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Polish trains often get frozen and are overcrowded? :-)


discoverpolska 2 | 5
8 Jun 2011  #1
This is how Poles travel using Polish trains :)

In Poland trains often gets frozen, hence they stop on station and cannot run. Passengers are asked to move to other really crowded trains.

discoverpolska.com/?cat=5
ma101nx 4 | 20
8 Jun 2011  #3
I wish the air con in Krakow trains was so good at the moment
OP discoverpolska 2 | 5
10 Jun 2011  #4
It is almost summer so it must be hot :-)
nemo 1 | 3
10 Jun 2011  #5
I've found that trains in Poland are ALWAYS late. Never to be seen in any other European country. Why is that?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,389
10 Jun 2011  #6
I've found that trains in Poland are ALWAYS late

i've found otherwise. some trains are late.
scottie1113 7 | 898
11 Jun 2011  #7
some trains are late.

Very few, in my experience, but it happens. It's life. Live with it, especially as the tracks are being rebuilt.
boletus 30 | 1,367
11 Jun 2011  #8
I spent two months in Italy some time ago and the phrase "Il treno è in ritardo" was a ve-e-ery popular phrase then. In translation: "the train is late". You could enhance it with the adverb "molto" - "very", as in "Il treno è in molto ritardo". I heard it every day, at every railway station. Add to it the perpetual railway workers strikes and you should get the entire picture.

Never to be seen in any other European country.

Didn't you just imply that you are a seasoned traveller? Hmm, funny..
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #9
I've found that trains in Poland are ALWAYS late. Never to be seen in any other European country. Why is that?

There is one thing about Polish railways: They do not go on strike.
In 2005, we flew to Liverpool, and the hotel was in Southport because all Liverpool hotels had been already full due to horse races held in the city. My plan was to take a train from a location close to John Lennon Airport directly to Southport. Unluckily, "industrial action" was in force, meaning a lot of trouble to us getting to the hotel.

In all fairness, trains in Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands and in Scandinavia are perfect, and in Poland they are not that good...
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #10
Nemo, they are looking for consistency :) The osobowy trains can be a nightmare. You have to say your prayers before boarding :)
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #11
Seanus

You are very right about ordinary trains, they suck. Whenever I have to travel by train, I'm taking EuroCity or InterCity whenever available.
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #12
Thanks, AS. I've commented on the other thread.

OK, on topic. I was once stuck going from Gliwice to Katowice by osobowy/local train. I could have gotten there faster by jogging as we were stuck for almost an hour with no updates on the condition of the engine. This is why such Poles are criticised (most often by their own people). They just don't value customer service and allaying fears enough. Frayed nerves galore!
Harry
11 Jun 2011  #13
British trains:

dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2002093/Cable-theft-blamed-South-West-Trains-chaos-Passengers-threatened-arrest.html
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #14
OK, on topic. I was once stuck going from Gliwice to Katowice by osobowy/local train. I could have gotten there faster by jogging as we were stuck for almost an hour with no updates on the condition of the engine. This is why such Poles are criticised (most often by their own people). They just don't value customer service and allaying fears enough. Frayed nerves galore!

I have to agree with you. The lack of information is killing.

Once, I travelled by train from Szczecin to Warszawa in winter time. The engine broke just 200 m after the station of my town. I had two options: One, to get off the train, crawl through snow onto the platform then take a long walk home; or, wait until the engine is repaired or replaced and go to Warszawa to spend the night at my parents' flat there. The missing factor was the proper information, so I could make the right decision and save time.

Harry, the cable theft used to be common on the WKD commuter line here, too. WKD had to install alarm systems and strengten the cooperation between the railway security and the police. It has worked out.
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #15
Some years back, they didn't update the timetables. In Katowice, it's like a pass through area and not a station. Dingy is a good word. The trains are like a magical mystery tour. They sometimes change the line, just to keep you guessing.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #16
Right, Katowice station is hopeless.

Not so long time ago, I was about to make a decision if I should choose an EuroCity to depart very soon or wait for another InterCity to depart later. I chose the EuroCity. The EuroCity was very late and of course I experienced the adventure with changing lines. The InterCity was first in Warsaw, much earlier than the EuroCity.
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #17
On a more positive note, I like the PKP Intercity trains. They are quite expensive but I'd happily pay their going rates to use their service. I took the Warsaw-Gliwice-Berlin train in 2004 and was very impressed with the comfort on offer. None of those dire red, plastic excuses for seats that you can find on osobowy trains. Travelling in comfort over long distance is important for sure.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #18
Yes, be aware, however, the coffee served in (on?) the IC trains is undrinkable and I always settle with their good Dilmah tea.
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #19
In/on is also not easy. On a ship but in a boat. Anyway, it's 'I'm on the train' or 'on PKP trains', even though you are inside ;) ;0 I would have though on was how Africans travel, on the roof, lol.

The coffee is that bad? I seem to recall that it was quite ok and I like good coffee. Dilmah is one of the best, I love their tea :) Tea is important in soothing the stomach.
alexw68
11 Jun 2011  #20
On a ship but in a boat.

On a boat is also acceptable. In a ship, not, it's true.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #21
The coffee is that bad? I seem to recall that it was quite ok and I like good coffee.

I depends what coffee you prefer, Seanus. IC serve a small bag containing a pinch of "coffee"; once mixed with hot water forming thin coffee-tea, bitter like a... I don't drink coffee that is worse than served at restaurants, hotels, coffee bars (Coffee Haven) or good petrol stations (Statoil), and coffee I drink at home resembles molten asphalt ;)

However, taking into account the British drink "Bovril-tea" and spread Marmite on toasts, nothing can surprise me!
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #22
Ah, that brings back a memory. I got muddled up with another coffee experience. Yeah, I also got that 'bag' and it was diabolical.

Has anyone else noticed that the eating carriage tends to be filled with losers but the rest of the train seems to be ok? (on PKP trains)
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
11 Jun 2011  #23
On a boat is also acceptable. In a ship, not, it's true.

Serving ON submarines,at sea IN a submarine.......or sth like that :)

re the coffee? what is that white powder they give you instead of milk? Im sure its just some leftover from the building trade,and I dont mean the catering side of things ;)
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #24
diabolical

I like your sense of humour. Are you English or Irish or...?

as anyone else noticed that the eating carriage tends to be filled with losers but the rest of the train seems to be ok? (on PKP trains)

Well... How to say that. I happen to be one of those losers sometimes. Bored with long trip, I often go there and order "kiełbasa po zbójnicku" and, again, tea :-)
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #25
I'm 'or'..... :)

Losers stay, others buy and return to their place ;) ;)

Some interesting characters on Polish trains. Many spill out their woes and expect you to listen. I always have the excuse of being a foreigner.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #26
I'm 'or'..... :)

Welsh? Scottish?

Some interesting characters on Polish trains. Many spill out their woes and expect you to listen. I always have the excuse of being a foreigner.

Similar thing happened to me once on a Katowice train. She was a French Arab, speaking vigorously in (bad) French and telling a story on how a Polish fiance stood her up, pede! ;-) She had no argent, you know, in it. I can't speak French but her story was so universal I was able to understand everything ;)
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #27
Scottish :)

Now, Polish trains? No money? I know French quite well (it's my 3rd/4th language) but I've never seen any Arabs here, tbh. I was talking about Polish racconteurs who fill you with anecdote after anecdote. I can understand them but they tell me little. I feel better on trains as language is power. Polish is very much my second language and I know how to broach certain subjects with specific types of Poles. Elderly Poles are generally harmless and I sometimes get sth from a chat with them :)
delphiandomine 84 | 17,703
11 Jun 2011  #28
Has anyone else noticed that the eating carriage tends to be filled with losers but the rest of the train seems to be ok? (on PKP trains)

I object, I use the restaurant carriage all the time! :(

(their interpretation of an "English" breakfast isn't bad)
Seanus 15 | 19,707
11 Jun 2011  #29
In my experience, many are sloshed and holding onto their Tyskie cans for life ;) ;0

I think the hiking up of prices will have changed that. PKP tends to attract a reasonable class of clientele.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011  #30
PKP tends to attract a reasonable class of clientele.

That's right. It is now possible to book a ticket for EC and IC over the Internet, pick up the ticket on the train and pay with a card.

I'm only unhappy because of the smoking ban. This makes me choose the car while I could travel comfortably, cheaper, cut a nap, and be relaxed after the trip.


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