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Polish immigration in UK


Zeze 9 | 79
6 Nov 2007 #151
word word word

Enough poles in the UK

send them home

now
Liza 3 | 111
6 Nov 2007 #152
The hard story would have been giving the full details rather than the bare bones..

I could probably qualify as "low-skilled". Though in no way am I an idiot.

Low skilled doesn't mean an idiot, and I apologise if I've given you the impression that I thought that. I don't know how old you are (so please don't get offended), but I understand that a couple of decades ago, it was possible to leave at 15 or 16, and settle in for a job supposedly for life. I understand that the world has changed, and there are some who have experienced bigger changes than others, such as yourself it appears.

Personally, for me, I quite like low-skilled jobs.

Thats a healthy attitude to have; I only wish it was valued more in a financial sense. I really don't understand why the minimum wage is so low, as there are bigger corporates who are making good money who should be spreading a bit more of the wealth around (which is not the fault of the Polish).

Many of those who end up on any worth-while course, are only doing the course because it keeps the Dole off their backs while they sit around scrounging some more, as they're then "in training" and off the Dole count.

I can understand there are some lazy jobsworths who are more interested in massaging the figures, so they put dole bludgers on courses to make them look like active job seekers instead of bums (unfortunately it happens in many countries). Any chance of doing training by correspondence, depending of course on what you would like to do. It does seem as though you're happy to use your brains and you seem smart enough from your posts on here; what about doing a TEFL course, and perhaps teaching English to the Polish in your area (although I'm not sure what the pay rates are for teaching English as a second language in the UK).
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
6 Nov 2007 #153
what nationality are you ZEZE? just curious..

Low skilled doesn't mean an idiot,

no it doesnt, and of course there has to be a balance, people willing to do these jobs
although I think these jobs should have a higher pay, without these harder jobs
and harder workers theres no company..
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893
6 Nov 2007 #154
what nationality are you ZEZE? just curious..

Honey, there is no way that guy is going to give you a straight answer :(
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
6 Nov 2007 #155
I really don't understand why the minimum wage is so low, as there are bigger corporates who are making good money who should be spreading a bit more of the wealth around

doesnt the govt set the minimum wage?

in my opinion an employer can pay more, but with the govt standards saying how much
is enough, do we think they will change this? no. its the same in the states. and people have to have two working adults to actually own a home and or pay rent

and the younger generations cannot afford to leave home until they are out of college
and even then its rough. but we also changed our way of living to.

Honey, there is no way that guy is going to give you a straight answer :(

you are probably right, he may not even come back at all.
Liza 3 | 111
6 Nov 2007 #156
doesnt the govt set the minimum wage?

Yes, and they need to have motivation to change it. I'm not up to date on the number of people receiving the minimum wage in the UK who are eligible to vote, but I would still hazard a guess that there are enough to make a difference. If they were vocal about increases, perhaps then the government would listen. From my experiences in the UK, it seems that the major political parties listen a lot to corporate business, but not to the 'Joe Average' worker. The minimum wage in my native country has doubled in ten years; in the same period for the UK it began at £3.60 (April 1997) and is currently £5.52. If it could rise to £7.20, it would be a great help to the low paid worker in the UK.

but we also changed our way of living to.

It is the same in many countries unfortunately, not just the US or the UK. I do support higher taxes for those in higher income brackets; realistically does someone need a 100k bonus on top of a 400k salary? Perhaps if there was some correlation in company tax in relation to staff wages, it would motivate employers to pay more reasonable wages.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893
6 Nov 2007 #157
doesnt the govt set the minimum wage?

yes they do, it ranges depending a persons age I think the maximum is circa. £5.60 - when you consider the average house costs circa. £250,000 its not that good and not really that easy for a person to have a family, because despite what would we like in an ideal world where everyone had a profession - thats not realistic - so you see, people living under the poverty line is high in the UK, but of course that's their fault because they were destined to be lazy poor brits!.....arrrh well.......
z_darius 14 | 3,968
6 Nov 2007 #158
An interesting article on the impact of Polish immigrants in the UK:
argostranslations.com/articles/poles_in_the_uk
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
6 Nov 2007 #159
so you see, people living under the poverty line is high in the UK, but of course that's their fault because they were destined to be lazy poor brits!

its the same in the states.. the bad thing about that is even immigrants come over
and want to work and those with education will definately get in to higher payed jobs

we have alot of lazy People to, by choice.. who just love to rely on the govt. which
really doesnt hand it out anymore on that silver platter. they created work programs
for the lazy.. :)
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,510
6 Nov 2007 #160
An interesting article on the impact of Polish immigrants in the UK

good article - thanks
Macduff 9 | 69
6 Nov 2007 #161
Shelley.

Its good you are concered by our countrys worries (UK) but the world we live in you have to accept that we as a nation have lived traveld and imigated to the four courners of the globe.

If you like me can not afford the things that the Uk provide then do as others do and move else where the world is getting smaller and smaller and travel is so cheap so vote with your feet.

Do not judge other nationalitys(In the EU) who only wish to make the future of there children better than what theres have been.

I am not against what you are saying but please look at the big picture.
ShelleyS 14 | 2,893
6 Nov 2007 #162
I am not against what you are saying but please look at the big picture.

thats exactly what Im doing, thats why I have my concerns about my country, doesnt mean I have a a "little Islander" attitude.

And Yes Z it was an interesting read, thanks.
Macduff 9 | 69
6 Nov 2007 #163
Shelley never said you had a little Islander attitude, I in my clumbsy way am just asking you to look at this from more angles than just a British one.

from seeeing what you have wrote I truely believe you are a warm and kind person just expressing your concerns
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
6 Nov 2007 #164
the Uk

there should be concerns,, the amount of immigrants exceeds what was thought
and there is housing concerns, jobs concerns.. it isnt like the uk is one huge country
like the united states where people can be asorbed into the economy.. even
Ireland should be a big concern..

the process of immigration was supposed to be slow. I dont think people would
have even minded if it would have happened slower.

I dont blame the polish for wanting better, but they should be feeling the crunch as
well. it cant be good when so many go and the jobs are scarcer then ever due to
overloaded economy!
Macduff 9 | 69
6 Nov 2007 #165
Patrycja

The thing is Jobs are not scarcer than before, just look at this forum Uk employers asking for more Polish people to work on farms,bars and industrial sites! all over the UK.

In Poland they are taking workers from Russia
Liza 3 | 111
6 Nov 2007 #166
In the 1960s and 1970s there was huge amounts of immigration to Australia and New Zealand by Irish, English, Scottish and Welsh nationals, and it impacted on the salaries of Australians and New Zealanders. Those same countries also received large amounts of displaced persons after WWII (which is how most of my family ended up leaving Europe), and during the 70s and 80s, Polynesian Islanders also began chasing the opportunities in New Zealand, and to some extents, Australia. New Zealand is now host to the largest Polynesian city in the world (250,000 plus and counting), and there are now four times as many Niueans in New Zealand than there are in Niue. Both Australia and New Zealand have embraced the opportunities that migrant labour can bring, strengthening their work force, and now have some of the lowest unemployment rates in developed world maintaining strong economic growth. However they do place restrictions on benefits and social housing, in that migrants cannot claim for benefits and housing until they have been there for between two to five years; possibly that might be something Britain could look at?

A study published last week stated that 69% of British people believe that Polish employees work harder than British employees. On the flipside, they came last in a list of nationalities British people would like to spend a weekend with.

For many years, the world has been talking of a ‘global economy’, and now the global economy is coming to the UK, in the form of the EU worker.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
6 Nov 2007 #167
it says "average" not "most people".

I know what 'average' means. But I don't think that 'doctors, engineers and managers' from Poland working in Britain will pull average wage of Polish workers up in these statistics, simply because there is too few of them.
z_darius 14 | 3,968
6 Nov 2007 #168
Good news for UK nationals. Some Poles may be leaving soon and heading to Ireland:
computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9045700
irishdeano 5 | 304
6 Nov 2007 #169
bring them into ireland good. and brillant news about microsoft building another centre here.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
6 Nov 2007 #170
Yes, send them home. And all the problems of the UK will dissapear on the next day.
irishdeano 5 | 304
6 Nov 2007 #171
so then when the lazy uk people dont work they just use the northern ireland tax money. what did the polish ever do u?
they came to ur country and are building it bigger and bring money to ur goverment making the roads better making everything good for you's and you keep bad mouthing them
z_darius 14 | 3,968
6 Nov 2007 #172
And all the problems of the UK will dissapear on the next day.

Be realistic. It will take at least 4 days.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
6 Nov 2007 #173
Ah, right, I didn't take into account weekend.
szarlotka 8 | 2,208
6 Nov 2007 #174
And don't forget our 'business lunches'. I would allow six days to be prudent. Plus contingency - call it a week.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
6 Nov 2007 #175
A study published last week stated that 69% of British people believe that Polish employees work harder than British employees. On the flipside, they came last in a list of nationalities British people would like to spend a weekend with.

Source ?
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
6 Nov 2007 #176
And don't forget our 'business lunches'. I would allow six days to be prudent. Plus contingency - call it a week.

+ hangover (one day).
szarlotka 8 | 2,208
6 Nov 2007 #177
You're right - the picture is looking grim. Please stay Polish people
irishdeano 5 | 304
6 Nov 2007 #178
i would agree that polish would work harder than most british and irish people
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
6 Nov 2007 #179
I already read what you wrote before.

I didn't. What was that ?
anuska 1 | 30
6 Nov 2007 #180
well it wasnt my opinion it was my boyfriends and he said he will log in later and post it again......he said that it did **** him off that some many polish people are coming over here as it took him a year and half to get a job.......he now has a job and found out today that the company he works for has a factory in poland but he cant understand why employ polish people here? And the fact that we struggle as the wages dont stretch that far and we dont run away from problems............... there u go bartolome


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