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Some Kurdish and Polish Similarities


Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #1
Polish : Kurdish : Meaning

ale : lê : but
bez : bejh : without
brat : bra, brat (archaic) : brother
być : bin : to be
co : ko, ce : what
coś : cit : something, thing
dlugi : drejh : long
do : ta : to
kolo : xul : circle
my : eme : we
na : ne (dialectal) : to
nazwa : nav : name
nie : niye- : grammatical negative " not"
nowy : nowa : new
oni : ewan : they
ow : ew : that
znać : zanin : to know

Lyzko
15 May 2010 #2
Wow! What a stretch of the imagination:-) Be mindful in linguistics of "false-friend" sound-alikes which belie related origins, yet in fact are derived from a totally unrelated word stock and mean the same thing as each other purely by coincidence:

Albanian 'ju' - English 'you' (IDENTICAL pronunciation, virtually the identical meaning!!!)
Hungarian 'haz' - English 'house' (same meaning exactly..)

etc...

For that matter, using this logic, how about Russian and Hebrew???

Russian 'oni' (pronounced ah-NEE) -English 'they' vs.
Hebrew 'ani'( same pronunciation as the Russian!) -English 'I'

Relationship sleuthing is fun though, isn't it (lest we get suckered in by temptation)!
Piorun - | 658
15 May 2010 #3
Why limit the similarities to language? How about national anthem;

Polish starts with; ‘Poland has not yet perished as long as we shall live’
Kurdish ; ‘The Kurdish nation is alive, its language is yet spoken’

How about history? Partitions? Living dispersed throughout many nations, hell how about folklore? legends? I believe on one of your festivals ‘the procession of Newroz’ where you light up bonfires kind of similar to Polish ‘Sobótki’ where we also used to light up bonfires, probably not even remotely related but similar none the less. Now that would be interesting read, since not much is available on those topics.
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #4
'Lightning'. the interconnectedness of peoples (narody/plemie) is indeed fascinating. Back to Linguist's point, these seeming cognates, actually aren't cognates at all::-))
Piorun - | 658
15 May 2010 #5
these seeming cognates, actually aren't cognates at all::-))

I wouldn’t be so sure, I’m not a linguist but Kurdish belongs to Indo-Iranian so who knows.
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #6
'I'm not a linguist..'

Well I am, and am thus skeptical about such matters, if at the same time open to new, if tested, evidence:-)
Piorun - | 658
15 May 2010 #7
‘koło’ is not that farfetched, old settlements were always in shape of a circle easily defended on the step, even American settlers used this form of defence against Indians, but it goes way back when and could be of same origin. Besides he’s talking of similarities not actual borrowing or common origin anyhow.
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #8
Oops. Dont take it that way "moj brat". I think there is to be an itsy-bitsy misunderstanding. Not my intention to give any pushing in terms of admitting some groundless root-finding ideas. I just simply brought a few instances out of which for sure there might be both non-related and cognate words. Since I did not stress "etymological similarities" but merely "similarities". And indisputably you aint gonna put the outward similarities under the question mark in at all.

As I affirmed above these are only similarities. In case you were interested, as I could reckon that you are, to get aware of some "etymological" likenesses between those Kurdish and Polish words I would be giving you these ones, of which I am utterly assured:

brat : bra, brat (archaic) : brother
być : bin : to be
co : ko, ce : what
dlugi : drejh : long
my : eme : we
nie : niye- : grammatical negative " not"
nowy : nowa : new
znać : zanin : to know

You can try them. All of these 8 definitions in both Kurdish and Polish share the same Indo European root indeed.
king polkakamon - | 544
15 May 2010 #9
Polish and greek similarities:
1.Kurva-kurwa means in greek the hole in the ground and the low ethics woman
2.Dobros-dobry means in greek good(for people).Einai dobros means he is good
3.Doma-doma means the room in greek
4.Glava-glowa glava means head in greek
5.Vava-babcia vava means grandmother,old woman in greek
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #10
Lyzko, I am all an amateur linguist but I am surprised at you since it bewilders me to let it to my mind how come you, as a Linguist, do not know about some basic Polish words such as "znac", "co", or "my" sharing unique similarities with their Iranian counterparts?! Otherwise how come you come to think of and instantly express this: "Back to Linguist's point, these seeming cognates, actually aren't cognates at all::-))".

@ Piorun

Thanks for your call for consideration of mutual similarities in a wider range. Although I am only in good in linguistics (my diversion) as well as design (my education), but it is surprisingly gladdening to hear of such a ceremony within Poland similar to that of our Newroz. Also as you properly mentioned Kurdish, like Polish, is an Indo-European language and that means there might be etymological likenesses between these two languages. I gotta add that, as you again perceived correctly, I did not mean any etymological (or God forbid "borrowing") similarities by means of my first wordlist. It is from one of my posts in a Kurdish forum, posted some 2 years ago, and when I registered with your forum I just thought that list could be something useful in order to commence my contribution over here.
Lyzko
15 May 2010 #11
Linguist, hold your horses there! I most certainly do concur regarding the long-proven affinity between ALL Indo-European tongues. It's merely that I reserve judgement as to the alleged "cognateness" of the numerous sound-alike/look-alike words previously cited.

Of course, I too have examined the PIE-charts connecting the root of every known as well as extant language to one another, Avestan with Sanskrit with Lithuanian, Latin etc..

But again, I draw your attention to those words (and not isolated examples either) 'ju'/you, 'haz'/house etc. which have been proven by professional linguists, among them Merrit Ruhlen and others, NOT to be etymologically linked to each other, yet sharing like semantic functions:-)
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #12
I got no horses to hold, I am on my own. I am really glad that you eventually got the point and recollected the "long-proven affinity between all Indo-European languages". By the way you are welcomed to judge the 8 words that I claimed to be etymologically cognates. Well I think in this case to say "refer to your linguistic sources" is more proper than using the verb "judge".

Yes a little comparison between Avestan / Saka and Old Church Slavic languages would be telling on many facts of course.

Yup bro, I am all aware of your point. Another exampel I could make would be Persian "bad" and English "bad" both come up in the most accurate semantic equality as well as an amazing outward resemblance, but surely not of the same origin.

As I have already mentioned, my initial list is merely to show some apparently similar Kurdish and Polish words. And I did not talk about their total etymological kinship anyways. I have prepared an Etymologically Similar Wordlist of Kurdish and Polish words, which I am abt to post in a new thread Deo volente.
king polkakamon - | 544
15 May 2010 #13
As far as I am concerned we simply borrowed slavic words from Slavs living here so these words are no wonder.They regard mainly nature themes like names of trees(platan etc) and names of shephard life.
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #14
@ King_Polkakamon

Well I think there you got a misconception. The term "Slavic", in its linguistic concept to my knowledge, is different from what you would ever refer to any ethnic group so-called Slavs or whatever. That is to say from a Linguistic viewpoint Polish language itself is obviously classified as a "West Slavic Language". You can google it.

There may be borrowings from related languages in any directions of course. But to consider Polish and Iranian similarities as other-Slavic borrowing wholly, is a big blunder. Since Polish is a Slavic language in fact.
king polkakamon - | 544
15 May 2010 #15
Countries which neighboured to Slavs got some slavic words.That's all.
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #16
Kurdish and Polish: An Etymological Similitude

The compared words below are Kurdish and Polish cognates, namely from the same Indo-European origin, however their modern meanings may have been occasionally diverged:

Kurdish : Polish : Proto Indo-European root

biv : pszczoła : bʰey* (bee)
birdin : brac : bʰer-* (to bear)
bon : budzic : bʰewd* (to wake up)
bín : byc : bʰuh* (to become)
brow : brew : bʰruh* (brow)
bra / brat (archaic) : brat : bʰreh-ter* (brother)
tawín : tayac : teh, w-* (to melt)
tem : ciemny : temo* (dark)
téw : cieply : tep* (warm)
tedre : cietrzew : teter* (grouse)
tiré (archaic) : trzy : treyes* (three)
dish : dziewierz : dehiwer* (husband's brother)
dan : dac : deh* (to give)
diréjh : długi : dluh, g* (long)
dijh : deszcz : dus* (fall)
du : dwa : dwoh* (two)
díní : dzien : dei-no* (day)
déw : dziw : déyw-o* (shining; Deity)
dar : drzewo : doru* (tree)
dayan : doic : dʰeh* (to suckle)
dirrig : drzazga : dʰergʰen* (thorn)
du : dym : dʰuh-mo* (smoke)
der : drzwi : dʰwer
zemí : ziemia : dʰegʰom* (earth)
zirk : serce : ker* (heart)
sirwe : słowo : klew* (to hear)
set : sto : kmtom* (hundred)
sipe : suka : kwo* (dog)
zayín : ziec : genH* (to give birth)
zanín : znac : gneH* (to know)
zerd : zołty : gʰel* (to shine)
zewer : zły : gʰew* (to bend)
zimig : zima : gʰei-mn* (winter)
call : cały : kaiko* (whole)
kof / koz : kaszlec : kwas* (cough)
cwar : cztery : ketworos* (four)
jhín : życ : gʷeiHw* (to live)
girr : gora : gʷer* (mountain)
jhin : żona : gʷen* (woman)
jhendin : gnac : gʷʰen* (to strike)
sipil : śledziona : splengʰ* (spleen)
wé stan : stac : steh* (stand)
húyín : świnia : suh* (swine)
shesh : sześc : swéks* (six)
ad : jeśc : h-ed* (to eat)
hes : jest : h-es* (to be)
rishtin : rzygac : h-reug* (to vomit)
stirí : ostry : h-ek* (sharp)
joq : igo : yugom* (yoke)
wetar : widziec : weyd* (to see, to know)
wiz : wiaz : wingʰ* (elm)
lésín : lizac : leig* (to lick)
lawan : lubic : lewb* (to love)
min : mnie : me* (me)
mey : miod : medhu* (mead)
megen (<meden) : miedzy : medyo* (between)
meng : miesiac : meh-nos* (moon)
mirdin : martwy : mer* (to die)
miro : mrowka : morwi* (ant)
meshk : mozg : mosgo* (brain)
muz : mucha : mu* (housefly)
mishk : mysz : muH-s* (mouse)
mak : matka : méh-ter* (mother)
man : maż : manu* (person)
núwa : niebo : nebhos* (cloud)
nutek : noc : nokʷts* (night)
nowa : nowy : néwos* (new)


Countries which neighboured to Slavs got some slavic words.That's all.

Ok nothing is wrong with it. But you mentioned "we [Polish people] borrowed from Slavs", and it doesnt make sense becuz Polish people are themselves Slavs. I dont know whether you find it offensive to be called Slav or something like that but plz dont take it I just mean it from a linguistic aspect.
king polkakamon - | 544
15 May 2010 #17
I bet kurdish has quite a few similarities with turkish language.
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #18
Indeed. But it is not referred to as "similarity" it is "borrowing". And for your knowledge many dialectal Kurdish varieties are contaminated by Turkic (Turkish, Azerbaijani, Turcoman) languages.

Some people may think that what is the similarity between Kurdish "zewer" and Polish "zly". For them it should be stated that sound changes are important. If you heed the Proto Indo European (PIE) and Kurdish / Polish words you will get that PIE "g" changes to "z" in both Kurdish(Iranian) and Polish(Slavic). Also PIE "k" is retained as "s/z" in Kurdish and "s" in Polish. Such likenesses make these (Iranian / Slavic) languages look similar, in a unique and peerless way of course.
king polkakamon - | 544
15 May 2010 #19
And we have so many horrible sounding turkish words,how to get rid of them is a big issue.
STFU - | 39
15 May 2010 #20
You can find coincendental similarities among all the languages of the world. In the past, people travelled the whole globe, traded, and exchanged information. So I'd call it hardly surprising that you can find a few similarities.

:)

But I won't stop you from having fun with language!
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #21
And we have so many horrible sounding turkish words,how to get rid of them is a big issue.

I am sure you cannot feel me completely but Turkish loanwords used to be my nightmare! I Yes they are, I dont know the proper term, as you said "horrible-sounding". But I cannot believe that you got Turkish words in Polish too?! How come since Poland was never ever under the sway of Ottomans. Would you please example some of those Turkish loanwords?
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
15 May 2010 #22
Hungarian 'haz' - English 'house' (same meaning exactly..)

I noticed this when I visited terror haza in Budapest...Languages have cross overs. Furious is a Nordic word..but we use it daily in the English language ;0)

Telephone
ambulance
Police

All the above are used in all countries but with varied spellings.
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #23
Thanks for your comment STFU. But all due respect I am afraid none of the words mentioned under the post "An Etymological Similitude" are coincidentally similar.

However for example Kurdish "nav" and Polish "nazwa" are most likely similar in an accidental manner.

Thanks by the way, language is all I got :wink:

I noticed this when I visited terror haza in Budapest...Languages have cross overs. Furious is a Nordic word..but we use it daily in the English language ;0)

Yes. Also "sky" or "Tuesday" are non-English loans of Scandinavian origin. But these instances dont halt us from the fact that English "house", German "Haus", and Dutch "huis" are etymologically similar and no one has borrowed it from the others. :)
Harrys gerbel
15 May 2010 #24
thanks again ! i appreciate guys who came for harrys candle light vigil only 3 but all good a achievemnt! RIP HARRY!
OP Linguist 1 | 37
15 May 2010 #25
First I noticed exclusive similarities between Kurdish and Russian. From then on I recognized that almost all Slavic languages, including Polish, share some unique likenesses with Kurdish (and Iranian languages) too.

To me it is interesting to see how come after at least three milleniums still languages such as Kurdish and Polish got something in common. Regarding to the fact that the speakers of these two language never ever been in a close contact during the last three milleniums! I also got a very beloved friend who's from Poland and her presence in our local forum motivated me to have a virtual journey over a Polish forum in return. :)
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
16 May 2010 #26
But we do borrow, thats where the spelling differences come in, we just accommodate wouldnt you agree? Does it really matter? Many words in the "English" lanaguge are from other nations...We are an Island that was inhabited by many different Europeans..Romans, French, German and Scandinavian (all made an impact on our language, but took away our native tongue) and we colonised and "borrowed words..We also have words such as veranda which is an India word..The Oxford English Language dictionary is a mix of words from around the globe.

What a breath of fresh air to have an inertesting thread :D
STFU - | 39
16 May 2010 #27
But these instances dont halt us from the fact that English "house", German "Haus", and Dutch "huis" are etymologically similar and no one has borrowed it from the others.

That's because one and the same tribe settled down in these regions in the past, and ofcourse their language evolved over time. I guess that's what I mean with real similarities and coincedental similarities.

Thanks for your comment STFU. But all due respect I am afraid none of the words mentioned under the post "An Etymological Similitude" are coincidentally similar.

Well, I think a lot of your examples seemed to be coincedental similarities. Some aren't though!

Thanks by the way, language is all I got :wink:

I can do magic (wordplay.) with words if I really want to. I love language. (I used to write funny punchlines and poetry a lot, but somehow I've lost my inspiration.)

But I cannot believe that you got Turkish words in Polish too?! How come since Poland was never ever under the sway of Ottomans.

Look at the world map. Slavic territory. Turkish territory. Slavic languages share a lot of similarities, and some Slavic tribes encountered the Ottomans. (There are probably better examples, but I can't help but to think of Vlad the impaler!)

What a breath of fresh air to have an inertesting thread :D

:)
asik 2 | 220
16 May 2010 #28
I really cannot see your suggested connection between the most of the words!!!!
Polish language belongs to the Western Slavic group and shows similarities with the Eastern Slavic group but Kurdysh language doesn't belong to either of the group and I can't understand why you insist there is a connection, especially with Polish language.

Kurdish : Polish : Proto Indo-European root

biv : pszczoła : bʰey* (bee) completelty different

birdin : brac : bʰer-* (to bear) - also completely different and for correction, Polish brać means to take

bon : budzic : bʰewd* (to wake up) or here with budzić where is the connection???

bín : byc : bʰuh* (to become) - być means to be and where's the connection here???

brow : brew : bʰruh* (brow) I can see same word but in English and what's similar with Polish???

bra / brat (archaic) : brat : bʰreh-ter* (brother) One connection with your archaic word

tawín : tayac : teh, w-* (to melt) should be tajać or topnieć in Polish , no connection!

tem : ciemny : temo* (dark) - no connection!

téw : cieply : tep* (warm) Nothing here!

tedre : cietrzew : teter* (grouse) - abolutely nothing here!

tiré (archaic) : trzy : treyes* (three) - no connection even with your archaic word

dish : dziewierz : dehiwer* (husband's brother) -in Polish husban's brother is szwagier
never heard of dziewierz and again no connection here


dan : dac : deh* (to give) no connection! word dać and dan or deh - completely different !

diréjh : długi : dluh, g* (long) no connection!

dijh : deszcz : dus* (fall) deszcz means rain - no connection!

du : dwa : dwoh* (two) - du and dwa ?? can't see connection

ndíní : dzien : dei-no* (day) - nothing here!

déw : dziw : déyw-o* (shining; Deity) , word dziw means wonder, miracle, strange thing- shining means błyszczy in Polish and deity means bóstwo in Polish

dar : drzewo : doru* (tree) - no connection!

dayan : doic : dʰeh* (to suckle) - doić means to milk (a cow) - no connection!

dirrig : drzazga : dʰergʰen* (thorn) - thorn in Polish means kolec also I can't see the connection!

du : dym : dʰuh-mo* (smoke) - no connection!

der : drzwi : dʰwer - no connection!

zemí : ziemia : dʰegʰom* (earth) - not really a connection!

zirk : serce : ker* (heart) what's the connection here??

sirwe : słowo : klew* (to hear) - słowo means word and to hear is słyszeć

set : sto : kmtom* (hundred) - no connection!

sipe : suka : kwo* (dog) suka means bitch or female dogdog is pies in Polish - no connection!

zayín : ziec : genH* (to give birth)- what thaa!! zięć means son-in-law, and urodzić/rodzić means to give birth - absolutely no connection!

zanín : znac : gneH* (to know) - nothing here!

zerd : zołty : gʰel* (to shine) - żółty means yellow (colour) - no connection!

zewer : zły : gʰew* (to bend)- Polish zły means angry - nothing here!!

zimig : zima : gʰei-mn* (winter) - no connection!

call : cały : kaiko* (whole) - no connection!, but yours call is connected here with English

kof / koz : kaszlec : kwas* (cough) - kaszel (not kaszlec) means cough and your kof sounds similar to English cough - no connection with Polish

cwar : cztery : ketworos* (four) - no connection

jhín : życ : gʷeiHw* (to live) no connection

girr : gora : gʷer* (mountain) - girr and góra??? what's the connection? both have letter "g" and "r"??

jhin : żona : gʷen* (woman) żona means wife - can't see the connection

jhendin : gnac : gʷʰen* (to strike)- gnać means to chase - no connection

sipil : śledziona : splengʰ* (spleen) - no connection

wé stan : stac : steh* (stand)
húyín : świnia : suh* (swine)
shesh : sześc : swéks* (six)
ad : jeśc : h-ed* (to eat) - should be jeść and what's the connection with [b]ad??[/b]

hes : jest : h-es* (to be) - not really, Polish jest means - (he/it) is - no connection!

rishtin : rzygac : h-reug* (to vomit)
stirí : ostry : h-ek* (sharp)
joq : igo : yugom* (yoke)- igo no such word in Polish; yoke is żółtko in Polish
wetar : widziec : weyd* (to see, to know) - NOT Correct widzieć is to see and wiedzieć is to know

wiz : wiaz : wingʰ* (elm) - nothing here! wiąz doesn't look or sound like wiz

lésín : lizac : leig* (to lick) Nothing here
lawan : lubic : lewb* (to love) TO LOVE is KOCHAĆ in Polish

min : mnie : me* (me) your [b]min in Polish is short for minutes, can't see connection with mnie[/b]

mey : miod : medhu* (mead) Polish miód means honey - no connection

megen (<meden) : miedzy : medyo* (between)
meng : miesiac : meh-nos* (moon) miesiąc means month and moon is księżyc in Polish

mirdin : martwy : mer* (to die) not correct as well - martwy means dead and to die is umierać - can't see connection!

miro : mrowka : morwi* (ant) - nothing!

meshk : mozg : mosgo* (brain) - nothing!
muz : mucha : mu* (housefly) - muz and mucha?? what's the connection???

mishk : mysz : muH-s* (mouse) - your mishk looks and sounds like Russian name Mishka not like Polish mysz
mak : matka : méh-ter* (mother)- mak in Polish means poppy (seeds) can't see connection with such important our word as[b]matka[/b]

man : maż : manu* (person) - mąż means husband!! and person means osoba in Polish

núwa : niebo : nebhos* (cloud) cloud is chmura in Polish and niebo means sky or heaven

nutek : noc : nokʷts* (night) - can't see anything here?

nowa : nowy : néwos* (new)

- little connection here!

All of these 8 definitions in both Kurdish and Polish share the same Indo European root indeed.

Indo-European language family consists of 452 different languages!

Yes, Polish people are connected with Kurdysh (can you believe you are right???) but we all are connected with the rest of the earth's population, simply because we are humans and as humans we all are able to speak !

Here are the details about the Indo-European language:
danshort.com/ie/iefamilyfull.htm

"Indo-European Language Family

This page provides the full family tree of the Indo-European languages in outline form. This outline is derived from the Indo-European language family tree in the Ethnologue, with a few revisions. There are 452 languages, extant and extinct, of the Indo-European language family listed on this page....."

OP Linguist 1 | 37
16 May 2010 #29
@ Amathyst
I see. Yes you are right. Although I think Scandinavian or German influences are easier to bear with since these languages are in a pretty closer connection with English already. But French and totally Romance (Latin, Spanish, French, etc) borrowings take English a little bit far from its original spot. If I am not mistaken the first fella who attempted to purify English suggested the below sentence instead of the very well-known "to be or not to be, this is the question":

To be or not to be, this is the ask-thing

Anyways English is already an all cool language. :)

That's because one and the same tribe settled down in these regions in the past, and ofcourse their language evolved over time. I guess that's what I mean with real similarities and coincedental similarities.

I know. Well yes for sure Germanic languages share more similarities with each other than what would they do with Romance or Slavic or Iranian languages. The same thing happens for Slavic languages too. But as a linguistically confirmed fact, Iranian and Slavic languages share some unique similarities which bring them into a particular connection, not attested amongst other groups. For example P.I.E "k" changes into "s" in both Iranian and Slavic languages and in Germanic it becomes "h", whilst Romance languages keep it unchanged and Armenian retains it as "sh". You can see the above fact if you take a brief look at the word "dog" in the mentioned languages:

P.I.E : kwon*

Iranian and Slavic "k > s"
Iranian: spe (Kurdish) < spaka < svaka* < sva(n)ak* < kwon
Slavic: suka (Polish) < swaka* < svaka* < sva(n)ak* < kwon

Germanic "k > h"
Germanic: Hund (German) < khund* < khwan* < kwon

Romance "k > c"
Romance: canis (Latin) < kwan-is* < kwon*

Armenian "k > sh"
Armenian: shun < chun* < kun* < kwon*

May be Polish "suka" and Kurdish "spe" / "spek" would not appear very similar in an ordinary guys eyes but for someone with an eye for Linguistics they are pretty similar.

Well, I think a lot of your examples seemed to be coincedental similarities. Some aren't though!

I am sorry that I have to express so, but in this case what you or me think do not matter ever. The above given examples (An Etymological Similitude) are resulted from the immense labor of linguists throughout history and are scientifically proved. They all do share the same root and are by no means to be speculated of any coincidental likeness at all. Brother, I am not making up my lists you can personally go after the Polish words and hunt up their Proto Indo European roots one by one.

I can do magic (wordplay.) with words if I really want to. I love language. (I used to write funny punchlines and poetry a lot, but somehow I've lost my inspiration.)

I see. Yea I do love to immerse myself into a sea of words too. However the inspiration of mine comes to me sporadically and I do compose some really amateur poems in Kurdish and Persian once in a blue moon.

Look at the world map. Slavic territory. Turkish territory. Slavic languages share a lot of similarities, and some Slavic tribes encountered the Ottomans. (There are probably better examples, but I can't help but to think of Vlad the impaler!)

Yes I am aware the confrontation of Slavic and Turkic tribes in the history. But if you told me Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, or even Ukrainian and Russian got Turkish loans, I wouldn’t get astonished becuz these nations have been in close contact with Turks as well as they have gone thru a period of Turkish rule somehow. But to my little knowledge Polish people never ever been under any Turkish rule and it was really amazing to hear of Turkish loans in Polish. Maybe they are military terms or I don’t know maybe you have got them via other Slavic languages. Anyways I have the vaguest idea about it.

@ Asik

Well revered "Asik", thanks for your remarks. But I aint gonna respond your comments on "An Etymological Similitude" one by one, since they are merely your personal views and utterly against the scientifically proven linguistic facts, and therefore they are of no authenticity and importance.

Here my point is to stress on the "unique" and "scientific" similarities between Kurdish (as an Iranian) and Polish (as a Slavic language).

One little example I would prefer to make, you wrote:
"wiz : wiaz : wingʰ* (elm) - nothing here! wiąz doesn't look or sound like wiz"

Regardless of the fact that even a 10 year old kid could recognize the apparent similarity between "wiz" and "wiąz"; the worthy of mention linguistic point is that both Kurdish (Iranian) and Polish (Slavic) languages develop original "g" into "z". Whilst no other linguistic group, outside of either Iranian or Slavic, represents such a shift at all.

You also stated: "but we all are connected with the rest of the earth's population, simply because we are humans and as humans we all are able to speak !"

I didn’t deny our global connection neither I claimed we are not humans nor I talked a single word about our ability to speak! I just simply tried to say we, somehow, speak alike. I don’t know what ever for but some people over here seem really spoiling for causeless infuriation and starting off prejudice, unfortunately.

I am not here to claim any thing but simply linguistic facts. And my mentioned similarities are not and could not be demeaning you or your national entity or any thing like that once in a thousand years! Nonetheless people around our round world often welcome such topics specially when they, the topics, are impartially accurate and sincere.
skysoulmate 14 | 1,296
16 May 2010 #30
... Furious is a Nordic word..but we use it daily in the English language ;0)

Furious is a Nordic word? Really? I'd say 'ursinnig' or 'rasande' in Swedish, 'rasende' in Danish and 'rasende over' in Norwegian. Not sure if there's a Nordic connection here?

2

Here's a Dutch/English "false friend" I found on Wikipedia. LOL

False friends in a Dutch advertisement actually meaning "Mommy, that one, that one, that one ..." "Please."


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