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Dual nationality: British and Polish


dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
28 Jun 2016  #31
"British to apply for Polish citizenship?" well the crux is that you could probably get as far as polish residency , but to get Polish EU citizenship you will need a language test, it's ok for expat English teachers who know their stuff, but for the average Joe it is a nightmare.
BrexitRefugee - | 11
28 Jun 2016  #32
Of course I know the language requirement is B1 Polish language certificate. I'm asking about the residency requirements. Can anyone clarify this?

Why so many people criticize about British wanting to apply for Polish citizenship. To getting a new citizenship is an diversifying investment for a second passport and culture recognition.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
28 Jun 2016  #33
"Why so many people criticize about British wanting to apply for Polish citizenship."

Hang on there is no way I meant to criticize anyone for applying for citizenship, British are most welcome in Poland, I am not the best person to help you as I have always been a polish citizen, there are others here that will give you more details. This topic has been discussed here many times so if you search you will find out more.

I was only trying to explain that it is hard work to pass the language exam for citizenship that's all.
BrexitRefugee - | 11
28 Jun 2016  #34
Everywhere I searched in this forum or other sites is all about the requirements for non-EU nationals. What I ask is particularly about EU nationals who want to apply for Polish citizenship and I could not find accurate answers so far.

On the other hand, for Polish applying for British citizenship, the law is very clear, you live in Britain for 5 years on the basis of free movement then automatically get permanent residence, then after another 12 months you are eligible.
Dougpol1 27 | 2,641
28 Jun 2016  #35
What I ask is particularly about EU nationals who want to apply for Polish citizenship and I could not find accurate answers so far.

Delph could have helped you. Or you could always click on the right hand side of the main page. And why are you so "desperate" for Polish citizenship, if you are indeed British as you say? It doesn't make any sense, because there is little advantage in it, in fact, only downside as far as I can see.
BrexitRefugee - | 11
29 Jun 2016  #36
Simply I want to secure my EU citizenship and free movement after Brexit. There are too much uncertainties in next 2 years. There are also other advantages for a Polish passport than a British passport if you are a frequent world traveller like me.

1. When travelling in some countries, British passport holder is a dangerous target for kidnapping. Some countries even forbid British to travel independently.
2. For the countries needing visa to travel, British passport is always charged much higher visa fees than other passports.

Remember, just like financial investment, never put eggs in one basket, multi citizenship are definitely better than single citizenship. I'm so jealous the people who have Polish/British dual nationality that they don't need to worry about Brexit. In some cases, that can save your life. For examples, most Jews with dual nationality were able to escape Nazi. Also in a lot of kidnaps, kidnappers chose to kill British and American citizens but not others.
Dougpol1 27 | 2,641
29 Jun 2016  #37
When travelling in some countries, British passport holder is a dangerous target for kidnapping.

Yeah. Have you tried avoiding those countries? You are not British are you? (not that it matters) Ever tried reading the Gov.co.uk website?

If you are one of those delightful Brits that builds prisons in Iraq etc, then it is blood money, and you are leaving yourself open to attack.

Answer - don't go there.
As Dolno suggests, Poland doesn't hand out passports willy-nilly. Good luck with yours (still glad to be British - with a British passport) And I believe you don't have one. Care to prove us wrong?
BrexitRefugee - | 11
29 Jun 2016  #38
I'm a very adventurous traveller who would explore as many countries as I can (so far I'v done just above 100). I don't want what my government have done to other countries make me a victim when travelling abroad as I never agreed and supported my government's actions.
Dougpol1 27 | 2,641
29 Jun 2016  #39
I don't want what my government have done to other countries make me a victim when travelling abroad

Fair enough. I wouldn't risk it myself, as we know that Britain cares nothing for its' citizens abroad. You will only get a Polish citizenship if you have lived here a number of years and paid into the system. Even then, like in Britain, you have to undergo testing, and personally, I wouldn't lower myself.

I don't have a Polish driving licence, because I don't want to be associated with Polish drivers. And I don't want a Polish passport - because I am British and shall remain so, even if I am not proud to be British as of now. I accept that others may feel differently, but it's a mercenary thing from my viewpoint to grab another country's passport.
Slickety - | 1
29 Jun 2016  #40
it's a mercenary thing from my viewpoint to grab another country's passport

You are of course entitled to your view, and I am new to this forum, but I think you are being a bit harsh.

One of the reasons that I am now considering applying for a Polish passport (was born in London to a Polish mother) is the past few days have fundamentally changed Britain's relationship with Europe. Until now as a British citizen, I have also always been a European citizen, with the ability not just to travel to but also to live in other countries (in my case Belgium and Germany). My Polish heritage was part of my European identity and whether or not I had paperwork specifically associating me with that aspect of my European-ness was less relevant.

Now that has changed. The country in which I have lived most of my life has decided to turn away from Europe. But I haven't. And if I now need additional documentation to continue to assert that I am a European, am I really being mercenary or am I simply choosing to maintain what I have always been? I only feel sorry for other British Europeans that aren't as fortunate.

So with that in mind, dolnoslask - if you could PM details of your experience, I'd be grateful.
Dougpol1 27 | 2,641
29 Jun 2016  #41
was born in London to a Polish mother)

Of course you have very right to a Polish passport. * I was addressing Brexitt and other "opportunists." I am British, and I don't see how this effects people's rights.

Especially as the new British PM will be forced to backtrack:))))
*PS. Not sure what the rules are though. If the situation were reversed, the father has to be British.
10iwonka10 - | 401
29 Jun 2016  #42
What I ask is particularly about EU nationals who want to apply for Polish citizenship and I could not find accurate answers so far.

It is irrelevant if you are UE or non-UE citizen. You should have been living in Poland for minimum 3 years ( or 2 if married to polish citizen)

mswia.gov.pl/pl/bezpieczenstwo/obywatelstwo-i-repatri/cudzoziemcy/10169,SPOSOBYNABYCIAOBYWATELSTWAPOLSKIEGO.html
babchiabrit
29 Jun 2016  #43
hi dolnoslask

i am a retired uk citizen. my father was in the polish forces and then an raf airman, now deceased, and brought up the family in england. my mother is english. i have some of my father's papers. i also am interested in obtaining a polish passport, for several reasons. sorry to add to your workload but i would be very grateful if you could send me the info that relates to this process, please.

thank you.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
29 Jun 2016  #44
babchiabrit No worries create a proper user account and I will pm you how i did it.
BrexitRefugee - | 11
29 Jun 2016  #45
10iwonka10:

The law says 3 years on the basis of (many residence permits for non-EU nationals and permanent residence but no mention about EU free movement).

My concern is whether EU nationals need to have permanent residence (which automatically obtained after 5 years under EU treaties) first then 3 years after permanent residence, that makes actual residency requirement 8 years (5+3).
10iwonka10 - | 401
29 Jun 2016  #46
udsc.gov.pl/en/cudzoziemcy/obywatele-panstw-trzecich/chce-osiedlic-sie-w-polsce/zezwolenie-na-pobyt-rezydenta-dlugoterminowego-ue

another link in English- I am not sure if I understand it correctly but 5 years to be granted permanent residence in UE. Minimum 2 years of it Poland to get residence in Poland .

No it does not add up as 3+5.
I understand that you have to be minimum 3 years in Poland to apply for citizenship. You could be 2 years somewhere in UE than 3 in Poland so you have residence and also can apply for citizenship.
BrexitRefugee - | 11
29 Jun 2016  #47
Because Polish law does not explicitly say 3 years on the basis of free movement treaties. That's where confuses come from. That can be interpreted in many ways. You can simply say 3 years is enough as EU nationals don't need permit to reside like non-EU nationals. But you can also say you need to have PR first as PR is explicitly mentioned in the law and only 5+3 can fulfill the requirement (3 years on the basis of PR).

To obtain PR automatically after 5 years of residence is from the EU treaties that apply to all EU countries. On the other hand, British law makes it very clear, you have to have PR for 1 year to apply British citizenship even for EU nationals even the minimal residency requirement is 5 years. That makes the actual requirement 6 years (5+1).

So it really needs official clarification or people who have applied as EU nationals to share their experience.
10iwonka10 - | 401
29 Jun 2016  #48
You can simply say 3 years is enough as EU nationals don't need permit to reside like non-EU nationals

I think this interpretation is correct. You can ask different people on forum but I would suggest phoning them- there is 'kontakt' on this web.This way you will be 100% sure and clear about your situation.
PolishLawGuide
29 Jun 2016  #49
So it really needs official clarification or people who have applied as EU nationals to share their experience.

It's clarified in law.

EU/EEA/CH citizens must be legally resident here for 5 years, with no more than a 6 month break in that time to apply for permanent residency. You must hold the "Certificate of Residence of an EU citizen" to begin the clock.

After that, you are required to wait 3 years before applying for Polish citizenship.

Time is shortened for those living here on the basis of marriage to a Polish citizen, both for applying for permanent residency and for citizenship. You need 3 years marriage to a Polish citizen, with at least 2 years residence in Poland in order to apply for permanent residency. Citizenship is also available after 2 years as a permanent resident.

Permanent residency is not granted automatically. You are required to hold the "Certificate of Residence of an EU citizen" first, and then you must apply for permanent residency.

Rules are identical for EU and non-EU citizens, only the application process is simplified in the case of EU citizens.

In addition, there is currently no way to obtain the B1 certificate required for citizenship.
10iwonka10 - | 401
29 Jun 2016  #50
This description applies only for non-EU person. If someone was born in UK/Germany/France.....she/he is resident of EU since birth so he/she needs only 3 years in Poland to apply for citizenship.

That what was original question about.

EU/EEA/CH citizens must be legally resident here for 5 years, with no more than a 6 month break in that time to apply for permanent residency.

I think this only relates to non EU citizen who stayed in EU country for 5 years and can apply for permanent residence.
BrexitRefugee - | 11
30 Jun 2016  #51
So totally 3 years, 5 years or 8 years?

The core question is for EU-nationals, which one is the requirement for citizenship?

1. 3 years AFTER Certificate of Residence (3+0)
2. 3 years AND Permanent Residence (5+0)
3. 3 years AFTER Permanent Residence (3+5)
10iwonka10 - | 401
30 Jun 2016  #52
3 years for EU person.

This 5 years permanent residence is for non EU citizens- For instance Chinese lives in Poland for 5 years- then applies for permanent residence.IT means he can live and work in Poland. But this work permission relates only to Poland as he applied there.

If you are EU it is 3 years.
BrexitRefugee - | 11
5 Jul 2016  #53
I really doubt it's 3 years, sounds too good to be true. All other EU countries have at least 5 years requirements for citizenship, some even require 10 years. Considering Poland is not a country having many immigrants, I doubt it can have much less residency requirements than other EU countries.
10iwonka
6 Jul 2016  #54
polish-citizenship/foreigners.html

As above :

I am not sure if so many people from EU applies for Polish citizenship :-)

Plus- fluent polish is required.
StevD - | 5
14 Jul 2016  #55
I am also looking into acquiring a Polish passport via my parents who were Polish. I would be grateful if dolnoslask could also PM me some tips as to how he did it.
jon357 64 | 14,382
14 Jul 2016  #56
I am not sure if so many people from EU applies for Polish citizenship :-)

Very few; simply because there's no need. Most applicants are from outside the EU/EAA, especially Ukraine, Belarus etc..

Plus- fluent polish is required.

You need to pass a government exam at B1 level; easy enough for people who use Polish daily.
jerekuk - | 1
27 Jul 2016  #57
Hello dolnoslask,
I am another UK born citizen of parents born in what was then or is now Poland. Father joint Polish army of exile and mother deported by Russians but both arrived in UK after the war as refugees and lived here until their deaths, but never applied for UK citizenship. I am approaching retirement and wish to be able to visit and reside in any EU country. Please pm details of how to apply for Polish Citizenship. Thank you for such a useful forum.

I wish to make the point that after Brexit a UK citizen already resident in another EU country, say France, could have established right to residence and may not be effected. However, if that person decided they wanted to move to, say Spain, they would not have a right to residence or work. But if the had dual citizenship with at least one being EU, say Poland, then they would retain the right after Brexit.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
27 Jul 2016  #58
jerekuk "with at least one being EU, say Poland, then they would retain the right after Brexit."

Correct , also If you get a Polish passport your children will also be able to confirm their citizenship, so no future Brexit problems.

Anyway have sent you an email explaining how I got my citizenship confirmed.
Golden truth
31 Jul 2016  #59
If you are a British national and wants Polish passport you must live 3yrs in Poland while married to a Polish national and write the Polish citizenship test or language test.

If you are an Eu National you must live in the UK for at least 5 hrs to apply for uk permanent residency or indefinite to leave after getting that you can apply for British passport after one of getting the residency. ..

As for getting Polish passport is the tricky bit Polish language is very difficult. ...
For those with relatives ,dad ,mother with Polish passport....just apply in the nearnest Polish consulte ..that's the biggie ..easy sweet ride home to get a Polish passport.....fortunate ...I got mine
StevD - | 5
31 Jul 2016  #60
It is not as simple as applying in the nearest Polish consulate for citizenship if you have Polish parents. Due to a change of the law in Poland, while the consulate will accept your initial application, all replies from the relevant authorities in Poland will only be made to an address in Poland. This was done to ease the workload of the consulates. Furthermore, no certificates etc will be sent abroad or via the consulates. If you don't have contacts in Poland to act as go-betweens then the process is anything but straightforward.


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