Michigan around Detroit.....absolutely run down towns.

lol ever here of the burbs??

all the polish moved out to the burbs,, what century you in?
Plusa10 3 | 23
28 Aug 2010 #57
Chicago has the most Pol-Ams...
but that's just coming from my babcia from Poland to Chicago :)
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
29 Aug 2010 #58
patrycja19 wrote:

all the polish moved out to the burbs,, what century you in?

does it really matter. we're talking Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin. not desireable places to live, suburbs or not, which is my point.

i grew up in New Jersey which has several polish towns, and every single one of them.....run down.

i'd say i'm most certainly in this century.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
30 Aug 2010 #59
FUZZYWICKETS

does it really matter. we're talking Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin. not desireable places to live, suburbs or not, which is my point.

Fuzzy, You're invited to go to downtown Chicago and Minneapolis (on your dime of course). In Chicago go to the SE Corner of Wacker and Michigan and go down the stairs to the River and take the boat ride where they explain the architecture of Chicago. By all means take in the night life in Chicago, start at Rush St. and work your way northwest to the Polish joints mentioned in earlier posts. Ya might find some of your ex-students from Polska.

Next drive on I-94 (right through Wisconsin) all the way to Minneapolis. Make a bee line for downtown. Check out the restaurants, night life and the University of Minnesota is nearby. Hey ya know they have a waterfall downtown?? Nice city, Minneapolis. There's more but too much to list right now.
Matt32 4 | 83
30 Aug 2010 #60
I never visited Wisconsin, however I heard that it is beautiful country and state capitol in Madison is quite agreeable.
Also Orson Wells was from Wisconsin - I think?
Oh! They produce good quality and quantity milk and butter.
State Uni is very good.


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