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After 7 Weeks, why i loved Poland =)


Levi 12 | 450
24 Aug 2011  #1
Now Back to my country, after my time spending doing volunteer work there in Poland for 7 weeks, i wanna share with you all the impressions that i had about that contry and why i liked there.

1 - You Don't use Euro, so probably you will not collapse so soon =)

2 - Very Helpful people, everytime that i needed someone to help me, even strange people helped me in a so nice way.

3 - Social Life... You have that so much, so it is very easy to make friends =)

4 - Despite the image that south-americans have of Europeans (Cold people), polish people were different, much more friendly than i could imagine!!!

5 - Pierogi is a great dish!

6 - And also good Vodkas, of course.

7 - People respect each other (the only rude people that i saw were a few old people... but young people were ever very polite) and, most of the time, they are honest.

8 - At least the city that i lived (Lodz) have a very good public transportation system.

9 - Good prices to eat in good restaurants or to enjoy the nightlife.

10 - Young people usually have good english!

So, to everyone there that keep saying "My country sucks" and all that (I Don't know why polish people complain so much about their place... Your country is nice!) remember that also your country have a lot of good things ;)
AussieSheila 5 | 75
24 Aug 2011  #2
They don't queue at train stations or when boarding ferries, they elbowed their way and fight for seats just like in some 3rd world countries.
valpomike 11 | 197
24 Aug 2011  #3
Thank you for this information. I myself, spent a month, on each of two visit, in Poland, and agree with you so much.
I stayed in Warsaw, but traveled all over, and find this true all over.

Mike
JustysiaS 13 | 2,240
24 Aug 2011  #4
They don't queue at train stations or when boarding ferries, they elbowed their way and fight for seats just like in some 3rd world countries.

that's not true we love to queue! any reason to queue and we're there forming a line ha ha. perfect example are departure gates at the airports. even if they announce very clearly that they want people with children or people who are sat in the back rows to board the plane first, everybody's lining up anyway :D. most of the time there is a queue before boarding is even announced! as for shoving and pushing, i can't recall anything like that happening to me, you must've been shoving your way through yourself for people to elbow you out of their way. there are always people out there who wanna be first but there is nothing you can do about someone like that, it's either bydło przodem - or sh*t before the shovel ;)
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
24 Aug 2011  #5
Levi, it is good to see a Brazilian on this forum. Brazil has the second largest population of Polonia in the world and they should have more of a presence on this forum. Today is the poet Paolo Leminski's birthday:

INVERNACULAR

This language isn't mine.
It's plain as day.
When meaning goes away,
the word stays behind.
Maybe I'm just lying.
Or am I lying truth?
So I say myself - just,
Maybe - I can barely say.
This isn't my tongue.
The language I speak mutes
a distant song,
the voice, beyond, not a word.
The dialect you utilize
on the left bank of the phrase,
that's what does it, lusifies
me, half, maybe, inside.

°°°

elsonfroes.com.br/kamiquase/chris.htm
delphiandomine 83 | 17,596
24 Aug 2011  #6
Brazil has the second largest population of Polonia in the world

And interestingly, most of them are Jewish, not Catholic.

Must burn, huh?
gumishu 11 | 4,991
24 Aug 2011  #7
And interestingly, most of them are Jewish, not Catholic.

I am not informed on the subject but I very much doubt Jews who came to Brasil from Poland consider themselves Polish or Polonia - in such case why would you insist on calling them so - so again there is Polonia in Brasil and it is hmm big - and no I don't think Jews are part of this
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
24 Aug 2011  #8
Delphiandomine is lying according to the Wiki article on Polonia in Brazil:

The number of people of Polish descent in Brazil is estimated at between 1 million and 5 millions. Most Polish Brazilians are Catholic

OP Levi 12 | 450
24 Aug 2011  #9
Yeah, there is a lot of polish people here in Brazil, in the state of Paraná.

One of my friends is from Polish family (His family name is Ribatski). He is catholic and he is a very nice person, despite the fact that he is a little very conservative.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
25 Aug 2011  #10
You can't just spot a Catholic like that. It's such pretentious BS to say so.

Nice OP :) :)
Wroclaw Boy
25 Aug 2011  #11
After 7 Weeks, why i loved Poland =)

everybody loves Poland after a few weeks, try 7 months then it will be the "after 7 months, why i hate Poland". Make it to three years and you'll be tearing your hair out. Nah only joking, its the same as all places, good points and bad points.
grubas 12 | 1,391
25 Aug 2011  #12
Young people usually have good english!

I doubt it.
Wroclaw Boy
25 Aug 2011  #13
Young people usually have good english!

I doubt it.

Its true, not many speak good English in Poland, young, old or what ever. The education system is shocking, its too national lacking an international (big picture) focus.
OP Levi 12 | 450
25 Aug 2011  #14
Young people usually have good english!

I Define "Good English" as the english perfectly understandable.

And in that way, a lot of young people in Poland speak good english. Every time that i needed help, i ever searched for a young person and in most of the times they understood me and i could understand them =)
Wroclaw Boy
25 Aug 2011  #15
Its just not up to par with other EU countries such as France, Belgium, Italy, Sweden, Holland or Switzerland, sure many speak it but the standard is quite low. Need to bear in mind its much easier for non slaves to pick up the English language.
grubas 12 | 1,391
25 Aug 2011  #16
Really?What are you trying to say dude?!I have met people from all of mentioned countries and they weren't even close to the level of many Poles or even mine.
Nightglade 7 | 97
25 Aug 2011  #17
Oddly enough, many of the young ones seem to know how to ask for cigarettes, money for wódka among other unpleasantries. I had an (almost) violent encounter on the bus, when a particularly smug youth got on the bus, stood in front of the glass opposite my seat and glared down at me continuously without breaking eye contact. I called up my partner to vent my frustration, but he then started leaning in and being aggressive, when I stood up he was mumbling something (which actually turned out to be English) "U mad bro?" - his words. He eventually settled when I offered him the opportunity to get off the bus with me ("No, i no fight, you ok, happy be").

I never rely on anyone here to speak English, a large proportion of them often tend not to speak even if they know. Thus far, any experience I've had of trying to ask for help from people on the streets had ended poorly. Man eat man world in Poland (don't take my sentiments to heart though, it's probably just Poznań)
mafketis 19 | 7,009
25 Aug 2011  #18
levi wrote

I Define "Good English" as the english perfectly understandable.

That sentence is not good English. Would you call 'Good Poruguese' if someone just used Portuguese words with no thought as to grammar?

note: I've made this point twice before but used portuguese words (once with translation) and the moderators decided to delete my comments because subtle points are apparently against their policy. If this comment is deleted I'm out of here.
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
25 Aug 2011  #19
4 - Despite the image that south-americans have of Europeans (Cold people), polish people were different, much more friendly than i could imagine!!!

We are working on this. We would like to be full-time Europeans or even beyond. We are buying a lot of lawn mowers now ;)
Pierdolski - | 31
25 Aug 2011  #20
They don't queue at train stations or when boarding ferries, they elbowed their way and fight for seats just like in some 3rd world countries.

True, I witnessed this myself. This comes from the communist days when if you didn't fight your way in you had to wait for the next bus, if there was a next bus. This fade out but will take time.
beckski 12 | 1,617
25 Aug 2011  #21
i loved Poland

During my visit to Poland, I fell in love with the wonderful country too.

g people usually have good english!

Thank goodness! Some college students came to my rescue when I was lost in Warsaw.
DarekHasz - | 1
22 Oct 2014  #22
Merged: My love for Poland, Polish women, culture, food and general way of life

Dzien Dobry!

I was lucky enough to meet a beautiful Polish kobieta last year and we dated for some time, visited Poland twice and fell in love with Polish culture and especially food and general way of life.

My town has a great polish community but i just cannot find me another polish lady at all, where do they hide?

As a Bodybuilder I don't go out drinking much but I have been out a few times in the past couple of months to see if any are out (which they are not).

Gdzie yest polski kobiety!?!?!

After my ex, i feel i do not want anybody but Polish lady.

Had to get it off my chest, so thanks for listening to me rant.

Pozdrowienia


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