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Poles 2nd to Indians in UK


polonius 56 | 421    
12 Dec 2012  #1
According to a census study, Poles are now second only to Indians as the major immigrant communtiy in the UK.

thenews.pl/1/9/Artykul/121253,Census-confirms-Poles-as-UKs-second-biggest-foreign-community

I wonder if anyone on PF would feel competent to compare the impact the post-WW2 DP generation and the current Polish crop have made on life in the UK. (Not a doctoral disseration but maybe a few concise comaprisons?)

To what a extent are today's Polish newcomers assimilating to British cultural and social norms, customs and values?

Have the Polish influenced native Brits and their lifestlyes in any way?

Among the average Brit does the sound of Polish spoken on the streets evoke:
curiosity, interest, indifference or resentment?

In your view, do the majority plan to make a life for themselves in the UK or only want to earn a nest egg before returning home or moving elsehwere?
zetigrek    
12 Dec 2012  #2
Are you trying to incite delibaretely?
Just wait for hundsonhicks to reply you.
johnb121 4 | 184    
12 Dec 2012  #3
Before moving to Poland, I lived in a part of London which, for the last 100 or so years, had been white, working class. I lived there from 1993 till 2011, so after a few years I saw first an influx of albanians, serbs and such, who seemed to hang around in street corners giving passers by the evil eye. Then the council flats (4 huge blocks) were decanted so they became sink estates, taking the scum the counicil could not or would not place in nice areas or properties. Then I became aware of the Polish influx, but that was spread thinner. I saw a small number of Polski Skleps open; Tesco had 1/4 of an aisle devoted to Polish foodstuffs, but in truth, the Polish population merged in more with the general population than lothers before them. You became aware of "polish builders" because that was a newspaper favourite, but also true - lots of building tradesmen were/are Polish. The building trade seemed to attract a large number of Poles, both skilled and manual labour. I also met a gew Poles when I spent three months in hospital, nurses mostly, or skilled people working to earn their UK equivalent qualifications. I worked with Poles in the office - the firm employed Poles in one particular department, with clients and connections in Poland and Eastern Europe. Elsewhere British was the staff norm, but the firm employed people from all over the world. So, I worked with Polish people, with them in the same street, shopped with Poles and visited the doctor and hospital with (or to be treated by) Poles and I did hire a Polish decorater!

To what a extent are today's Polish newcomers assimilating to British cultural and social norms, customs and values? They fit in for the most part. Like all people, like attracts like, so at work and at leisure they can often be found together or working/spedning free time with other Poles. There were few occasions when you could "spot" polish people, but in eg Tesco you'd see and maybe think "Polish" as two young guys push a trolley around buying beer, Polish foodstuffs etc.

Have the Polish influenced native Brits and their lifestlyes in any way? In the North of Engand, where I came from, there were still Polish guys who'd stayed behind after WW2. Very much a part of the community. I'd say that in London they have fitted in rather than stood out - but E Wedel chocolate became quite popular!

Among the average Brit does the sound of Polish spoken on the streets evoke: curiosity, interest, indifference or resentment? I'd say the average Brit does not recognise Polish when he/she hears it. There are so many languages spoken in London, hearing Polish would invoke no reaction. Hearing shoutingm, running feet, threatening sounds ... that is what British people, especiaslly city-dwellers, are on the lookout for.

In your view, do the majority plan to make a life for themselves in the UK or only want to earn a nest egg before returning home or moving elsehwere? I'm not sure anyone these days has a true long-term plan that they are activiely following in the way the question suggests. The majority of people - Polish, British or other - are surviving, hoping they will still have a job next week, month or next year. Hoping they can afford Xmas ...
OP polonius 56 | 421    
12 Dec 2012  #4
No, I am genuinely interested. What is inflammatory about being in second place? Or asking about the mutual influence of Poles on Brits and Brits on Poles?
zetigrek    
12 Dec 2012  #5
Your questions have been answered many times and usually the answers were not so mild and favorable as the one above. What for evoke the same discussion again? To hear another series of moans about "Poles stealing our jobs"?
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
13 Dec 2012  #6
No difference,a few brits might speak a few words of Polish now,normally swear words,and might drink tyskie beer because its cheap but Im afraid thats about it for the latest batch.

Even the post 1945 batch didnt really impact on British culture much for that you have to go back to the late 19th and early 20th century batch and Im afraid some people on hear will not count those Poles as *real* Poles.....

Brits dont eat pierogi after the pub but curry, face it, Indian culture has been here for 200 years now, anything that Poles bring is just a slightly different version of some Euro/Amerikanski thing anyway. We had Indian culture even before we had many Indians here from people coming back from Empire stations.

Why should todays Poles make an effort, they can go home to Poland whenever they want, our previous immigrant waves have mainly come from refugees or from people who came here not for work but for British culture and rule of law with work a close second of course as everyone has to survive :)

Polish or just non english on the street? most brits,ie not raving nationalist lunatics its indifference, outsiders dont get pointed at like they still do in Polands off the beaten track parts :)
kaz200972 2 | 229    
13 Dec 2012  #7
Most Brits don't care if the Poles stay in Britain or leave it. Britain has a long history of accepting other races and I doubt that will change any time soon. It's true that many people worry about the lack of employment for the indigenous population but most realise it's up to the government to sort out the benefit system and get the long term unemployed back into work. There are also many people who feel that Britain should leave the EU but again they realise that this is something they must lobby MP's and parliament about.

If there are jobs available in Britain the Poles will obviously apply for them, most people understand and accept this.
The Poles have made very little impact on British culture because unless people have come into direct contact with them, they don't really stand out in any way. Indian culture has had a far greater impact on British society partially because of the long contact with the country and because it's more colourful? I personally enjoy the Polish cakes and some of the films but most people in Britain have little or no interest in Poland
zetigrek    
13 Dec 2012  #8
outsiders dont get pointed at like they still do in Polands off the beaten track parts :)

Don't be so sure about that:

youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=aIbpt1aDFqM

Watch it from 39:40 to 40:00.

How many times a car in Poland stops to call a random stranger "Abdul"?
OP polonius 56 | 421    
13 Dec 2012  #9
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I have heard that many Brits enjoy frequentling Polish pubs for the Polish beer and vodka and food as well as shopping in Polish shops for goods that are both tasty and cheaper. Of course, that is possible only where such outlets exist.

In London, Ealing was the hub of the post-WW2 émigrés. Do the new migrants cluster together in any neighbourhoods or are they completely scattered.
Ant63 11 | 403    
13 Dec 2012  #10
I grew up in a village which was close to a Polish WW2 Airbase. There were several Polish families in the village in the 1970's that I guess had settled post war. As it was not a large village everybody knew everybody and everyones business. I can remember nothing that made them any different to anybody else in the village. They attended social events within the community and went to the pub. I can't ever remember anyone pointing the finger, saying they are Polish. I guess they just integrated but they retained their identity because everyone knew they were Polish.

I don't see the same level of integration now. I know of only a small minority that socialise outside of their own community here where I live now. Maybe thats because the world is an easier place to get around now, and rather than view England as their new home, it is only a temporary residence. Personally I think it is a pity, that more don't get involved and that way, most probably their perception of England and English people would change. I think undoubtedly the perception of English people would change if Polish people were more involved in the local community. I don't think that will happen any time soon as there are so many this time round, that its just easier for them to stick to their own.

Just my experience and not aimed at offending anybody.
kaz200972 2 | 229    
13 Dec 2012  #11
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I have heard that many Brits enjoy frequentling Polish pubs for the Polish beer and vodka and food as well as shopping in Polish shops for goods that are both tasty and cheaper.

Very few Polish pubs around, maybe a few in London? Polish brands of beer/vodka have been available in larger supermarkets and delicatessens long before trhe Poles came over in any number. Polish shops are expensive over here,quite often selling exactly the same stuff as supermarkets except with a Polish label! Cakes/cake mixes and breads are harder to find outside 'sklepy' as are some of the sausages/cured meats.

Don't be so sure about that:

D--kheads in every country I'm afraid!!!!

Just my experience and not aimed at offending anybody.

Your post is very true and not in the least offensive!
zetigrek    
13 Dec 2012  #12
D--kheads in every country I'm afraid!!!!

Yes, that's why no one should feel hollier than thou.
OP polonius 56 | 421    
13 Dec 2012  #13
I wonder if anyone who has seen the Polish sitcom 'Londyńczycy' could say how true to life it was. Of course, the sitcom convention leans towards the exaggerated and farcical, but did it contain any grains fo truth? For instance:

-- émigré Poles standing for local office in Britain?
-- setting up businesses of their own rather than just supplying manpower for the UK market?
-- interaction with the Russian mafia?
zetigrek    
13 Dec 2012  #14
-- setting up businesses of their own rather than just supplying manpower for the UK market?

That one is true I know an example of a Pole who set up a business in Ireland. Unfortunately it's no longer running.

PS
Have you abandoned your thread in off-topic section? I'm looking forward for the answer.
Ant63 11 | 403    
13 Dec 2012  #15
'Londyńczycy'

Not seen that one. I'll get the other half to look it up for me.

There are plenty of Polish businesses being set. Some successful, some not. Restaurants, builders, shops and even accountants. I would advise anyone looking for an accountant to get the opinion of an English one as well as a Polish one. Two of my partners friends had to scoot back to Poland as the tax man was coming. Paying £100 a year tax on an average income just isn't going to wash with the tax man here for long especially if you buy flashy cars. You can get away with it for a while, but they usually win.

There is word where I live that the ***** houses are run by the Poles and Russians. I doubt they are working together but have no first hand experience (YUK!). It seems there is a lot of animosity between Russian and Polish males, but not with the females.
TommyG 1 | 361    
14 Dec 2012  #16
There is word where I live that the ***** houses are run by the Poles and Russians. I doubt they are working together but have no first hand experience (YUK!). It seems there is a lot of animosity between Russian and Polish males, but not with the females.

Are you suggesting that the ****** in your area are all Polish or Russian? 'There is word' amounts to hearsay.
Although, you do have some experience with Polish women... Is this how you would describe your partner? I'm sure she'd be flattered at your ignorant comments...

Where did you two meet again? Somewhere locally? Does she get on with the Russian girls...?
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,170    
14 Dec 2012  #17
Maybe that's where he met her... ?
Ant63 11 | 403    
14 Dec 2012  #18
Good morning boys.

I'm sure my partner would be equally amused by your insinuations as I am :-) Every day, you two stoop a little lower.

Are you suggesting that the ****** in your area are all Polish or Russian? 'There is word' amounts to hearsay.

No. I think you will find that certain Poles/Russians have attempted to bring the "NightClub" to England. I'm quite sure there are natives at it locally, but they are not so obvious and don't cruise round in new black Mercedes and black BMW's. The "word" is from the punter delivery service so I would have to deduce from that its reliable.

The rest of your pathetic little post is not worthy of comment.
TommyG 1 | 361    
14 Dec 2012  #19
I'm sure my partner would be equally amused by your insinuations as I am :-)

I'm sure your partner would be equally amused by your own insinuations about Polish women... You are the one making accusations about Polish women not me...

Show her your posts, I'm sure they would be quite an eye-opener for her...
"Oh no, darling I don't mean you; you're different. I just mean all the other girls, excudling ofc your sisters, your mother, your cousins, your friends, etc..."

I think you will find that certain Poles/Russians have attempted to bring the "NightClub" to England

What? Are you crazy? Before 2004 there were no brothels in England?
The oldest profession in the world - brand new to England?
It's funny how all the criminals, pimps, prostitutes, homeless, unemployed and tax-dodgers are always immigrants. It's always the fault of foreigners isn't it?

The "word" is from the punter delivery service so I would have to deduce from that its reliable.

I'm not doubting that you know a lot of men who frequent those places, as you may or may not yourself.
I think you do need to start living in the real world and also hope that your missus accepts your apologies...
Ant63 11 | 403    
14 Dec 2012  #20
You get funnier as the day goes on. Do you not see that everyone else sees your deliberate misinterpretations. Sort the nappy rash it may improve your debating skills. Your on a loser here.
zetigrek    
14 Dec 2012  #21
Guys please, stop it.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
15 Dec 2012  #22
Bit pathetic isnt it, a comment that there are some Polish hookers working in England and the two trolls seem to think the guy means all Polish girls are hookers.....says more about their attitudes to Polish girls TBH.

D--kheads in every country I'm afraid!!!!

Exactly,edit out the bit where I said 8apart from the d**k heads* to make a point? Nah,dont bother,Im not the enemy lol

Very few Polish pubs around, maybe a few in London?

Up here in Ed Millibands constituincy in Doncaster we have on just one street a Polish Deli, Cake Shop,Take Away and a Pub/ Eatery and at least a dozen standard Polski Skleps.

Thats just one street lol,but,I agree,actual Polish Pubs are very rare,they just wouldnt get the footfall when you compare prices in Pubs and the Skleps.

All the old White eagle clubs are long closed down but even those were very intergrated,everyone in the area of one would have their wedding receptions or other parties at them, ww2 era Poles and their kids were just Brits with funny accents and names,of course the kids didnt have the accents,just the scrabble winning names :)
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240    
15 Dec 2012  #23
Personally I think it is a pity, that more don't get involved and that way, most probably their perception of England and English people would change. I think undoubtedly the perception of English people would change if Polish people were more involved in the local community. I don't think that will happen any time soon as there are so many this time round, that its just easier for them to stick to their own.

I moved to England on my own rather than with friends or family and to be honest I never felt the need to cling onto other Polish people just because we came from the same country. I was in my late teens back then and it was nice socialising and making English friends, using my English everyday rather than just at school etc. My then Polish flatmates frowned and disapproved that I was mixing with the locals, we were supposed to stick together because we were Polish and that was that. I mean I can understand why some people feel more comfortable spending time with their fellow countrymen but there's no need to be so close minded about it. I'm sure there are plenty of Polish people out there who enjoy and embrace being part of the English/British community, as well as loads who make a point of not being involved whatsoever. The language barrier is always a problem but in my honest opinion, the English language is so easy to pick up - especially if you live here - that after a couple of years there really should be no excuse.

Polish shops are expensive over here,quite often selling exactly the same stuff as supermarkets except with a Polish label!

I agree with that, while some stuff is reasonably priced, magazines and books still have their Polish price tag on and they charge the same but in GBP haha (1.5zl = £1.5 ;). Still, they offer more choice so I shall be making a list for Christmas :).

The majority of people - Polish, British or other - are surviving, hoping they will still have a job next week, month or next year. Hoping they can afford Xmas

Exactly right!


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