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Warning by Poland's Government before you go to the UK


poland_
14 Jul 2013 #1


Finally the Polish government is warning of the dangers of immigration. It would be good for UK Gov to take example from this and warn the new wave of British migrant workers moving to Poland of the dangers,obstacles and requirements.
Wroclaw Boy
14 Jul 2013 #2
hardly rocket science is it
OP poland_
14 Jul 2013 #3
You and I may not think so, to someone from the boonies in Poland it may just save a life or family.

Do you think you will ever return to Poland on a permanent basis WB, or will it be one foot in one foot out?
jon357 71 | 20,799
14 Jul 2013 #4
You and I may not think so, to someone from the boonies in Poland it may just save a life or family.

True. Desperation about money or a chance to get out of boring as hell small towns still draws a lot of people from PL to UK - and many come a cropper.

A bit melodramatic though and somewhat obvious. Did you see the fake scabs all over that rather camp druggie?
OP poland_
14 Jul 2013 #5
A bit melodramatic though and somewhat obvious. Did you see the fake scabs all over that rather camp druggie?

If he was a druggie live on the streets of London, camp would be the right word many males have to turn to prostitution to make the next meal, I am sure its not the ideal route for your hardy lad from the Polish sticks.
Wroclaw Boy
14 Jul 2013 #6
Do you think you will ever return to Poland on a permanent basis WB, or will it be one foot in one foot out?

probably not, i kinda like the idea of having a holiday property over there but lets face it theres nicer places to buy. We dont really have any reason to visit Poland.

I know a few Poles that have reloacted to the UK recently and are doing well, its easy to see how they do come croppers though.

I wonder what kind of figures are still coming here, still a fair few from what ive observed.
jon357 71 | 20,799
14 Jul 2013 #7
camp would be the right word many males have to turn to prostitution t

Same in Warsaw too. Doesn't make them camp especially.

I am sure its not the ideal route for your hardy lad from the Polish sticks.

I saw a card in a phone box with "Polish my Pole" written on it...
OP poland_
14 Jul 2013 #8
probably not, i kinda like the idea of having a holiday property over there but lets face it theres nicer places to buy. We dont really have any reason to visit Poland

At least you did the Polish thing back in the day, there are so many Brits getting sucked into the Polish dream by the Polish wife, poor buggers turn up here with a pocket full of cash and no idea, two years later they are looking for the exit, its highly probable we will move to the UK over the next 2/3 years as our permanent base, the UK is so easy.

Same in Warsaw too. Doesn't make them camp especially

Not my world Jon, although I do feel for the family unit being destroyed by reckless parents falling ill thought out dreams.
Wroclaw Boy
14 Jul 2013 #9
At least you did the Polish thing back in the day

It was a good move for us back then, we did OK, the property market was booming in 2005 and thats where the pennys came from. We had an easy life for a long time in Poland, virtually immune to the crap that most people experience. I'm sure making up for that now with the amount of work im doing.

Its highly probable we will move to the UK over the next 2/3 years as our permanent base, the UK is so easy.

The squeeze is making it difficult for everybody now - even here, im paying about £2000 a month in friggen bills just to stand still. Youre involved with finance arent you?
jon357 71 | 20,799
14 Jul 2013 #10
Not my world Jon, although I do feel for the family unit being destroyed by reckless parents falling ill thought out dreams.

The ones on the game come from families both good and bad. I know what you mean about 'the dream' though. Far too many people end up in one poky room and a shared kitchen somewhere like Tottenham or FFS, Wigan working for minimum wage or less. The streets are not paved with gold.

there are so many Brits getting sucked into the Polish dream by the Polish wife, poor buggers turn up here with a pocket full of cash and no idea, two years later they are looking for the exit

And those who went in that direction can end up thoroughly miserable in PL, speaking the language badly and no place for them in the jobs market with nothing left for them to do back home either. Or sleeping on a sofa in a grotty Polish flat, only staying here so they can see their kids on access visits.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
14 Jul 2013 #11
there are so many Brits getting sucked into the Polish dream by the Polish wife, poor buggers turn up here with a pocket full of cash and no idea, two years later they are looking for the exit

Absolutely. I've heard of one particularly shocking situation a few weeks ago. I won't go into details because I know at least two people on this forum know the protagonists, but it was a situation where the victim was humiliated and could do nothing about it. If it had been in the UK, it would have been a completely different story.

You forgot to mention that they're looking for the exit without the wife ;)

And those who went in that direction can end up thoroughly miserable in PL, speaking the language badly and no place for them in the jobs market with nothing left for them to do back home either. Or sleeping on a sofa in a grotty Polish flat, only staying here so they can see their kids on access visits.

I would say that anyone over the age of 25 when coming here needs to be very realistic about what Poland has to offer them in the long run. I got an e-mail once from a guy who was over 40 that was looking to move here with his Polish wife - it turned out that her family had essentially told him a load of nonsense about his career prospects here. How often is that story repeated?
legend 3 | 664
14 Jul 2013 #12
Would be wonderful if Brits would leave Poland.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
14 Jul 2013 #13
Why? You live in Canada and have no connection to Poland, so what does it bother you?
legend 3 | 664
14 Jul 2013 #14
More connection to Poland than you ever will.
Hows that Polish coming along? Still cant speak a word. Shame.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
14 Jul 2013 #15
More connection to Poland than you ever will.

Really? That's why you live in Canada and rarely post about any Polish issues at all?

Hows that Polish coming along? Still cant speak a word. Shame.

Coming on just fine, thanks. I work every day with documents in Polish and colleagues who are monolingual Polish speakers - and you?
legend 3 | 664
14 Jul 2013 #16
Really? That's why you live in Canada and rarely post about any Polish issues at all?

Why would I bother? This is a British infested forum.
If I talk about Polish affairs I do so in Polish with Poles and CanPoles.

Coming on just fine, thanks. I work every day with documents in Polish and colleagues who are monolingual Polish speakers - and you?

Thats irrelevant. Youve lived in Poland for god knows how long and still cant write a sentence. Pathetic.
OP poland_
15 Jul 2013 #17
Youre involved with finance arent you?

I was involved in VC for many years, now I am a shareholder in companies. Poland has been very good to us and I very much like the country, I am just tiring of the same old b*llsh*t mentality, its great going to the UK and dealing with people who want to make life easy.

I got an e-mail once from a guy who was over 40 that was looking to move here with his Polish wife - it turned out that her family had essentially told him a load of nonsense about his career prospects here. How often is that story repeated?

It's not only the Brits it is also the PolAms and the PolCans, I am off to view a house this evening, the owners she is Polish, he is American they just want out of PL, he lost his job she has never worked, two kids in the American school and they can't afford the fees for next year, they have decided to go back to the USA and live with his parents, the only asset they have left is a house she inherited from her parents, so they are having a fire-sale. When they arrived 3 years ago, he talked a great story, real life in PL is a b*tch.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
15 Jul 2013 #18
he lost his job she has never worked, two kids in the American school and they can't afford the fees for next year, they have decided to go back to the USA and live with his parents, the only asset they have left is a house she inherited from her parents, so they are having a fire-sale

Ouch. But not an uncommon story I suspect.

I suspect it happens all too often - as you say, people come here talking a good game, but I think you have to have a very realistic head on your shoulders to do well here. I can't imagine moving here with kids that would require expensive private schooling - straight away, you've got a massive burden/responsibility on your shoulders. With the wife not working, he would be under immense pressure - so it's no surprise that it's yet another that is leaving with his tail between his legs.

real life in PL is a b*tch.

For those that haven't done their homework thoroughly, I agree.

Always thought that it was sheer lunacy to turn up here with kids if you didn't have the backing and support of a company. To end up in a situation like you describe can only be the result of poor planning.
Bassem - | 22
15 Jul 2013 #19
it's a shame!
but we can't blame only UK, people should work with a polish government to find a solutions, to make a better environment for these peoples, to stop immigration by create opportunity market in poland, let's stop talking and do something good for new generations.
OP poland_
15 Jul 2013 #20
Always thought that it was sheer lunacy to turn up here with kids if you didn't have the backing and support of a company.

I agree.

The squeeze is making it difficult for everybody now - even here, im paying about £2000 a month in friggen bills just to stand still.

WB,my monthly outgoings are 10,000 Pln per month, we don't have a mortgage to pay and its not inclusive of school fees, car insurance and holidays. So Warsaw it not cheap by any means
jon357 71 | 20,799
15 Jul 2013 #21
Tell me about it. My home has 3.5 metre ceilings and underfloor heating - the bills are macabre. If people come here wanting a 'Western' lifestyle, they'll find it far more expensive that they ever imagined.

I would say that anyone over the age of 25 when coming here needs to be very realistic about what Poland has to offer them in the long run. I got an e-mail once from a guy who was over 40 that was looking to move here with his Polish wife - it turned out that her family had essentially told him a load of nonsense about his career prospects here. How often is that story repeated?

We see it here on this forum a lot. People wanting to work in blue collar or call centre jobs and assuming PL is like the UK but shunted further east. At best they'll be fodder for the kind of language school that pays subsistence wages.

Would be wonderful if Brits would leave Poland.

How would you know? You've never been here.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
15 Jul 2013 #22
Tell me about it. My home has 3.5 metre ceilings and underfloor heating - the bills are macabre. If people come here wanting a 'Western' lifestyle, they'll find it far more expensive that they ever imagined.

This is exactly what I talk about - some preparation goes a hell of a long way. My own heating bills are next to nothing because (don't ask me how) a comprehensive renovation of the block was carried out by one of the neighbours at a very very good price at some point. The end result is that the flat is cool in summer and warm in winter - which strikes me as being highly unusual to begin with.

Of course, the block itself is utterly charmless, but the location and price was right.

We see it here on this forum a lot. People wanting to work in blue collar or call centre jobs and assuming PL is like the UK but shunted further east. At best they'll be fodder for the kind of language school that pays subsistence wages.

Perhaps a sticky should be posted : "DO NOT MOVE TO POLAND TO BE WITH A PARTNER".

A basic rule would be - if you aren't capable of posting a thread with correct punctuation and spelling, then you're unlikely to succeed in Poland unless the inlaws are filthy rich.
OP poland_
15 Jul 2013 #23
Tell me about it. My home has 3.5 metre ceilings and underfloor heating - the bills are macabre

The winter must eat your wallet.

We see it here on this forum a lot. People wanting to work in blue collar or call centre jobs and assuming PL is like the UK but shunted further east

Krakow is the hotbed for those jobs, how can any person have a life in Poland on 3,000 złoty per month

unless the inlaws are filthy rich.

You may get bought out of the relationship. I have two stories about people being offered money to leave their Polish fiancee,one took the money and the other now wishes he had taken the money.
Wroclaw Boy
15 Jul 2013 #24
WB,my monthly outgoings are 10,000 Pln per month, we don't have a mortgage to pay and its not inclusive of school fees, car insurance and holidays. So Warsaw it not cheap by any means

That is one serious drinking habit there mate. What the hell are you paying 10,000 PLN a month for?
OP poland_
15 Jul 2013 #25
What the hell are you paying 10,000 PLN a month for?

2500 Zloty ( building fees)
860 Zloty Health insurance
3,000 Zloty extra classes for 2 kids ( dancing, tennis, Art, french )
800 Zloty Petrol
150 Zloty UPC
2000 Zloty Food,
1,000 Zloty Cleaner

++++ Restaurants, Cineama , theatre, music concerts,

Soon adds up mate.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
15 Jul 2013 #26
3,000 Zloty extra classes for 2 kids ( dancing, tennis, Art, french )

The wise man invests in companies that give such classes.

There's one particular idea in Poland that I think could do very well not just in Poland, but internationally.
OP poland_
15 Jul 2013 #27
The wise man invests in companies that give such classes

Every family I know here in Warsaw sends their kids to extra classes, if only to keep them off the street.
Wroclaw Boy
16 Jul 2013 #28
I was involved in VC for many years,

Those hedge funds were fantastic back in the day for the people managing them and of course the millionaire investors providing the financial muscle. Those corporate beasts played a huge part in negatively effecting the Polish property market. Did you not feel bad that what you were doing was essentially making it even more difficult for the average Pole to buy a property whilst making the overseas already rich investor even more wealthy?
OP poland_
16 Jul 2013 #29
making it even more difficult for the average Pole to buy a property

We invested in companies not residential real estate.
Wroclaw Boy
16 Jul 2013 #30
I thought you would say that, the principle still stands though, parasite company makes more money for already wealthy people.


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