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British or polish Passport ' Advice feedback


Wayman 3 | 36
19 May 2010  #1
cześć or hello forum'

my partner an myself are exspecting are first child due to be born in late september ' I Wanted to get some advice on if given the choice would the forum members prefer for there child to be born in the UK or Poland 'The wife to be is polish an we intend on leaving before the baby is due but that means a lot of rushing around with little time left ' Given the choice what would forum members who live in poland an live in britain do 'Myself i am british ' so if the child is born here she gets a british passport and if we decide to leave before the baby is due an the baby is born in poland then she will have polish papers ' We will be leaving all being well within a few months of the baby being born as i an the mother wish for the little one to grow up in Poland rather than here in the city of London ( live 10 minutes away from where that poor polish lad was recently stabbed an died )

there are so many reasons why i wish for the little one to grow up in Poland ' so we are going to leave it,s just either now or arfter ,Thanks for your feedback
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
19 May 2010  #2
the baby is born in poland then she will have polish papers

As I understand things: You will have until the child is five years old to claim a British passport.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
19 May 2010  #3
You will have until the child is five years old to claim a British passport.

No, not at all. You can claim it whenever you want - unlike certain countries, Britain has no time limit on the claiming of British citizenship.

To the original poster - it really doesn't matter. She'll be a dual citizen from birth, as British citizenship will pass to her from you and Polish citizenship from the mother, irrespective of birthplace.

In terms of bureaucracy surrounding the birth - it'll be slightly easier to have the child in Poland if you intend to live there.
OP Wayman 3 | 36
19 May 2010  #4
As I understand things: You will have until the child is five years old to claim a British passport.

Spoke to the passport office today here in London fella on the phone said same as u but he did say it,s just harder to obtain ' in Poland than here from what i gather .
Harry
19 May 2010  #5
She'll be a dual citizen from birth, as British citizenship will pass to her from you and Polish citizenship from the mother, irrespective of birthplace.

Not entirely true. A British citizen can only pass citizenship to their children if that citizen is British by birth (i.e. born in Britain or born outside Britain to British parents who were at the time serving the British state).
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
19 May 2010  #6
No, not at all. You can claim it whenever you want

I accept this.

I think I should have said something like it's automatic/problem free until the child is age five.

it,s just harder to obtain ' in Poland than here from what i gather .

Polish officials have the idea that u are one or the other, not both.

You should find the British Embassy in Warsaw very helpful.

You can always apply (in future) when you visit the UK.
espana 17 | 911
19 May 2010  #7
I Wanted to get some advice on if given the choice would the forum members prefer for there child to be born in the UK or Poland

british 100% , you dont want people laughing at your son
keen111 1 | 23
19 May 2010  #8
unlike certain countries, Britain has no time limit on the claiming of British citizenship.

You wouldn't happen to know by chance, how long a child has in order to claim an American Passport??
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
19 May 2010  #9
I think I should have said something like it's automatic/problem free until the child is age five.

Where did you get the age five thing from? There's nothing in British nationality law about the age - except the somewhat strange rules surrounding a British citizen who wasn't born in the UK passing on citizenship, in which case, you need to make sure that the child's birth is registered within 12 months. But it doesn't apply in this case.

Not entirely true. A British citizen can only pass citizenship to their children if that citizen is British by birth (i.e. born in Britain or born outside Britain to British parents who were at the time serving the British state).

They can if they meet certain criteria, usually that the parent has lived in the UK at some point - but as I understand it, every case is considered on its own merits. It's a stupid system - though I guess it stops South Africans and the like gaining easy British passports.

Polish officials have the idea that u are one or the other, not both.

Even more clearly - when in Poland, if you have Polish citizenship, then you are Polish, end of story - irrespective of what else you might be.

It must be said - Polish citizenship law is much more straightforward!
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
19 May 2010  #10
Where did you get the age five thing from?

I got it from the British Embassy in Warsaw when I asked about it for my children. This was about 15 yrs ago.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
19 May 2010  #11
I got it from the British Embassy in Warsaw

Well they obviously didn't clear it with delphiandomine.

;)
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
19 May 2010  #12
I got it from the British Embassy in Warsaw when I asked about it for my children. This was about 15 yrs ago.

Very odd, I wonder where it's coming from? I'm looking now and can't find any reference to it at all - could be a local policy in Warsaw, maybe?
z_darius 14 | 3,969
19 May 2010  #13
gov.uk/types-of-british-nationality
OP Wayman 3 | 36
19 May 2010  #14
british 100% , you dont want people laughing at your son

confirmation it,s a little Girl an why would anyone laugth if u hade a polish passport or british it,s a polish forum you numpty ' let me slap u around the head :)

the only thing that will be british will be her father i have no intention of educating or bringing her up here in the city but in the countryside in Poland :)

Trust me i belive the quality of life will be much better for her .
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
19 May 2010  #15
Trust me i belive the quality of life will be much better for her .

Do you actually know much about the Polish countryside? Unlike the UK - the Polish countryside is often plagued with huge social problems, unemployment and very antiquated attitudes towards life. It often seems quite tranquil on first glance - but when you look beyond the first image, you can see huge problems bubbling under the surface. The education is very often sub-standard in the countryside too - the schools simply don't have the money to do much at all.

As for you personally - can you really afford to live in the rural countryside here?

Wildrover on here could tell you a fair few stories about what it's actually like to live in rural Poland.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
19 May 2010  #16
there are a few good points to life in the country:

no walking to school: car or school bus

smaller schools

it's possible that a teacher lives in your village, which means the pupil can't get away with much.

tip: if u move to a village never show off your wealth.
OP Wayman 3 | 36
19 May 2010  #17
Its not that kind of countryside delphiandomine :)

Just outside Krakow on the outskirts ' Close to schools an lots of fresh air .

Im not that wealthy in fact i could be a lot more wealthy if i stay in England an continue to work here but i have been out to Poland an liked Krakow it,s a beautiful old city ' Money is not everything when i leave i give up a lot but a gain a lot in return in the long run as for flashing wealth Wroclaw that's one thing i hate about people 'it's very shallow yes i have my creature comforts but not a bling bling car it,s just not me .
plk123 8 | 4,150
20 May 2010  #18
i'd wait for the kid to arrive in UK then move to PL
inkrakow
20 May 2010  #19
i have been out to Poland an liked Krakow it,s a beautiful old city

But you've said you won't be in Krakow but in some village outside it. Those people hate the city and think it's got ideas above its station ;)

Trust me i belive the quality of life will be much better for her .

You mean schools that ram religion down kid's throats, ostracism of those kids whose parents aren't in church every Sunday, no computers in schools, precious few textbooks, an emphasis on rote learning and no credit given for independent or creative thought, no foreign language teachers who have ever left Poland, no exposure to other cultures, an inherent suspicion of strangers, no playgrounds, no facilities for kids, no aspirations for their kids except to have more children...

Hmm. The Polish countryside is the last place I'd want to bring up my kids. Even Krakow would be a struggle.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
20 May 2010  #20
precious few textbooks,

there are no text books in any school. parents buy text books.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
20 May 2010  #21
Getting back to his first point, his child can apply for a passport since the OP is British born and holds British Citizenship.

Evidence of the parent's citizenship
You should provide any birth, marriage, naturalisation or registration certificates, passports or official letter which prove the citizenship of the parent concerned.


gov.uk/types-of-british-nationality

Any man and his dogs' kid (no offence to the OP) can claim British citizenship for their child these days - you really wont have a problem.
OP Wayman 3 | 36
20 May 2010  #22
Hmm. The Polish countryside is the last place I'd want to bring up my kids. Even Krakow would be a struggle.

Have u been to London recently 'it,s overcrowded as are most schools 'the food is dire obesity is rife in children as young as 10 as all there parents have time to feed them is fast food that is mass produced from livestock that is full of god knows what ' then u have to worry if there going to get mugged or maybe stabbed on there way back from school as for stimulating a child its down to the parent ' a child can learn if u have the patients to teach them an praise them as they grow ' are child will obviosuly grow up speaking english and polish witch me an the mother will teach her as for aspirations if u give the chance an praise 'a child can suprise u 'on the other side Education costs 'u say the schools are old maybe the old way is sometimes better than the new ' Seeing english children grow up u would understand the greed an whant an the fact that u take everything for granted ' i wish to bring my baby up with strong morals unlike most children here '

The cost of the education i understand u pay ' I have a bit of luck as the family is in the book buisness so i get a good discount .
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
21 May 2010  #23
i wish to bring my baby up with strong morals unlike most children here '

Then you certainly don't want to send them to a Polish school. Polish schoolchildren learn from a very early age that cheating is acceptable and in fact encouraged through peer pressure. Even if your child excels, he/she will be expected to help others cheat - and will be ostracised if they refuse to do so. Don't forget that in village schools just outside cities, they tend to be populated by people who can't afford to drive their child to better city schools - which means that you'll have even more problems with "morals".

Remember, in Poland, the attitude is that if something is worthless to you, then you might as well cheat. Virtually no-one graduates from university here without cheating - do you think that's particularly moral or correct?

Let's not forget that Polish schools actually lack the ability to discipline children effectively - British schools are far more well equipped

Then we can talk about learning support - there is essentially next to nothing available in Polish schools. A child with any sort of special needs simply has to sit down and shut up - unlike in British schools where many schools have schemes to pick up on these problems. Let's not forget that the concept of teaching assistants is alien to Polish schools - and then we can talk further about how children are put under pressure from the first class of school to actually pass the year.

But moving onto secondary/high school education - does it really make sense for all children to be in the same class as others for the entire time at school? What's the point in high achievers being kept in the same class as people who are struggling to pass?

there are no text books in any school. parents buy text books.

And it's not uncommon for teachers to proscribe textbooks that they've written. If that's "moral", then...

A Polish school would be the last place that I'd send a child to learn any sort of strong morals.

Good Polish schools in cities are acceptable, but I'd really think twice before sending a child to a village school. It's not like the UK where village schools are often superior.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
21 May 2010  #24
'the food is dire

What? Im not fat and Im English..Nothing to do with the food in this country its greedy fatties eating high fat high sugar convenience food and doing nothing to burn it off! FFS..How stupid are you?

then u have to worry if there going to get mugged or maybe stabbed on there way back from school

Then move to a decent area, I have none of these problems..

a child can learn if u have the patients to teach them an praise them as they grow

You can do this in any country in Europe.

Seeing english children grow up u

I have plenty of little ones in my family that are just fine..Your generalisations are shocking!

early age that cheating is acceptable

A friend of mine told me how they cheated openly in exams...I told him about invidulators in exam rooms and he couldnt believe we have that in the UK and it was that strict!

i wish to bring my baby up with strong morals unlike most children here '

Morals begin at home..not in the class room..Move to a decent areas in the UK and you'll find they are in abundance!
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
21 May 2010  #25
the food is dir

Food is fine, how many michellin star places does Poland have?
If parents took responsibility then we wouldn't have an obesity problem.

then u have to worry if there going to get mugged or maybe stabbed

Grow up, if u are that insecure then do something about it.

child its down to the parent

Of course it is. You're the parent, you cant expect the schools to take over your responsibilities.

Cant be bother reading the rest, will be garbage. Sorry.

What a tw*t
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
21 May 2010  #26
Then move to a decent area, I have none of these problems..

I never saw any of these either.

A friend of mine told me how they cheated openly in exams...I told him about invidulators in exam rooms and he couldnt believe we have that in the UK and it was that strict!

They really can't believe it here, it's almost institutionalised from the first class of school that you can cheat to get ahead and that you have to help other people or that you're "cold" and "unfriendly". Personally, I think it's one of the most shameful thing about Poland - that cheating is seen as not only as acceptable, but positively encouraged.

Should we also talk about how in universities, professors will base the exams on their own, expensive books that must be purchased? Certainly a very "moral" society.

The UK isn't perfect, no-one claims it is - but when it comes to integrity of education, Poland is light years behind.
OP Wayman 3 | 36
21 May 2010  #27

Your clueless so your advice an input mean very little just as your insults as for insecurity i am not the one taking digs on the internet on someone who asked a valid question about the birth of there child 'so before u prepare for your next little line of insults ' bear this in mind not everyone on the web is a scared of confrontation or a little abuse ' after all i am English so i can be rather rude aswel but i belive that's just showing how English u are witch is another reason for not educating my child around muppets like yourself '

Quote then u have to worry if there going to get mugged or maybe stabbed
Grow up, if u are that insecure then do something about it.

Love a smart arse ' Fella i spent a great many years ducking an fighting my way in life an i have the scars an stab holes from two knife wounds ' one in the face an one in the back so maybe u can educate myself about knife crime in London as u no a lot more than i do an obviously your an expert muggings an stabbings .

As for the food enjoy what floats your boat 'seen an read more than enough to educate myself about food production an demand for a product .

Thanks again for your input delphiandomine

seems there is some valid points about what u have posted witch is why i posted to seek advice so i apreciate the positive input from the polish members as u have lived there all your life an understand first hand what its like to be educated in Poland hade no idea about the cheating knew about the issue of books '
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
21 May 2010  #28
Clueless, have u ever lived in Poland?

i belive that's just showing how English u are witch is another reason for not educating my child around muppets like yourself '

Yup, the Poles have a lot better understanding of English...written mostly.

Fella i spent a great many years ducking an fighting my way in life an i have the scars an stab holes from two knife wounds ' one in the face an one in the back so maybe u can educate myself about knife crime in London as u no a lot more than i do an obviously your an expert muggings an stabbings .

Soory, I dont know many people with lives like yours, maybe you're not in the best area, or friends with the wrong people. But seriously, out of everybody I know in london none have to "duck and dive" on their way to school or home.

seen an read more than enough to educate myself about food production an demand for a product .

And you have read enough and still want to come to gid old Polska? Do u know the **** that gets pumped into thir ham and meat?
OP Wayman 3 | 36
21 May 2010  #29
Would admin be kind enough to close my thread .

Thank u
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
21 May 2010  #30
Well, despite what I said I wish you luck in the future. Its a hard place to settle but once you crack it you will never have any regrets. :)


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