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Spelling, grammar and punctuation task in English


WielkiPolak 58 | 1,034
6 Apr 2015  #1
Hi folks. A friend of mine has this English task to do and has asked if I can help them. They have to correct any spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes. While my English is fine, I would not consider myself a grammatical expert and was wondering if there is anyone here with a little bit of time who is very good at this stuff and could run over this for me and correct it? It's not very long. Some of the mistakes are more obvious, but others I am not sure about.

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Imaginary Member A: Does the Minister agree that we should put troops on the ground in Syria and Iran to defeat ISUL? Surely it is time that we should?

Imaginary Minister: No. In the first case, we have no mandate: in the last case, the decision is for is the Iraqi Government.

Imaginary Member B: Why have Conservative Back-Benchers opposed the Private Member Bill introduced by my noble friend Lord Pervis of Tweedbank, the International Development (Official Assistance Target) Bill, which would guarantee 7% of our gross product for oversees aid?

Imaginary Minister: That is matter for them.

Imaginary Member C: Will the Goverment set up a statutory inquiry into the failures of East Yorkshire Police in the Rotheram child abuse scandal?

Imaginary Minster: Investigations are being undertaken by the National Crime Association and by Operation Stovepipe, so we see the need for a statuary enquiry at this point.

Imaginary Member C: What is Her Majesty's Government assessment of developments in Southern Sudan, with particular reference to the bombardment of civilians in South Kordoban and Blue Nile states?

Imaginary Minister: We support the meditation work of President Tabho Mbeki's EU panel and to emphasise to all sides that the only resolution to conflict is through political dialogue.

Imaginary Member D: Can the Minister tell us what are the weighting times are for DLA.

Imaginary Minister: As your Lordship's House knows the two processes, for PIP and for DLA are seperate and different contractors operates them. Maximum has come into run the WAC process.

Seems nobody is willing to help, so I have done my best to help her with it. I would like to ask for help with one part.

Imaginary Minister: No. In the first case, we have no mandate: in the last case, the decision is for is the Iraqi Government.

Is there something wrong with the above sentence? I believe some of the punctuation might be off, but would would it be done correctly?
Vincent 9 | 809 Moderator
6 Apr 2015  #2
Imaginary Minister: No. In the first case, we have no mandate: in the last case, the decision is for is the Iraqi Government.

No need for the extra "is" before "the" in the last part of the sentence.
OP WielkiPolak 58 | 1,034
6 Apr 2015  #3
Oh yeah. I can't believe I didn't see that.

Is that the only error? No punctuation ones?
pam
6 Apr 2015  #4
Maybe someone who actually teaches English language can do better, but mistakes I can see are :

Imaginary Minister: That is matter for them.

That is a matter for them.

Imaginary Minster: Investigations are being undertaken by ...

Replace statuary with statutory.

Imaginary Minister: We support the meditation work of ...

Meditation work? Possibly mediation instead?
If it is, I would write:-
... and we need to emphasise to all ...

Imaginary Member D: Can the Minister tell us ...

Can the Minister tell us what the waiting times are for DLA?

Imaginary Minister: As your Lordship's House ...

The sentence is wrong but I'm not sure what you're trying to say to correct it.
Roger5 1 | 1,458
7 Apr 2015  #5
How will he make any progress if other people do his work for him?
OP WielkiPolak 58 | 1,034
7 Apr 2015  #6
It's a she, but yeah, you're right. I was doing a favour for a friend but they can do the next one on their own.

Appreciate the help pam. I did most of it myself but thanks anyway.
falkin 1 | 16
8 Sep 2019  #7
Merged:

I need an explanation for a few English expressions



Hello

Could somebody please help me to understand these English expressions:

1. . I had just reached the up with which I could not put........ ( the women that said this was very angry with one man)
2. And he has spat my name at me ever since..
3.cut a wide berthe

What does this expression mean?
It's an easier way to roll through the world than the alternative

Thank you in advance
Vincent 9 | 809 Moderator
8 Sep 2019  #8
3.cut a wide berthe

To give a "wide berth" usually means to keep a distance from somebody or something.
pawian 159 | 9,509
8 Sep 2019  #9
2. And he has spat my name at me ever since..

I guess that whenever Weinstein saw her, he uttered/murmured her name in a very angry disdainful way to show his disapproval of her earlier rejection of his immoral advances at her.

I had just reached the up with which I could not put......

Isn`t it a funny play with the word order? I have reached the limits of my endurance, couldn`t bear it any longer... etc.
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
9 Sep 2019  #10
I once knew someone who had a BIRTH on a train!
How's that for a real groaner of a bad pun?
pawian 159 | 9,509
9 Sep 2019  #11
I once knew someone who had a BIRTH on a train!

Had a birth.... Do you mean mother or baby?
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
9 Sep 2019  #12
Well obviously the mom had the little one and not the other way round:-)


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