The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / UK, Ireland  % width posts: 60

Let's discuss Polish and British, only constructive (though we will digress)


hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
24 Apr 2010 #31
Anyway, another salient point is that we both excel in science. Information sharing and working for the collective benefit of mankind is a noble pursuit when discussing this area. Let life not be a competition but a collaborative project.

Here is a perfect example Seanus

guardian.co.uk/technology/2009/apr/22/obituary-olgierd-zienkiewicz

The eminent Anglo-Polish civil engineer Olgierd "Olek" Zienkiewicz, who has died aged 87, devoted his distinguished career to using a computer-based method for the design and analysis of engineered systems, such as dams, automobiles, aircraft, medical and electronic devices. The "finite element method" (FEM) of computer-aided engineering breaks down complex and apparently insoluble problems into pieces for which equations can be used to arrive at approximate solutions. Those local solutions can then be combined to arrive at global approximate solutions.

Olek was born in Caterham, Surrey, the son of a Polish father and an English mother. When he was two, the family moved to Poland, where they remained, mostly in Katowice, until the beginning of the second world war. It was in Poland that Olek received his early education, with an emphasis on the sciences and mathematics. In 1939 he was in Warsaw preparing for admission to university when the war began. He participated in the early defence of Warsaw, but returned to Katowice when the family received visas to travel through Italy into France. Eventually they joined a Polish ship sailing to Plymouth. The family settled in London, where Olek was provided with scholarships for his university studies at Imperial College.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
24 Apr 2010 #32
He will have received a good education in Katowice as they excel in Economics and Maths there. I know because I live about 20 mins by car from there and have discussed the city with many students.

The exotic flavour is another boon for Brits. My grandad, a truly great man if ever I knew one, took an interest in the staff in the hotel near him. One time there was an Estonian serving us and the other, a Polish girl. It provides contrast and I can fully understand as meeting foreigners has always been sth I have liked to do. The fact that I could speak Polish to her helped but she only wanted to speak English, so that was fine.

All it needs is a little pushing and ties can be forged.
king polkacanon - | 57
24 Apr 2010 #33
English dislike naturally Slavic style qualities.They don't say a word about Russians because they bring them money.
One should also keep in mind that Germanics change completely behaviour when being at the countries in question and there tend to be extremely friendly(for the obvious gains).Not in their own country though.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
24 Apr 2010 #34
The million or so Poles who have come here in the past five years definitely came to work.

Can you back that up with proof, because all the Brits I know that went to Aus did so to go to jobs equal or better than they had here i.e. all professionals - not to clean toilets or cleaning houses.

Perhaps they should be deported as it is being done in Australia when someone commit a crime.

We have a rule that if someone has a sentence less than 12 months then they are free to stay, personally I'd send them back if they committed any type of crime no matter how trivial with no chance of returning.

Borysiewicz, a Welsh-Polish doctor by training,

So he's British then?

Sir Leszek Krzysztof Borysiewicz, KBE, FRS, FRCP, FRCPath, FMedSci (born 13 April 1951) is a British physician

Please dont try and make out that new Poles are taking prominent positions in the UK, because its simply not true, there's also some MP that has a Polish name, he's probably never lived there and was no doubt educted here same as Borysiewicz! What it does show, is that earlier generations integrated and did well, it was probably easier to do since they were in smaller numbers and the namby pamby attitude we have now was not in place.

English dislike naturally Slavic style qualities.They don't say a word about Russians because they bring them money.
One should also keep in mind that Germanics change completely behaviour when being at the countries in question and there tend to be extremely friendly(for the obvious gains).Not in their own country though.

Pray tell how you are qualified to make such remarks, you've met a few drunk slappers in some holiday resort in Greece.
southern 75 | 7,096
24 Apr 2010 #35
a few drunk slappers

English girls are funny.I miss these resorts.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
24 Apr 2010 #36
They like to have a good time, nothing wrong with that..But it doesnt quantify you last post.
SouthMancPolak - | 104
24 Apr 2010 #37
English girls are funny.I miss these resorts.

There's nothing wrong with English girls, Polish women are too thin anyway.
southern 75 | 7,096
24 Apr 2010 #38
But it doesnt quantify you last post.

What do you mean?About westerners disliking slavic character?Or about different behaviour in their country and abroad?A lot of course depends how you appear.For example I noticed that when I was with my parents I received a much better treatment in Germany than when I was alone.It seems Germans appreciate families etc.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
24 Apr 2010 #39
What do you mean

English dislike naturally Slavic style qualities

This in particular.

To say that all English peolpe dislike Slavic qualities when most English people have no idea or the inclination to find out what "Slavic qualities" are, is absurd quite frankly.
southern 75 | 7,096
24 Apr 2010 #40
I would formulate this like ''as far as I noticed during my stay in Germany Germans dislike certain slavic charcteristics and since English are close to Germans in mindset I find it likely they also dislike them.''

I mean it is what BB has said:''We know you,now the rest of Europe starts getting to know you etc.''
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
24 Apr 2010 #41
since English are close to Germans in mindset I find it likely they also dislike them.

Possibly, we both re-built our countries to a good standard after WWII and have been invaded by immigrants ever since! Not knowing ANY Germans personally I cant really say if we are like them or not on a personal level...but Im sure we're alike in some ways and not in others..Both great nations everyone wants to live in! I dont actually have any issues with Germans and will hopefuly visiting Germany for the first time in a couple of months..I'll let you know when I get back if I feel we are the same or not.

I mean it is what BB has said:''We know you,now the rest of Europe starts getting to know you etc.''

Im sure you took that out of context, BB is a sweetie and a valued member on here - Id buy him a beer if I ever met him.
king polkacanon - | 57
25 Apr 2010 #42
Yes,this commonappreciation between English and Germans is problematic.I was surprised to find out how much Germans disrespect US while they appreciate English.I thought it was the opposite.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
25 Apr 2010 #43
Well, they are our ancestors...and like the French (food and lang) and the Romans (latin lang and food we took something from them..but let us not forget the raiders..(Scandinavians)..we took words and food and why do you think we have blonde hair and certain looks on the island..Southern..My Island has been raided and raped and pilaged and occupied over centuries...We are what we are! I love my history..its rich! bar the last hundred years it was 99.9% European and they brought something cultural to the table and enhanced my Island - but now...its utopia for 3rd world immigrants and ill educated Eastern Europeans..
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542
25 Apr 2010 #44
.but let us not forget the raiders..(Scandinavians)..we took words and food and why do you think we have blonde hair and certain looks on the island..Southern..My Island has been raided and raped and pilaged and occupied over centuries...

*tries to walk away in silence hoping Amathyst won't notice him*

Except for the NBP people, are there any more sectors of the society that knows about the contribution the Poles gave GB during WW2 (BoB)?

Also would it been a good idea to inform/promote information about Scot's immigrating to Poland long time ago? It would been an odd twist, an old Scott immigrant migrating back to Britain :)

(Then hear go home! "Weren't I coming home?! Huh?!) xD
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
25 Apr 2010 #45
Can you back that up with proof, because all the Brits I know that went to Aus did so to go to jobs equal or better than they had here i.e. all professionals - not to clean toilets or cleaning houses.

You are looking at it! These aren't my words they are from the article I posted.

Borysiewicz, a Welsh-Polish doctor by training,

Again not my words read the article! (So he's British then?) How on earth would you know what he consider himself to be? (What it does show, is that earlier generations integrated and did well) Indeed and that is precisely the purpose of my post, so stop nitpicking!
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
25 Apr 2010 #46
How on earth would you know what he consider himself to be?

He was born here, raised here and was educated here..how else would he see him self? God am I supid or are you ?

Indeed and that is precisely the purpose of my post, so stop nitpicking!

No it was not or your response to your last pargraph would have been different.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
26 Apr 2010 #47
He was born here, raised here and was educated here..how else would he see him self? God am I supid or are you ?

Well the article suggests otherwise, but you presumably know better though?

your response to your last pargraph

I tend not to respond to myself, again a total failure to follow your own reasoning, seriously you should she some one. Logic seems to be your weak point or is it that time of the month?
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
26 Apr 2010 #48
He was born here, raised here and was educated here..how else would he see him self?

Would you say the same about some african born to african parents in the UK? Would he become English too?

;)

Sir Leszek Krzysztof Borysiewicz, KBE, FRS, FRCP, FRCPath, FMedSci (born 13 April 1951) is a British physician

Hes of Polish blood and ancestry. The brits always do this, they even try and claim Colin Farrell as their own.

His family emigrated to the UK post WW2, but, he is a lot more Polish than he was British. "Jesus was born in a stable, doesnt make him a horse".
andyl - | 2
26 Apr 2010 #49
The borders to europer are now open for people to travel around so it doesnt take a rocket scientist to work out that the undesirables from foreign countries are going to travel about where they arent known and commit crime.

This is the case in most countries however England has far too many immigrants coming into the country who just want to sponge off the state.

Its all a joke i dont mind people chasing a dream and wanting to get on but they should learn the language of where they are living and integrate not expect to setup their own communities.

The english are prime examples of this in places like Spain. Who the hell wants an english breakfast in 100 degree heat :-)
Arien 3 | 721
26 Apr 2010 #50
Who the hell wants an english breakfast in 100 degree heat :-)

I know, I'd prefer a milkshake aswell.

Now, where's that crazy cow when you need him?
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
26 Apr 2010 #51
Who the hell wants an english breakfast in 100 degree heat :-)

Me!!!! I prefer eating local though when you live away from home for so long, a good English breaky is right up my street :D
Mister H 11 | 761
1 May 2010 #52
There is great potential for parternship, if only the arrogance and stereotypes are dropped. Breaking the linguistic barrier helps too as it allows you to tap into their way of thinking. The problem is that idiots will always ruin things and turn it into a competition but common ground is there to be found.

Unless the Government take action to limit the numbers and calm things down a bit, I don't see things changing.

For as long as the Polish (or anyone from another country for that matter) can come here for purely economic reasons and end up better off from "The System" than many British people, it will never work.

I'm a great fan of fair play and more British people are too. Uncontrolled and unlimited immigration is not fair.

I hope that once the cuts start and the benefit money starts to run out and people have to come to the UK for more reasons than just money, things might start to change.

The only way immigration will work is for there to be less immigrants (and I'm not saying no immigrants at all) and for there to be less of a strain on local resources. The longer that the British are made to feel almost in competition with the Polish and others, the longer we will be poles apart (if you pardon the pun).
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
1 May 2010 #53
For as long as the Polish (or anyone from another country for that matter) can come here for purely economic reasons and end up better off from "The System" than many British people, it will never work.

That is not the reason, the reason why they won't work is because they are effin LAZY, and the system is is to generous. what is more they have a fifth column in their own country that is determined to belittle all its achievements and drag the whole country down, it is called the Labour Party.

ill educated Eastern Europeans..

Like i just pointed out they are more educated than the natives.
guzzler 1 | 88
1 May 2010 #54
Like i just pointed out they are more educated than the natives.

I take offence at the way you generalise about British people I have three children all highly educated girls. My eldest daughter is a consultant at a large teaching hospital in London my second daughter is a partner in a very large IT company and my youngest is doing her Masters

all educated in England. Most of their friends are English as they are and all in similar positions my daughters were fortunate that I had money but a lot of their friends came from less fortunate homes. For example my eldest daughters boss who is the senior consultant at the hospital his father was a porter. I would suggest you be more careful what you post you might upset more people then me with your silly generalisations.
pawian 161 | 9,971
10 Oct 2019 #55
many Poles reckon they are the best at so many things.

Yes. In 1990s, when Poles started to travel extensively looking for work abroad, I heard stories about versatile Poles who could do any manual job, much to foreginers` utter surprise. A driver who took us to schools in the countryside for afternoon courses went to Italy for summer employment and found it in a local factory. There he worked at the direct production line but also dealt with electrical repairs and mechanics of broken forklifts. Italian workmates were flabbergasted seeing it.

Now a fundamental question arises: Is it better to be good at everything, but lacking real professional quality than to be a true specialist in only one field?
Miloslaw 6 | 2,560
10 Oct 2019 #56
: Is it better to be good at everything, but lacking real professional quality

An interesting question.
I think that it depends on the work involved.
At the highest level, specialist knowledge is the most important thing.
At the lowest level, a wide range of skills is more important.
The Poles i have seen come to Britain since 2004 were mainly of the lower level.
Their success is down to their flexibility,wide knowledge of basic skills, hard work ethic and being prepared to work for relatively low pay.
Romanians are now trying to replace them but the only things they have over the Poles is working even harder than Poles for even lower wages,

They don't have the skills or knowledge of the Poles.
Sadly, at the upper end, we have relatively few Poles coming here.
If they are really clever, they will go to the USA.
pawian 161 | 9,971
10 Oct 2019 #57
Yes, I think these are accurate remarks.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
11 Oct 2019 #58
If they are really clever, they will go to the USA.

Same goes for a lot of Europeans, really. I know an incredibly bright British guy who was practically dragged over to the US, as the company had seen his MSc thesis and wanted his know-how on the topic. A year later, he was called by a professor at MIT who told him bluntly that they wanted him there, and so he ended up on a PhD with a six-digit scholarship on top.

I've always admired the way that the Americans will pay for talent and won't hesitate to do so. It's such a different mentality to Europe, where only the Swiss really seem to understand that you need to pay a high price for quality work.
Miloslaw 6 | 2,560
11 Oct 2019 #59
So true.
One thing Americans understand better than Europeans is how to take advantage of true talent.
In Europe we tend to reward "jobsworths", the people who just tow the line, do as they are told and don't think for themselves.
TheOther 5 | 3,872
12 Oct 2019 #60
the way that the Americans will pay for talent and won't hesitate to do so.

Depends. A lot of talent was brought into the country with the help of H1B visa, and these people were often used to undermine local wage levels. H1B's are now (rightfully) under so much scrutiny that it will have some serious impact on attracting talent to the US.


Home / UK, Ireland / Let's discuss Polish and British, only constructive (though we will digress)
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.