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Brits or Poles more eager to try new foods?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467    
7 Jul 2011  #1
In your opinion, which of the two are more adventurous from a culinary point of view? I don't know of any studies but everyone can have an impression as to whether the typical Brit or Pole of similar age, education and occupation would be more or less inclined to try unusual or exotic foreign dishes?

Many Brits are turned off by sour milk, head cheese, tripe, jellied pig trotters and black pudding (kaszanka) a to mention but a few.
JonnyM 11 | 2,622    
7 Jul 2011  #2
Many Brits are turned off by sour milk, head cheese, tripe, jellied pig trotters and black pudding (kaszanka) a to mention but a few.

Pigs' trotters and black pudding are part of standard British cuisine and tripe and brawn (head cheese) are regional specialities in parts of the UK. Sour milk is rightly ignored.
britgirl    
7 Jul 2011  #3
black pudding (kaszanka

what on earth do u mean? we LOVE black pudding..:)
alexw68    
7 Jul 2011  #4
It's largely a question of exposure. Many older Brits (50+) find Chinese, Thai, Indian restaurants etc 'normal' but these places have been round for 40 years. They've been on the Polish scene (outside eg Warsaw, anyway) for a lot less time - younger people therefore are the most usual customers.

That said, my 72-year-old Scots (Glasgow) landlord back in London doesn't even stretch to lasagne.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
7 Jul 2011  #5
Many Brits are turned off by sour milk, head cheese, tripe, jellied pig trotters and black pudding (kaszanka) a to mention but a few.

Many may be,but your mistake in that list is that everyone of those has a native British equivalent.not sure about "sour milk" though,isnt that just off milk?ie,nasty smelly stuff that aliens get drunk on....

But thats another thing,those would be considered "national" food in Poland,in the UK they would be far more regional, Black pudding would be North West england,Tripe seems to be a Yorkshire thing(tho Id never touch it! )jellied anything seems a london thing and,well,we have more types of cheese than the french so....

Poles IMHO seem to be far more reluctant to try new foods. Lets just look at how popular Polski Skleps still are over here. There isnt a small town or neighbourhood in the UK that doesnt have a Polski Sklep these days,even TESCOS still has a Polish foods aisle.

Of course,flip side is all the Brits who go on holiday to Spain etc and eat "English breakfasts " every day and stick to pub grub rather than local stuff.....

Id still say us Brits have the edge on a far wider cuisine,"exotic" in warsaw seemed to be pierogi Russian style......where as for the last 40 or 50 years here in the UK its been normal for a weeks worth of meals to have come from the 4 corners of the world, Spag Bol on a Monday,Curry on a Tuesday a kebab after work on a Wednesday, etc etc,Sunday Roast is about the only "Native" Dish regularly eaten so....

Who knows,in the end its one of those questions that will go round and round. Im not keen on many Polish foods but the ones Im not keen on are like the ones you mentioned,fatty greasy slimey stuff I dont eat here or abroad but elsewhere I always eat and drink Local ( and smoke too,always buy the local cigarettes) and will try anything once,but my hypothetical english neighbour( I do have one...just,you know..) might be the type who never touches any foreign "muck" and always packs some cornflakes and some bacon rashers in his holiday suitcases :)

please try not to get around the filters
Daisy 3 | 1,228    
7 Jul 2011  #6
jellied anything seems a london thing

I remember watching my grandmother make jellied eels, they still wiggle when you cut them up, even though they are supposed to be dead :(
And, I remember watching my dad make brawn, you don't want to know what goes in there
PennBoy 76 | 2,438    
7 Jul 2011  #7
jellied pig trotters

I see them in a supermarket I run.
I'll give anything a shot was a late bloomer with trying Indian food, never again, the curry just tastes awful to me.



Marynka11 4 | 675    
7 Jul 2011  #8
I have to admit, I'm not very adventurous when it comes to organ meat. Tripe and liver is where I draw the line. But I will try any veggie, any fruit, any grain, and any cheese no matter how stinky it is.
joepilsudski 26 | 1,391    
7 Jul 2011  #9
Forget organ meat for me.

My mother used to cook up kidneys, liver for my dad back in the day.

One day I came home and she was boiling kidneys, and, although I had smelled them cooking before, the smell hit me that time...I asked her whether someone had taken a p*ss in the kitchen.

Mom also used to make czarnina, with home made kluski...I used to eat it until I found out what it was...Afterwards she was upset: "You always loved it when I made czarnina'...Yeah, well, ignorance was bliss.

The head cheese, no...Jellied eels?...She never cooked those, although I noticed they were popular when I lived in the UK.

Can't even eat liverwurst, and I used to enjoy a sandwich with that, raw onions, mustard.

A substantial portion of the older African-American population enjoy chittlins (pig intestines) usually boiled then deep fried...Can't go for that either.

Working class populations worldwide prepare all these organ meats in different ways.

Asians will cook anything that moves.
Seanus 15 | 19,716    
7 Jul 2011  #10
It's a question that is hard to answer for the simple reason that Brits are raised with far more food options due to its MC nature. Even in my home city of Aberdeen which only has 210,000 people, there are many more types of cuisine than in Gliwice, a city of similar population here. All in all, I'd say Brits are more likely to experiment as Poles have more of their own foods that they prefer.
sobieski 107 | 2,129    
7 Jul 2011  #11
Being Flemish I have an outsider's view, but I doubt if anybody in Europe besides a part of the Poles can stomach "karp".

In the seven years I live in Warsaw I could not. And I am grateful my mother-in-law serves salmon on Christmas Eve :)
Also "galaretka z octem" :((((
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
8 Jul 2011  #12
please try not to get around the filters

Huh?????? Does this strange and puzzling post have anything to do with my reply going from being the first reply to becoming about 4th?
Any explanation beyond a cryptic message in Red? Ie, who wrote that in red? What do you mean? What filters? genuinly puzzled................
JonnyM 11 | 2,622    
8 Jul 2011  #13
What filters?

Exactly. It isn't as if you were discussing Spam Fritters...
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
8 Jul 2011  #14
Exactly

maybe I got more colourfull in my description of sour milk now I think about it..................I do try and avoid that out side of off topic so if thats the case....could Mods maybe "man up" and put their name to their work? Would make things less puzzling and easier to get to the bottom of,failing that,maybe remember that not everyone spends all day working on line and terms like those used are not instantly obvious to everyone.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085    
8 Jul 2011  #15
Poles IMHO seem to be far more reluctant to try new foods.

In general, I'd say yes. That'll apply to working class, usually conservative, that got used to their menus, earning modest wages, so rather rarely eating out. However, I think that more and more Poles in Poland (new restaurants and takeaways opening) and abroad (restaurants and takeaways and well-supplied food shops) try something new.

even TESCOS still has a Polish foods aisle

I don't know about their sizes in your area, but in mine they're rather small or don't exist, Polish foods are just mingled with others.

Lets just look at how popular Polski Skleps still are over here.

It's an opportunity for the Brits to try something new, too.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
8 Jul 2011  #16
I don't know about their sizes in your area

Well,they tried a full aisle but so many specialist Polish shops opened up in the Doncaster area that they have now scaled down to 1/4 of an aisle but thats still genuine Polish brands,they missed the trick about fresh bread though,the small shops caught on and for once little shops have beaten the evil empire,Yay! :)

It's an opportunity for the Brits to try something new, too.

for sure it is,my old mum is now addicted to pierogi serem (?sweet cheese?) :)

In general, I'd say yes. That'll apply to working class, usually conservative

Same for UK,probably universal to be fair.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085    
8 Jul 2011  #17
for sure it is,my old mum is now addicted to pierogi serem (?sweet cheese?) :)

I bought them, but I don't really like them sweet, they're supposed to be savoury, with melted smalec (proper Polish lard), fried onion bits and skwarki :)

,they missed the trick about fresh bread though,the small shops caught on and for once little shops have beaten the evil empire,Yay! :)

Yeah, good for you, I only noticed one type of Polish bread in a local Morrisons, imported from as far as, IIRC, Manchester.


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