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Mercy flight for dying Polish woman living in the UK


Vincent 9 | 810 Moderator
17 Jun 2009 #1
Some very tragic news today from my local paper and TV, so sad that the victim is so young.

A dying woman will be flown home by helicopter to her native country to see her son for the very last time.

Polish-born Theresa Wasik has been working as a catering manager in Trowbridge and sending money home to her 11-year-old son. But recently she was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer and has been receiving care at Bath's Royal United Hospital.

thisisbath.co.uk/news/Mercy-flight-dying-cancer-woman/article-1082829-detail/article.html
szkotja2007 27 | 1,499
17 Jun 2009 #2
Wings medical group has agreed to fly her back for £6,400, with nurses and doctors volunteering their time. So far about £4,000 has been raised but donations are still pouring in

Well done to the generous people of Bath and Trowbridge.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Jun 2009 #3
It's heartening to see that we can value ONE human life again. For so long, people have been just ticks on a piece of paper and this example gives us hope.

Super work. We should club together and show our humanity!!
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
17 Jun 2009 #4
For so long, people have been just ticks on a piece of paper and this example gives us hope.

Seanus, that isn't true. People all over the world do nice things for others every single day. Saying we are all reduced to "ticks on a piece of paper" status is overdoing it a bit.

Still it's cool someone does something nice for another.
OP Vincent 9 | 810 Moderator
17 Jun 2009 #5
Latest news just in , she will be flown home tomorrow morning. Local people have donated £9000. A little bit of good news is that she will have some time with her son.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Jun 2009 #6
Yes, it is true if you know the British NHS. Don't start with your nonsense, lassie. Just like the 1300 people that died as a result of OCL were just stats. We read more about numbers rather than thinking about the loss of individual life.

Yes, people do good things every day and many are still ticks. Expand your mind, Miss Narrow ;)
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
17 Jun 2009 #7
British NHS.

I thought British NHS was supposed to be good since it's socialized medicine. Are you saying it isn't?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Jun 2009 #8
Socialised medicine???? What are you on about? You read a leaflet from its inception in 1948 when Aneurin Bevan famously said, 'from cradle to the grave'. Thatcher introduced General Management and Compulsory Competitive Tendering which made a mockery of Bevan's vision.

It has its good parts and bad parts now but please ask the British members for specifics. I haven't lived under it for 8 years now. It may have undergone some significant reform in that time.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893
17 Jun 2009 #9
I thought British NHS was supposed to be good since it's socialized medicine. Are you saying it isn't?

It's not what it used to be, more emphasis is put on paperwork, targets and performance, since the Trust system was brought into the equation, a lot of money has been spent in the wrong areas. We are dreafully lacking behind in areas like cervical cancer, mortality rates are high in comparison to other countries in Europe, even though we spend millions a year on research.

I personally have always had fantastic care but there are others that havent :(

Im sure someone will come and tell me I dont know what Im talking about and that it's all singing and dancing but most of my family work in the NHS at one level or another and it's generally a topic that discussed in great depth round the dinner table!

I do think it's nice what the British public have done for that poor lady though, we do have a sense of what is the right thing to do.
Kapusta 2 | 66
17 Jun 2009 #10
Local people have donated £9000.

Good for them. They have given this lady some time with her son and family. Those people should be recognised in the honours lists for their generosity in a time of need and in a time where they gave up some cash that might not necessarily have been spare cash. Good people.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
17 Jun 2009 #11
You'll all hate me for this, but what was stopping the lad from visiting his mother.
niejestemcapita 2 | 561
17 Jun 2009 #12
what was stopping the lad from visiting his mother.

maybe he didnt have a passport..:)
Lir
17 Jun 2009 #13
but what was stopping the lad from visiting his mother.

I thought that for a split second but I then realised she may have other family there but more importantly she has gone back to her home and homeland to die, and that is a very important thing for some Polish people......

:)
Kapusta 2 | 66
17 Jun 2009 #14
Presumably it would be very distressing for her son to be brought to the UK to see his dying mother. I imagine the rest of the family are in Poland. I imagine her wishes were to return to Poland. I assume she wouldn't want her son to be in a distressed state in a country foreign to him with perhaps not many people around to help (people that the boy would know).
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
17 Jun 2009 #15
but more importantly she has gone back to her home and homeland to die,

I think this is the bigger part of it, which I understand fully.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893
17 Jun 2009 #16
Good for them. They have given this lady some time with her son and family. Those people should be recognised in the honours lists for their generosity in a time of need and in a time where they gave up some cash that might not necessarily have been spare cash. Good people.

The Brits give millions a year to charity, Red Nose day and Children in Need being the two main ones, we're quite a generous bunch! Even in hard times.
Arien 3 | 721
18 Jun 2009 #17
It's heartening to see that we can value ONE human life again. For so long, people have been just ticks on a piece of paper and this example gives us hope.

Although it's very sad news, it's really good to know that some people still care..

:')

So yeah, I've got mixed feelings about this!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
18 Jun 2009 #18
That maternal bond is sooooo important. I just wish the Israelis acknowledged the same before they obliterated 750 women and children.

How we should have hung our heads in shame as an international community. That was a massacre!

So, well done here for giving hope to the young boy, that people care. As Tim Robbins convinced Morgan Freeman, 'hope is a good thing'.
convex 20 | 3,978
1 Jan 2010 #19
In the US they have Angel Flight that flies exactly these kinds of missions. They are quite active. I can't find any trace of a similar organization in Europe.

Bristol has quite a bit of private general aviation, it's a shame that there is no volunteer organization wiling to help out.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,769
1 Jun 2012 #20
i don't know how i feel about this, it's bitter-sweet. I hope the bitterness fades quickly, that boy is going to have a unique perspective on things and I hope it's for the better.

One of my closest friends lost his mother at a young age and as sad as it is, in some strange way, it appears to have helped shape him into one of the strongest, most resilient and thoughtful people I know. My hope is that this boy will be able to look at things constructively after the anger subsides.
OP Vincent 9 | 810 Moderator
1 Jun 2012 #21
i don't know how i feel about this, it's bitter-sweet. I hope the bitterness fades quickly, that boy is going to have a unique perspective on things and I hope it's for the better.

I hope so too. As a footnote to this tragic news report, on the day she flew back it was reported the boy had an illness too, which prevented him from traveling.The lady's brother came over from Poland and was by her side on the journey back.


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