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Credit / Debit Cards to use in Poland


PunchBuggyBlue
15 Jul 2007 #1
Hi,

I have a one of those credit cards that is linked to my checking account in the States. Will I be able to use it as a normal credit card the way I do here?

Also, will it work as a DEBIT card so I can use cash machines to get zloty from an ATM?

Thanks
Shawn_H
15 Jul 2007 #2
All you have to do is find an ATM with PLUS / CIRRUS / INTERAC on the front of the machine - It has to agree with whatever system your home bank uses. Most large city's have them throughout PL. Just watch the ATM fees - may be worthwhile to withdraw enough to avoid fees, but not so much that you make yourself a target. Like all countries, PL is not immune to pick-pockets.
OP PunchBuggyBlue
15 Jul 2007 #3
Thanks. My card has the Plus symbol on it. so I'm thinking all should be well. I guess I'll find out in a few days:-)
Shawn_H
15 Jul 2007 #4
Your welcome - Enjoy your time in PL.
Florin 2 | 40
2 Dec 2009 #5
Hello!
I have a question. Can I make a debit card account in Poland if I don`t have a Polish ID?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
3 Dec 2009 #6
Yep - most banks are happy to welcome foreigners. mBank is probably the easiest of the lot, though.
Florin 2 | 40
6 Dec 2009 #7
delphiandomine
Thanks a lot, I will try that bank.

Ok I`m back with the problem. I just were to mBank and they said that if I don`t have Polish ID they can`t make an account for me.. So, in the end, it is impossible to make an account at a Polish Bank without having a Polish ID?
convex 20 | 3,978
16 Feb 2010 #8
Are you an EU citizen?
Zman
16 Feb 2010 #9
My American friend (no polish ID or citizenship, no permanent residence either) managed to open account with Millenium bank. Try there!
beelzebub - | 444
16 Feb 2010 #10
Yep Bank Millennium will take your money as long as you have a passport.

millenet.pl

They are the only ones I found who would do it without Polish papers. They are probably making a killing off of expats.
convex 20 | 3,978
16 Feb 2010 #11
I doubt they're making a killing as they probably won't loan you any money...But they will give you an account. And they're friendly, speak English and German, and are cheap.
beelzebub - | 444
16 Feb 2010 #12
They are making a killing off of fees and the investment interest they make off of your money. Banks love every zl you give them as that's more interest they earn.
convex 20 | 3,978
16 Feb 2010 #13
The fees aren't very high, and for some reason I think that someone that is not in Poland legally is going to bring much money with them. They don't make much money off of checking accounts that end up empty. They make money off of people taking loans and making large deposits. The fees cover costs.
beelzebub - | 444
16 Feb 2010 #14
Well I guess you have it all figured out then. I guess this IS a Polish forum so what would it be if people didn't want to argue about everything. After all complaining/arguing is the national sport.
convex 20 | 3,978
16 Feb 2010 #15
Well I guess you have it all figured out then.

Yea, I have everything figured out. I know how banks work.

fter all complaining/arguing is the national sport.

Gotta be good at something...
beelzebub - | 444
16 Feb 2010 #16
When you get that accomplished report back. We are on the edge of our seats.
convex 20 | 3,978
16 Feb 2010 #17
ignorant and witty, welcome!
beelzebub - | 444
16 Feb 2010 #18
I would say you were much too hard on yourself with the first one but a little too complimentary with the second.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
17 Feb 2010 #19
It might be an idea to tell your back you are going to Poland. I tried to use my RBS card in Warsaw and it got locked on me as it registered an 'unusual transaction'.

A bit weird, when my account address is in Poland.
lowfunk99 10 | 397
17 Feb 2010 #20
Mine always worked fine. I have an account at Chase.
Florin 2 | 40
17 Feb 2010 #21
Are you an EU citizen?

Yes I am.

My American friend (no polish ID or citizenship, no permanent residence either) managed to open account with Millenium bank. Try there!

Hmm, I will have a look on this bank also.. thanks!
bankingexpert
17 Feb 2010 #22
They are the only ones I found who would do it without Polish papers. They are probably making a killing off of expats.

mBank, WBK and plenty of others will open accounts without residency papers.
Florin 2 | 40
17 Feb 2010 #23
well.. i just said that I were at mBank and the women there said that I need a Polish ID to open an account... I didn't had time to check Millenium yet
beelzebub - | 444
17 Feb 2010 #24
mBank and WBK have refused people that I know of. Thus far Bank Millenium is the only one I know that will. I personally tried several including citibank, ING and BPH back when I was first looking for an account and didn't have a karta pobytu and they all refused.

However knowing how things are done in Poland you might get a different answer if you step to the next window and ask again.

I have not done anything but pay bills and use the bankomat with Millenium but I haven't had any trouble. I don't know how they are when it comes to loans or anything more complicated.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
19 Feb 2010 #25
well.. i just said that I were at mBank and the women there said that I need a Polish ID to open an account... I didn't had time to check Millenium yet

Nonsense. It even states clearly on their website that you can open an account provided you declare your residency in Poland. This isn't thes ame as having residency papers - just you have to say "yes, I live in Poland".
skysoulmate 14 | 1,296
19 Feb 2010 #26
Since this is a credit and debit card thread - I'm actually not very versed in pros and cons of using them in Poland or Europe for that matter as I usually travel from the US to/from Asia.

However, I make the occasional Europe trip not to mention visiting my folks in Scandinavia every now and then. I've noticed that I seem to be getting the best currency rates when using credit cards - Master Card gives better rates than Visa (but they're very close) and it's usually the best rate of the entire 24 hour period.

From my experience the vast majority of pilots use credit cards and not debit cards while overseas. I avoid using debit cards as much as I can when overseas and stick to CC (local cash is best of course). Too many stories of friends who've had their debit cards hijacked in China in particular. Usually your bank will reimburse you promptly but it's a pain in the butt and true hassle if you're traveling for an extended time and all of a sudden your debit card is blocked.

The credit cards are better in my view as they aren't linked to your checking account, etc. and most often you can call them collect from anywhere in the world and they'll send you money via Western Union, etc. if your card gets stolen, lost, hijacked, etc. Debit cards might be a pain as the support system just isn't as great (I use Bank of America btw).

I simply pay my credit card (or cards if I use more than one) as soon as I come back from a trip not to incur any fees. Also, if I go on a longer trip (week+) I always take a Master card and a Visa card with me in case one system breaks down in a particular country...

That's my 0.03% interest on the subject... ;)

Nonsense. It even states clearly on their website that you can open an account provided you declare your residency in Poland. This isn't thes ame as having residency papers - just you have to say "yes, I live in Poland".

Maybe it's different in Poland but in Sweden marking "resident of Sweden" implies you're a legal alien or a citizen of Sweden and residing in Sweden.

I maintain my old checking and savings account and a while back wanted to switch from Nordea to Sveabank but was told by the "new" bank that if I close my old account I wouldn't be able to open a new one until I become a resident again... In fact, Sveabank looked me up and I was registered as "Swedish citizen living abroad".

Later my current bank confirmed the info. This was 2+ years ago so maybe it's changed some and again, maybe it's very different in Poland.
Wroclaw Boy
19 Feb 2010 #27
I just were to mBank and they said that if I don`t have Polish ID they can`t make an account for me

It all depends whos sitting the other side of the desk, i used to open accounts with foreign clients in BZWBK, all they had with them was passports and proof of address (not Polish). Sometimes the person on the other side of the desk would open an account no problems but more often than not there was a problem. They dont like stepping out of their comfort zones. Replys like no Polish address or PESEL we cant open an account.

We usually had to make a big deal and say yes weve done this before you have to open an account etc.. No problems in the end.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
19 Feb 2010 #28
Maybe it's different in Poland but in Sweden marking "resident of Sweden" implies you're a legal alien or a citizen of Sweden and residing in Sweden.

It's the same, but mBank uses residing to mean "currently living in Poland' without any reference to the legality of the person in Poland. Of course, most people use "residing" to mean "legally resident".
Jyzgo
21 Feb 2010 #30
Ok I`m back with the problem. I just were to mBank and they said that if I don`t have Polish ID they can`t make an account for me.. So, in the end, it is impossible to make an account at a Polish Bank without having a Polish ID?

Well, it is not the first time when delphiandomine gives shyte advices, putting people on the roads unnecessarily.

MBank doesnt let foreigners to open debit cards. Period.


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