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Life in Poland vs Norway - good for children, benefits, etc?


locobron 3 | 12
9 Nov 2010  #1
I was wondering if anyone had left Poland to go and live in Norway and how they felt about it....good for children? Benefits? etc.
SeanBM 35 | 5,809
9 Nov 2010  #2
I gotta wonder about a post that asks not about employment but about benefits in the very first sentence.
OP locobron 3 | 12
9 Nov 2010  #3
Okay, I did not mean benefits as in I want to go there and live off other peoples tax payments. I was just enquiring whether or not the return for paying high taxes each month is beneficial. I work hard, pay my taxes and do my bit for this country. It was just an enquiry.
Krynski - | 82
9 Nov 2010  #4
SeanBM, the guy has explained to you what he meant. Are you able now to answer his question about Norway? As for me, I would say to locobron: if you are Polish, don't go, for God's sake, to Norway, but stay in Poland and try to make ends meet here. I wish all Poles living abroad, especially those toiling and suffering in Britain, started coming back to Poland.
SeanBM 35 | 5,809
9 Nov 2010  #5
SeanBM, the guy has explained to you what he meant.

I am capable of reading for myself, thank you very much.
OP locobron 3 | 12
9 Nov 2010  #6
@ Krynski: We have some friends over there, one is Norwegian and the other is English and both highly recommend it there. Be it that the one might be slightly biast seeing as she is Norwegian:), but I did some research into it and th start up seems very expensive and my question was aimed at is it worth uprooting my son here to move him there? We are content here it is just that to go back to my country for holiday to see my family is almost impossible with what we earn. But I guess the true question is: "is the grass greener on the other side?"
skysoulmate 14 | 1,296
9 Nov 2010  #7
I was wodnering if anyone had left Poland to go and live in Norway and how they felt about it....good for children? Beneifts? etc.

Yeah, I'd say it's good for kids but it's such a vast subject, there's really no simple answer to your question.

I was raised in Sweden, my sister lives in Norway, honestly don't know much about the benefits in Poland but I'd say life in Scandinavia overall is pretty good. Of course, it all depends on the type of job you have, exactly where you settle down, how large your family is, etc., etc.

As far as kids, the maternity/paternity leave is 15 months in Sweden and I think it's the same in Norway. They look at your income in the last 12 months, divide it by 12 and use that as your monthly base salary while you're on leave. I think you get 90% of what you used to earn but that percentage might have changed. Forgot what my sister said but Grunwald here should know.

You also get child subsidies each month until they turn 18 and at least in Sweden you get more money the more children you have. Those subsidies are unrelated to the parents' income, all kids get them. So if you have 1 kid you get 1 child subsidy, for 2 kids you get 2 but for 3 kiddos you get 4, for 5 you get 7 and so on. Government wants people to have babies. See why Scandinavia is such a popular destination for people from the middle east? :)
POLENGGGs 2 | 150
9 Nov 2010  #8
it would have been worth the heartache anywhere from the late 1960's till the early 1990's. But in 2010, definately not - but should you go against advice heregiven, Norway is definately T H E place to Go In Scandinavia
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,543
9 Nov 2010  #9
but Grunwald here should know.

Mr Grunwald

I was wodnering if anyone had left Poland to go and live in Norway and how they felt about it....good for children? Beneifts? etc.

My father knew some Poles who LIVED here
(He is Polish and now living in Poland)
To say it so almost all of them left and returned to Poland (except one family I think)
Just to give you a headstart, all is expensive here because the salaries are top top top high, so if you want to LIVE here you need Norwegian education and all kind of things.

Also my Father couldn't stand all the nationalistic pricks in every Norwegian (His friend was in a meeting in Tomra and they were discussing if it was good to start in Poland, then one said "Hell they got so many drunks it will be bulletproof!" Many in the meeting laughed out loud while all knew that it was a Pole sitting next to all of them, at the same time My (Norwegian) uncle was sitting there and didn't respond (Thank God he didn't laugh at least)

Also somehow most Norwegians think of slavs = Slaves but they won't tell it to you unless you got their 100% trust...
Also be prepared to be called Jordbærplukker (Strawberry plucker) as many Poles in the old days went here to pluck strawberries (some still do) heck I even did...

Genera benefits are quite good I must say but, I don't like any lechers (Especially other Norwegians that is just sick)

good for children?

Well...
There are Sundays schools (Polish Catholic) in Oslo which you can send them each Saturday&Sunday

Other then that it will be what kind of place you buy
But pls don't settle in a "sossette" Bærum
I don't want more of them *****ng pri**s
OP locobron 3 | 12
9 Nov 2010  #10
Just for the record, i am South African, I live here in poland now with my family.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,543
9 Nov 2010  #11
Is your skin white or dark? Cause if it's dark then you can expect support from left extremists which got the country by the balls but if your white then your screwed, honestly!

Just simple facts
OP locobron 3 | 12
9 Nov 2010  #12
White, not that it should matter. Which country are you referring to when you talk about left extremists?
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,543
9 Nov 2010  #13
Norway?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_Left_Party_%28Norway%29

They are in coalition with Arbeiderparti

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_Labour_Party

and Centre party

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senterpartiet

You want this!? Please come! ;p
Teffle 22 | 1,321
9 Nov 2010  #14
those toiling and suffering in Britain

Jesus, the drama.
PennBoy 76 | 2,438
9 Nov 2010  #15
I thought Scandinavians were supposed to be liberal open people
Softsong 5 | 495
9 Nov 2010  #16
I heard that Norway was recently rated the happiest place to live.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
9 Nov 2010  #17
I don't believe it.

It obviously has a big, dark, dramatic, terrible secret - that Mr Grunwald hints at.

Wait and see - it will all come out in the news soon. I bet they are all satanists or something.

; )

(In fact judging by the antics of the some of the metal bands there...)
Piotr123 1 | 49
9 Nov 2010  #18
Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland are always the happiest places to live in the world if you look at statistical figures, but unfortunately the real world is quite different from the world of statistics.

Finland was recently ranked by a well known US newspaper as the happiest place to live in the world. The people responsible for the study could probably not even locate Finland on a map, instead they simply looked at various statistical figures and concluded that Finland is the winner!

Being sent to northern Sweden would be like being sent to Siberia, however all of Finland is like northern Sweden. If it was anywhere else then everyone there would be classified as mentally insane. If you are not mentally insane by the time you arrive there, you are sure to be by the time you leave.

Even by Scandinavian standards Norwegians are considered to be insane! The country is one of the very richest in the world but people live in simple wooden houses which are considered crude even according to Swedish standards.

Few people own a car but everyone own a bicycle. It is important to keep in mind that Norway is a very oil rich country. Norwegians work a few hours a day and spend the rest of the time hiking in the mountains. They usually look like this:

norwegians

that is if they are not wearing that silly sweater called lusekofte.

Swedes have among the highest salaries in the EU, yet Norwegians usually have twice the salary and still everyone go to Sweden to do their shopping! The country is so expensive that even with twice the salary people have less money than in Sweden.

Unless you are Scandinavian you will never be able to stay there for long mentally. Most Swedish people can only manage to work a few months in Norway before they must return to Sweden unless they are to risk their mental health permanently.

In the winter it is dark all the time and because of the climate you will pretty much end up like the character in The Shining. Forget about cities bustling with people and activity, the biggest city is Oslo and it is like a big village. All other cities are actual villages and it is rare to see any people at all in the winter months.
Softsong 5 | 495
9 Nov 2010  #19
Wow..well that bubble was certainly burst! LOL

I did read on another forum that a young man from the USA met a lady from Norway and he emigrated to her country and they seem happy. Hmmmm....maybe that smile is slightly demented like on the Shining....come to think of it....he has been typing a lot, too. ;-)
Piotr123 1 | 49
9 Nov 2010  #20
Poor fellow, I fear it might already be too late for him. The last stage of the transformation looks like this:
pole

Behind the calm appearance there is a demented mind. If he has sent you a picture then you should see if he wears that sweater! If he wears it along with wavering a Norwegian flag then he has already lost all grip on reality.
Softsong 5 | 495
9 Nov 2010  #21
Piotr123, you really have made me laugh! Actually, I do know another man who is a native from Norway, and the resemblance is uncanny!
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,543
9 Nov 2010  #22
if you look at statistical figures

Yeah and there was no unemployment in the eastern block, GIVE ME A BREAK!

n simple wooden houses which are considered crude even according to Swedish standards.

It's considered a luxury to have a wooden hut in the mountains in Norway
(The less gadgets in it the better closest to nature)

that silly sweater called lusekofte.

You better watch your tongue!
My "Mormor" made one for me :(

go to Sweden to do their shopping!

Ey... When most people live on Østlandet and it's twice as cheap a few miles away then WHY NOT?!

a few months in Norway before they must return to Sweden unless they are to risk their mental health permanently.

I agree on that

to see any people at all in the winter months.

No it isn't it's just very very very few

looks like this:

I wish people were wearing that often...
Most Norwegian looks like sissies (the youth)

If he wears it along with wavering a Norwegian flag then he has already lost all grip on reality.

lol lol lol lol so true

Piotr123, you really have made me laugh!

Well he isn't that far away from the road really...
OP locobron 3 | 12
10 Nov 2010  #23
now to think about it i am pretty sure i have seen a photo of my english friend living there now in one of those sweaters......no flag ...yet
Wroclaw Boy
11 Nov 2010  #24
I wish all Poles living abroad, especially those toiling and suffering in Britain, started coming back to Poland.

Why don't you practice what you preach Puzzler? All that traveling has put you completely out of touch.

if you are Polish, don't go, for God's sake, to Norway, but stay in Poland and try to make ends meet here.

yes listen to me im 100% Polish ive been traveling for years and spend about two weeks a year in Poland. What a fcuking hypocrite.
jonni 16 | 2,486
11 Nov 2010  #25
I wish all Poles living abroad, especially those toiling and suffering in Britain, started coming back to Poland.

It is a matter of individual choice - evidently there are people who prefer to be in the UK.
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
11 Nov 2010  #26
I'm Swedish (most of my life I've lived close to the Norwegian border).

I know several Polish people who moved to Sweden/Norway with their families (esp. doctors). Most of them are really satisfied with their new life. Only 1 of them is thinking about moving back to Poland.

Most Swedish people can only manage to work a few months in Norway before they must return to Sweden unless they are to risk their mental health permanently.

This is not true. I know many Swedes who stay longer and are happy with that.

Also be prepared to be called Jordbærplukker (Strawberry plucker) as many Poles in the old days went here to pluck strawberries (some still do)

This can be true sometimes. However, surveys show that Scandinavians are among the most tolerant people in the world.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,543
11 Nov 2010  #27
However, surveys show that Scandinavians are among the most tolerant people in the world.

surveys and what they really feel are two different things and you know it

This is not true. I know many Swedes who stay longer and are happy with that.

Yeah but looking at them makes us misarable ;p

(most of my life I've lived close to the Norwegian border).

!!!
Skjera!!?
skysoulmate 14 | 1,296
11 Nov 2010  #28
surveys and what they really feel are two different things and you know it

I must say I'm somewhat surprised you have such negative feelings toward Norway. I was raised in Sweden but am very familiar with Norway as my sister and her husband live there. I know there are people who have a problem with foreigners in Norge but you'll find them everywhere. Most people are angry with the employers who exploit those people than the people themselves, similar to the US where most people dislike the employers who hire Mexicans and pay them half of what an American would get. Nothing wrong with the Mexicans per se, it's the lack of enforcement and dubious employers who are the guilty culprits.

From my personal observation I must say both Swedes and Norwegians have been extremely tolerant and more so supportive of their neighbors who happen to come from different countries. The jordgubbplockar (jordbærplukker) - syndrome you just described exists in many countries. In the US people pick on Mexicans sometimes, Canadians make fun of the Chinese, etc., you know people who often have the lowest paying jobs. Part of it is the fear of "losing jobs to foreigners", part of it is xenophobia, part of it is to have someone to pick on, pretty common in most countries.

I agree with you that there's a lot of leftist mentality especially in Norway and especially in the femi-nazi circles but most of it is fairly harmless.

I think Norway is a good country to live in, not perfect but there are no perfect countries to live in.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,543
11 Nov 2010  #29
there's a lot of leftist mentality especially in Norway and especially in the femi-nazi circles

See? See?

I must say I'm somewhat surprised you have such negative feelings toward Norway.

Sorry but when at School I get mocked for beliving in a God, and being called a Strawberry plucker and trying to turn of the TV when i watched the Popes funeral I DON'T GET GOOD OPINION ABOUT NORWEGIANS

and at that I hear somebody mock the royal family at every corner.. It is very frustrating
skysoulmate 14 | 1,296
11 Nov 2010  #30
I agree with you, and understand it has to be very frustrating but it sounds like you're surrounded by a bunch of morons, trust me, there are many good Norwegians out there. Hopefully you'll run into them sooner rather than later.

Lycka till.


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