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Student life (with a dog) in Lodz, Poland


Ymse 1 | 4
15 Aug 2015 #1
As soon as I'm done with my bachlor in medicine, I'm thinking about the Medical program in Lodz. But I have a few concerns.

I have a lovely silver labrador that I brought from Germany when I worked there. This happy chap is always on my side, and to be departet from him is just not an option. Is it possible to combine the student life with having a dog.

Second is living. I have tried to find a small house on the outskirts, where it would be easier to have a dog. I also heard that there is petsitters that can walk Your dog when you are at School. What qualifications do they have?

I also have a lot of stuff and Furniture. How much of this I will bring I don't know. But with a bit of luck the army will pay the moving costs. I would love to find come cool room mates that would have the same view as me on living. I love outdoors, and Im weighing Storage Space more that fancy Kitchen on newly renovated. For me I would appreciate cool creative People who Thinks a slackline indoors i superb for rainy days.

The most People I see on the students forum looks like they are more "serious" stutends and whant to settle into that style. I have traveld alot, and of course have some missions from the military, and on top of this gained some life wisedom, so I do not think I will be emerged in books from sunrise til sunset, and I learn the best together with other creative souls.

So this was a bit of a loose request but just want to get the ball running. Everything that makes me see some birghtness in the further is Nice ;)

@ Ymse

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Dougpol1 32 | 2,673
15 Aug 2015 #2
I have a lovely silver labrador that I brought from Germany when I worked there. This happy chap is always on my side, and to be departet from him is just not an option. Is it possible to combine the student life with having a dog.

You mean a yellow labrador Ymse.......
How on earth are you planning to attend classes while a big dog like that sits at home? I have a lab, and if he doesn't follow me to the office, he either sits outside, or stays at home for a max. of 4/5 hours (7 hours is the absolute limit you can leave this dog to his own devices)

Consider caging your dog (indoors of course!) Mine loved his own space.

Depends on your dog of course - mine is very quiet, but is yours well trained?

I also heard that there is petsitters that can walk Your dog when you are at School. What qualifications do they have?

Two legs? What do you mean by qualifications?

Take your dog to campus, and if he's not overweight, he and you will make lots of new friends. There are quite a few people in Poland who don't know what a labrador is, and you will be ordered to muzzle him - but ignore that - because the law states that if he is on a lead he does not belong to the class of dog that must be muzzled (public transport excepted)

Find a flat near woods/park, otherwise the dog will have a miserable time here. And get both anti-rabies and microchip if you haven't already. When the police see your dog wearing a red and green tag on his collar signifying this they leave you alone.
Roger5 1 | 1,455
15 Aug 2015 #3
Find a flat near woods/park, otherwise the dog will have a miserable time here. And get both anti-rabies and microchip if you haven't already. When the police see your dog wearing a red and green tag on his collar signifying this they leave you alone.

The collar is especially important if you live near a wood where hunters operate. They are allowed to shoot uncollared dogs 50m or less from a forest. I can't cite a law source for this but have it on pretty good authority.
OP Ymse 1 | 4
15 Aug 2015 #4
Doug: But I can not bring the dog inside any buildings on campus I Guess? But hoped to find a Nice Place where it's possible to rent a petsitter for those long days at uni. Of course I know it's gonna be a Challenge, but I can't give him away. He's been With me for so many hard times in life.

Roger: He got the chip and everything in Place. I brought him from Germany when I worked there. You can say what you want about the Germans, but "ordnung must sein" :)
Roger5 1 | 1,455
15 Aug 2015 #5
This happy chap is always on my side, and to be departet from him is just not an option.

Separation anxiety might be a problem if he's not used to being away from you. The best thing would be for him to spend his days with someone. Perhaps you could advertise for a friendly person to look after him while you are at the university. You could take him there in the morning and pick him up later. It might be tricky to find someone to do this but it's not impossible.

Someone here might be able to help:
Juna Dogs FCI kennel - £ódź, Poland - Pet Service | Facebook
Dougpol1 32 | 2,673
15 Aug 2015 #6
They are allowed to shoot uncollared dogs 50m or less from a forest. I can't cite a law source for this but have it on pretty good authority.

Mmmm - it's an archaic and barbaric law that needs repealing asap. Although I am not a rich man, I would pay somebody to do a Liam Neeson on any hunter that shot my dog. Anyway, why would people walking in a state forest, go anywhere near where they hear shooting? When I hear shooting, I march off in the opposite direction.

To the OP - yes, it's not really possible to take your lab on campus. Although he is the king of dogs, people don't really appreciate his intelligence and as in Germany, only assistance dogs can accompany you.

Find a friendly doctor to give you a certificate that you are bi-polar or something, and problem solved. Seriously though, I wouldn't leave my dog with people, such as Roger suggests. He is perfectly happy at home for up to 5-6 hours. But then he is unusually passivel and not a typical lab. It's all to do with recognising the character of the dog when he is a pup, and choosing the right dog for your lifestyle.
Roger5 1 | 1,455
15 Aug 2015 #7
Anyway, why would people walking in a state forest, go anywhere near where they hear shooting?

They shoot less than a kilometre from my village. There's a tall hide within sight of our regular walk, and I sometimes go there with the mutt when the hunters are away. Most dogs are smart enough not to go anywhere near the sound of shotguns, but you never know, and of course some people just hate dogs, especially when they like to chase deer, like mine.
Dougpol1 32 | 2,673
15 Aug 2015 #8
some people just hate dogs, especially when they like to chase deer, like mine.

Yes, I know what you mean Roger. Like people every dog has it's vice. Mine goes nuts on the beach :) Luckily he wont (hopefully) be shot dead there.

Seriously - what the hell is a hide doing within a mile of the village, About time the law realised that this is not the land of Potop anymore, and hunting needs new regulations, with strict enforcement too.

I realise that hunting is essential to the ecology in a land of forests, but you can't have it both ways. The government have encouraged building anywhere at all and how people want, and yet your dog can be shot while out on walkies?

******* scandalous.
OP Ymse 1 | 4
15 Aug 2015 #9
I have to admit that during my service in Kosovo we shot a lot of stray dogs. But they was a danger to humans. There was actually a kid killed in on of the villages we patroled.

But I Guess he would manage at home. But would need to be a bit more structured With my daily routines. But would be cool to find a roomate that also is found of dogs.

And I Guess for those long study days it's possible to hire someone to walk him.

But is it a problem to find a appartment where they Accept dogs?
weeg
15 Aug 2015 #10
The law is they can/should shoot any uncollared dog 150 meters from a house. Unfortunately, Polish people, probably city dwellers, routinely drive to the forests and abandon their unwanted dogs.
Dougpol1 32 | 2,673
16 Aug 2015 #11
Unfortunately, Polish people, probably city dwellers, routinely drive to the forests and abandon their unwanted dogs.

Yes and those are the vermin that need shooting - and of course we are not talking about the dogs. That's a horrible way to die for any animal, literally eaten alive by flies and other insects, and I would wish horrible pain visited on such "people."

But is it a problem to find a appartment where they Accept dogs?

Not really. No. Some breeds, yes. Not this breed especially, although as you know spring is a royal pain when he is losing his winter coat. But nobody likes a dog that barks, so I trained mine not to....also he was caged when a pup, to protect him from cables, causing damage etc.

Take your dog to the landlord when looking at the flat. The landlord needs to like dogs too, otherwise he'll find all sorts of excuses to keep your deposit when you leave.

for those long study days

I don't remember those. We were always in the pub for 12 o'clock :)
Roger5 1 | 1,455
16 Aug 2015 #12
Sad day for us yesterday. My sister-in-law was out cycling, searching for wild plums, when she found a dog lying by the side of the road, obviously abadoned. It was hot and the dog was suffering terribly. The dog's belly was distended and her breathing was laboured and rattly. My sil put the dog in her basket and took her home. My wife went to see the dog and was worried. So at five o'clock we phoned our vet and he agreed to meet us at his surgery. Being a holiday, he arrived in t-shirt and flip flops straight from a family gathering. He examined the dog, which he said was four months old, and said her lungs were wrecked. We took his advice and, with great sadness, he euthanised the little one.

I would wish horrible pain visited on such "people."

+1
weeg
16 Aug 2015 #13
Forest workers and people living nearby have to deal with it.How many dogs can you adopt.
Roger5 1 | 1,455
16 Aug 2015 #14
A nationwide campaign to control and neuter dogs and cats would help. Every year we see new litters of kittens and puppies in our village. Some people seem to think it acceptable to leave their animals to their own devices. We have one neutered Tomcat and a strictly controlled dog; some people don't even know how many they have. They leave food outside their door, so passing dogs and cats help themselves and therefore reproduce unchecked. Nobody seems willing to do anything about uncontrolled dogs. I have personally killed two when driving, something that pains me as an animal-lover. I'd like to see more public education on this matter.
OP Ymse 1 | 4
16 Aug 2015 #15
Appreciate all replies, but please dont deviate to much from the topic. My main concern is how it is to have a dog when studying in Poland :)
Dougpol1 32 | 2,673
16 Aug 2015 #16
Sad day for us yesterday

Good on your SIL and all of yours' Roger.

The number of answers on this board tells us that generally people couldn't give a toss.

Forest workers and people living nearby have to deal with it.

No Weeg - don't do that Polish "but what about......." nonsense. It needs dealing with. The people you mention see all - It's village life FFS.

When they take the registration of the car dumping the animals they should be awarded money out of public funds.
The people who do this are guilty of animal cruelty and should be facing a year in prison. Having their teeth smashed in when their fellow prisoners learn what they are about is the very least they deserve.

Appreciate all replies, but please dont deviate to much from the topic. My main concern is how it is to have a dog when studying in Poland :)

Now now - don't get touchy with us :) We're trying to help you - just pointing out the dangers. And I advise you to manage your own dog. I am exceedingly busy, and my 2 year old is bouncy, healthy and happy. It can be done. Roger and Weeg were just letting you know of the realities of this still backward country.

I was so angry after reading Rogers' story that I decided to walk my dog on the beach from Gdansk to Sopot to cool off. It was a hilarious experience. He was walking at heel in the surf, and I was wearing my headphones - of course as everybody knows, Poland thinks it's America and a lot of councils ban dogs from the beaches in season. I am happy to report that a few other owners of well trained dogs were flouting the law as well.

I reckon this law is unenforceable if you are walking your dog between low and high tide mark. I had a few lifeguards come up to me and order me off the beach -but they have zero authority and I just smiled at them. One jobsworth tried to grab me but a legal warning did for him.......

No straz in sight - so now we know. In an emergency, the beaches are not safe - don't anybody tell ISIS.

So we have silly lifeguards sticking their nose in and overstepping their mandate, but forest rangers wont point their guns in the right direction and do a citizens' arrest on those who abandon animals.

What a joke.
Looker - | 1,102
16 Aug 2015 #17
forest rangers wont point their guns in the right direction and do a citizens' arrest on those who abandon animals.

I'm not sure - there were cases when a dog was shot in a forest, when not leashed to the owner. I myself experienced threats from a drunk forest guard in his jeep about shooting my dog, although it was about 12 years ago. And it was a trained dog (German shepherd) - who came back to me after the first call. But they (the 'guards') are still checking the forest areas for stray dogs and may hunting them.
Roger5 1 | 1,455
17 Aug 2015 #18
My main concern is how it is to have a dog when studying in Poland :)

Have you considered Szczecin?
pum.edu.pl


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