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Do the poles like British culture


jon357 74 | 21,818
26 Oct 2012 #61
They burn parts of London. They kill some people and steal some stuff.

You must have read the same 'history' book as Magdalena. The Tyler/Simnel revolt was part of a greater movement with uprisings in most major cities and decades of conflict!
Ant63 13 | 410
26 Oct 2012 #62
I'm talking about history here. Approx. 1500 years of it.

Find Simin Schama's history of britain to find out just how bloody our past is. It's excellent. Well worth watching.
Barney 15 | 1,583
26 Oct 2012 #63
I had mentioned the Peasants' Revolt earlier. I agree, this is what I am talking about when I say "revolution".

Magda you are quite correct the English are an extremely conservative people by nature they tend to like the status quo (and Status Quo). The feudal then class system is ingrained, this is why they haven't had a revolution since the Medieval Period.

The big national myth is magna carta but all this did was move stuff down one small rung.
jon357 74 | 21,818
26 Oct 2012 #64
Find Simon Schama's history of britain to find out just how bloody our past is. It's excellent. Well worth watching.

Exactly. The country where modern democracy emerged, where Capitalism and Socialism were formed and where the basics of cultural and societal valued have evolved over centuries. I haven't seen the TV version, but Schama's bookis excellent.
Barney 15 | 1,583
26 Oct 2012 #65
Find Simin Schama's history of britain to find out just how bloody our past is

Very few countries don’t have a bloody past England certainly does, but we are not talking platitudes or foreign conquest and plunder.

The lack of a revolution in England is a good indicator of the conservative and pliable nature of the people.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
26 Oct 2012 #66
where the basics of cultural and societal valued have evolved over centuries.

I think you got a teeny-weeny bit carried away just there ;-)
Ziemowit 14 | 4,278
26 Oct 2012 #67
Again a misinterpretation. Try not to confuse English history with Polish history, which has been centuries of the rich squabbling over the rich - indeed that could be a good title of a book about the First Republic.

You think that's a bad thing? Certainly a contrast to the failed Coup d'état in Warsaw in the same period. Some of the longer term benefits of the General Strike affect your life now.

This is clearly patronising the Polish people living in Britain by the English people living in Poland. Or am I wrong with my assumption? And if I'm wrong, tell me why I'm wrong here?

partronize = traiter avec condescedance, prendre un air supérieur avec quelqu'un
[The above is an example of patronysing the English people by any other people through using the French language in the aim of trying to explain things to the English people]
uk expat 1 | 11
26 Oct 2012 #68
There is no England anymore... it died with Thatcher :-)
Barney 15 | 1,583
26 Oct 2012 #69
Modern democracy did not emerge in Britain that’s a myth. It emerged in Iceland, The Celtic brehon laws are a form of democracy that emerged and evolved over centuries and easily hold their own against modern democracy. You can however say that English democracy was formed in Britain.

Capitalism was formed in Holland not Britain
Socialism? no one can claim to have invented socialism that’s like saying we invented running....

Cultural and societal values are lacking elsewhere?
Harry
26 Oct 2012 #70
The lack of a revolution in England is a good indicator of the conservative and pliable nature of the people.

Perhaps. Or it could be an indicator of the people at the top always taking care to ensure the people at the bottom are taken care of well enough that they do not revolt. That might also explain why the great estates of the rich of Britain haven't been burned within living memory, which is not a claim your own country can make.
jon357 74 | 21,818
26 Oct 2012 #71
Actually modern European democracy did emerge in the UK - the Reform Act and the widening of the franchise are the key elements. And bloodless too.

Maybe worth mentioning some British guys with big ideas over in the colonies too.
Barney 15 | 1,583
26 Oct 2012 #72
Or it could be an indicator of the people at the top always taking care to ensure the people at the bottom are taken care of well enough that they do not revolt.

That is a possibility and if true would partly undermine every left leaning and left thinking individual. It would also beg the question if true why all the Victorian religious philanthropists were needed.

I don’t ascribe any negative connotation to conservatism some of my friends are English, it’s just that I'm not conservative.

That might also explain why the great estates of the rich of Britain haven't been burned within living memory, which is not a claim your own country can make.

When you have a foreign aristocracy who dont speak the same language as the people are of a different religion to the people and live in another country that may go some way towards explaining why their estates were burnt.

But let’s not get into a debate about English colonialism

the Reform Act

You are talking about democracy and using the reform act as an example!!
The reform act that discriminated against its own citizens on the grounds of wealth and still no revolt….

Check out Icelandic democracy and the Brehon laws
Harry
26 Oct 2012 #73
if true would partly undermine every left leaning and left thinking individual.

And it would equally show how successful they have been.

a foreign aristocracy who dont speak the same language as the people are of a different religion to the people and live in another country

Only 15% of the people of Ireland spoke Irish then and I wasn't aware that the Catholic church smiled upon burning houses, so a truly religious Catholic wouldn't do it.
Barney 15 | 1,583
26 Oct 2012 #74
[Harry
Do the poles like British culture
There are loads of places to discuss Ireland.
Ironside 53 | 12,437
26 Oct 2012 #75
The country where modern democracy emerged,

err.. what?

I haven't seen the TV version, but Schama's bookis excellent.

Sure, flattery is generally liked.

Normans did a good job culling Anglo-Saxon population. Ruling class rules. :)

Anyway magdalena how would you explain German attitude toward authorities? I think you are mixing here two orders, one is naturally developed respect for authority in countries where authority wasn't oppressive too much and a revolt aimed at changing status quo.

Such revolt would mean quarrel within a ruling class (as has happened during civil War) or if revlotees would have had developed their own ruling class. In Britain system was flexible enough to nip such attempts in the bud.
enkidu 7 | 623
26 Oct 2012 #76
That might also explain why the great estates of the rich of Britain haven't been burned within living memory, which is not a claim your own country can make.

Well... Per analogiam. There was no violent uprising in the Auschwitz concentration camp.
Is that a sign that the prisoners were glad with the treatment they received?
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498
26 Oct 2012 #77
This thread illustrates that there is no British culture.
enkidu 7 | 623
26 Oct 2012 #78
There is a strong and distinct British culture. You people just looking in the wrong direction. For instance - The British had fought many wars, but in the core the are not an militaristic nation. They celebrate the Remembrance Day symbolised by the poppy flower and not some Glorious Victory Day.

They are not rebellious. And this is not their weakness. This is their power. They are pragmatic as hell. They prefer pragmatic and calculated approach over some violent outburst.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498
26 Oct 2012 #79
They are not rebellious

6th verse of the national anthem ?
enkidu 7 | 623
26 Oct 2012 #80
enkidu:
They are not rebellious

6th verse of the national anthem ?

"Long to reign over us:"

And your point is...
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498
26 Oct 2012 #81
Throughout this thread British culture is equated to English culture, the two have been used interchangeably. My point is that they are not.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
26 Oct 2012 #82
My point is that they are not.

I for one have consistently spoken of England and the English.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498
26 Oct 2012 #83
And thats my point entirely.....see the title of the thread.
SeanBM 35 | 5,806
26 Oct 2012 #84
national anthem

What's Liechtenstein got to do with this thread?
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
26 Oct 2012 #85
see the title of the thread.

I thought we had moved away from "British culture" when we started discussing the martial law in Poland? Also, I don't think there truly is a homogeneous British culture. British is an umbrella term for a bunch of different things, and I only know a bit about the English part of them ;-)
isthatu2 4 | 2,694
26 Oct 2012 #86
Questioning authority is just not part of the English mindset.

Have you ever posted a single comment on this site that is not complete arse droppings love?
You think you are some genius,but pathetically you are just someone who translates what Polish shop lifters say all day......stick to that,not some analysis of a nation far older than the one you come from and will hopefully be returning to soon.....thids is a classic example of your dumbness,easily disproved,laughable to anyone wit even a middle school education yet I bet my last farthing you will never retract your statement as you know you are right,and we dumb lazy Britons are obviously wrong.....sad mare...

How many uprisings of any kind in England? Did the English poor and downtrodden ever revolt? The answer is a resounding NO.

Im sure people have pointed out the dozen or so uprisings ever century since AD43, maybe even pointed you at Tacitus. Lets just add the American revolution to this too as all the uprisers involved in that considered themselves to be Englishmen fighting for the Englishmans rights.......
hudsonhicks 21 | 346
1 Nov 2012 #87
Not really....

There's a minority of good Immigrant Poles here, who behave like guests in our country and integrate well. Usually these people are well educated and/or working amongst the British and other nationalities.

The rest are just peasants... in income, and in mentality.

Working in factories amongst their own kind. They rarely associate or make friends with British people. These are the same ones that shop exclusively at Polski Sklep, only drink Polish Beer and scour online forums seeking their local Polish Mechanic or Polish Salon.
zetigrek
18 Nov 2012 #88
I've never lived in the UK but I like some music from there: nu jazz, electronic genres, Florence & the Machine, Editors. As for the movies there were several I liked but I rarely watch British movies. However I like some British actors of older generation.

OP should ask not about comprehension of James Bond movies but rather Monty Python.
NorthMancPolak 4 | 646
18 Nov 2012 #89
Unfortunately I'm only UK Polonia lol, but I can quite happily watch Polish TV or Polish DVDs all day long.

Polish music, on the other hand... no.

Most of it, to my ears, sounds like a lame copy of UK/US music.

However, when it comes to death metal, there is no-one British who can even try and come close to Decapitated - they are just so great at what they do, it's hard to believe they're from Poland lol.
kondzior 11 | 1,046
19 Nov 2012 #90
This is a Englishman I can respect. Good to know there are still principled, pro-family Christian men out there who don't bow to homosexual activism.

ugh

Passengers spent 20 minutes stranded on a bus after its driver refused to board because of a gay rights message on the side.
The unnamed driver would not get on the X78 from Rotherham to Sheffield because it bore a billboard for gay lobby group Stonewall, reading: 'Some people are gay. Get over it!'
Passengers sat and waited while the driver argued loudly with colleagues and customers.
Among those on the bus was Rebecca Neill, 25, from Herringthorpe, South Yorkshire, who had boarded the 5.25pm service at Rotherham and had just taken her seat when the commotion began.
'Once the driver had let us on the bus, he was meant to be swapping with another driver, but when his replacement wouldn’t get on they just left us there while they had an argument outside,' she said.

Brits, you need more countrymen like these. It is your only chance.


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