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Poles DO return to the UK


Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
1 Oct 2010  #1
telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/poland/8037991/Polish-migrants-returning-to-Britain.html

"I'm very surprised by the figures because they show quite a big increase," said Prof Krystyna Iglicka, a migration expert at Warsaw's Institute for International Affairs and one of the authors of the new research. "But the migrants see that Britain has survived the recession and that there are jobs there."
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
1 Oct 2010  #2
Where do the Home Office get their figures?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Oct 2010  #3
They clearly couldn't get enough of the culture there :) It's up to 5PLN instead of 4PLN now so there's your reason.
pawian 159 | 9,428
1 Oct 2010  #4
It is incredible how a slight change of currency exchange causes commotion in statistics research...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Oct 2010  #5
For sure, pawian :) 5000PLN a month as opposed to 4000PLN makes the difference when debts need to be paid off.
pawian 159 | 9,428
1 Oct 2010  #6
Debts are not a problem.

The reason of Polish temporary work immigration in Britain that I personally know of are:
1. A specific desire to buy an apartment in Krakow.
2. A specific desire to buy/build/open a pub in the mountainous area of southern Poland.
3. A general desire to give up attempts of making ends meet in Poland.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
1 Oct 2010  #7
I agree with your 3 points but debts can be a problem. Not such a big one, I concede, as you don't pay for your studies like the English do.

Face it, you love the food there ;)
pawian 159 | 9,428
2 Oct 2010  #8
Face it, you love the food there ;)

Once, during a British week in Liedl, I bought a few things, among them:
1. Mint sauce (that disgusting green colour).
2. Vinegar crisps.

After a few weeks, I flung the sauce into the bin. Not only colour was disgusting but the taste too.
As for crisps, when I realised I wasn`t able to eat them myself, I fed them to my students so that they had a chance to taste British food and culture. They got really angry that I tried to poison them. :):):):)

But other things are OK. My dream is to taste haggis after reading so much about it in my English textbooks.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
2 Oct 2010  #9
Haggis is an acquired taste but I like it. I think Poles would like British food, esp mince :)
poland_
2 Oct 2010  #10
3. A general desire to give up attempts of making ends meet in Poland.

Many migrants have little choice but to return to the UK.

While the Polish economy has coped well with the global economic turmoil, unemployment still stands at 11 per cent, and this figure can reach 20 per cent in Poland's extensive rural backwaters. "I know some people who have come back to Poland and they were very disappointed," said Miss Wisniewska. "The number of jobs available and quality of life is not as good as the UK. They are not very happy."

I recently spoke to British friends in London and the response was split between those that believe things are a touch better and the others that are battening down the hatches. Everyone I was speaking to, expects the UK to be in for a rough ride over the next 2-3 years.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
2 Oct 2010  #11
Yes, they do
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
2 Oct 2010  #12
Well the cuts have not really even begun to be seriously implemented, 2011 will be quite a crucial year. So if you work in the public service, don't necessarily have much business aptitude and are not particularity interested or capable of doing anything other then an office job, you will feel the pinch.

But fingers crossed, if the the British economy grows slightly above expectations, which is not very probable, things might be a little easier.

Now that the German market is going to open to the Poles next year, it will be fascinating to see how many take the plunge in search for the Euro. My guess is about a 100 thousand, most of them seasonal, I think the lure of the Euro will be irresistible to many, things will change when Poland acquires the Euro itself, which might be somewhere between 2013-2015 .
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
2 Oct 2010  #13
Poland acquires the Euro itself, which might be somewhere between 2013-2015

Bad move losing monetary control of your economy. Poland should keep the zloty.
jonni 16 | 2,485
2 Oct 2010  #14
Bad move losing monetary control of your economy.

Exactly. Britain didn't thanks to Gordon Brown, a lacklustre Premier but one of the world's greatest economists, Ireland did accept the Euro, and can't now get out of a severe crisis and are now a minnow within the Eurozone, whose fiscal policy is dictated by the interests of Germany, France and Italy.

Poland should keep the zloty.

They can't. When the Poles voted yes to joining the EU, accepting the Euro was a non-negotiable part of the package.
poland_
2 Oct 2010  #15
Just as an example, one person has a high end flooring company servicing north London with his base in NW3 and N10, business is booming, another has 15 years in the NHS, and is now a head of department/lecturer and is waiting for the outcome of the cuts.
jonni 16 | 2,485
2 Oct 2010  #16
So if you work in the public service, don't necessarily have much business aptitude and are not particularity interested or capable of doing anything other then an office job, you will feel the pinch.

Do you really think that people who work in the public sector should have "business aptitude". Should a typical public-sector worker, for example someone who cares for the profoundly disabled, or examines people for driving licences or issues planning permission for new houses have "business aptitude"?

Of course not - otherwise they'd be business people instead and Britain would be like India, with an excess of small shopkeepers and a shortage of Nurses.

The UK already has a surfeit of corporate office-monkeys, slaving away to make investors rich and too cowardly to join a union or strike for better pay. There are also too many privately-owned factories running on minimum-wage agency labour that nobody except foreigners wants to do, and only then if they can't get anything better.
poland_
2 Oct 2010  #17
Do you really think that people who work in the public sector should have "business aptitude". Should a typical public-sector worker, for example someone who cares for the profoundly disabled, or examines people for driving licences or issues planning permission for new houses have "business aptitude"?

Very good point Jonni.

These workers have bought into job security/pension option over short term wealth and are now being sold short by the government.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
3 Oct 2010  #18
world's greatest economists

One of the most ridiculous statements I have ever heard-The man who abolished boob and bust, he was fourth rate cretin.

Fair enough, I was't saying that they should have, I know many do not. I know that most probably don't as well, some of these things are concerned with risk though and how prepared you are to give it a go. BTW "a typical public-sector worker, for example someone who cares for the profoundly disabled"- will not lose their job, its the guy who tells the guy and writes instruction manuals for the person doing the caring that will though.
jonni 16 | 2,485
3 Oct 2010  #19
boob..bust..fourth rate cretin

Who millions voted for!
Your peculiar tone combined with your user name and previous odd statements highlight your bias and prejudice. At least we've only got four more years of the ConDems, assuming they last a full term.

Fair enough, I was't saying that they should have

It certainly came accross that way.

its the guy who tells the guy and writes instruction manuals for the person doing the caring that will though.

And there aren't many of those. Hardly any, in the cash-strapped public sector. In any case, the previous Tory administration increased the ratio of manager to front line staff, and nothing about the ConDems suggests they'll be able to do otherwise.

Out of interest, if your ConDems do indeed fire the person who

writes instruction manuals

, who will do it? Or should Nurses etc just make it all up as they go along?
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
3 Oct 2010  #20
jonni

Your peculiar tone combined with your user name and previous odd statements highlight your bias and prejudice. At least we've only got four more years of the ConDeems, assuming they last a full term.

Play the ball and not the Man! So I will repeat he said he had abolished boom and bust, sold Britain's gold at its lowest price, and he helped destroy Britain's pensions system, and he was grossly fiscally irresponsible. Apparently one of his best mates and the new liebour leader said just as much in his speech-so stop flying the red banner and open your mind and get on with the program.

I REPEAT THE MAN WAS A FOURTH RATE CRETIN! And even those in his own party think that is the case.

Even Blair says the conservatives are right to cut the deficit!

I would go further and say that Brown was not only one of Britain's most incompetent chancellors but also one of Europe's most incompetent.

And there aren't many of those. Hardly any, in the cash-strapped public sector. In any case, the previous Tory administration increased the ratio of manager to front line staff, and nothing about the ConDems suggests they'll be able to do otherwise.

Alas I am afraid there are, there is more bureaucrats in the NHS than there is doctors and nurses. All those NHS managers will not be there for long and Andrew Lansley will see to that.

It will take the Conservatives awhile to change this:

[youtube=

And there aren't many of those. Hardly any, in the cash-strapped public sector. In any case, the previous Tory administration increased the ratio of manager to front line staff, and nothing about the ConDems suggests they'll be able to do otherwise.

Alas I am afraid there, there is more bureaucrats in the NHS than there is doctors and nurses. All those NHS managers will not be there for long annd Andrew Lansley will see to that. It will take the Conservatives awhile to change this:

youtu.be/4LuMWgV0_J8

around
trener zolwia 1 | 940
3 Oct 2010  #21
Gordon Brown, .... one of the world's greatest economists

LMAO!

One of the most ridiculous statements I have ever heard

Get used to it from her. :s

Brown was not only one of Britain's most incompetent chancellors but also one of Europe's most incompetent.

Yes he was.
How could anyone ever vote Labour again after all they have done to the UK?
jonni 16 | 2,485
3 Oct 2010  #22
Get used to it from her. :s

The troll returns!
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
3 Oct 2010  #23
Yes he was.
How could anyone ever vote Labour again after all they have done to the UK?

It is incredible, but they have a strong self interested block that does just that, they get a solid vote form the welfare and public sectors.

You see there was a time when Labour party politicians actually were from and represented the working class, which has been changed to Labour politicians that came straight out of uni and into parliament -with 0 experience of real life, as typified by the Milibands.

At least most of the Conservatives have some real life experience, they actually created wealth not consumed it before coming into parliament.

I like charming leftists like the Milibands, provided that they keep their nose out of things they don't understand. Such as making a living.

When Leftists like Brown, stick their nose into things they don't understand, to borrow a few sentences, they become 'piddlers upon merit, beggars at the door of accomplishment, thieves of livelihood, envy-coddling tax lice applauding themselves for giving other People's money. They are the lap dogs of the poly sci class, returning to the vomit of collectivism. They are pig herders tending to the sow-who-eats her young, the welfare state. They are muck-dwelling bottom-feeders growing fat on the worries and disappointments of the electorate. They are the ditch carp of democracy.

I think these few choice sentences sum up Labour really well, the irony is that they also cuddled up to the very rich high end of town money speculators, and denuded the Bank of England from its Watch Dog status.

To borrow Mandelson’s phrase, one of the architects of New Labour: “Labour is very comfortable with people becoming filthy rich."

Out of interest, if your ConDems do indeed fire the person who writes instruction manuals
, who will do it? Or should Nurses etc just make it all up as they go along?

People will just have to use common sense, painful I know.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
3 Oct 2010  #24
They can't. When the Poles voted yes to joining the EU, accepting the Euro was a non-negotiable part of the package.

Get out of the EU than. But could Poland govern itself without supervision by the EU?
trener zolwia 1 | 940
3 Oct 2010  #25
I knew they were similar but you make UK Labour sound exactly like our US Liberal Democrats.
The Democrat Party now is a shell of its former self. In recent years it has been hijacked by Far Leftists who are in power now and wielding it like drunken Commies. They have long wanted to change the US and model it on the failed UK liberal Labour model. They will be thrown out of power here soon. It seems America needs a reminder from time to time of just how much we hate Liberalism and all its harmful tentacles.

Heck, even the 'conservatives' over there are pretty darn Liberal...
richasis 1 | 419
3 Oct 2010  #26
Bad move losing monetary control of your economy.

Nations did that long ago when they ceded it to their Central Banks.
The banker's profits, not the nation's people, are first and foremost.

sold Britain's gold at its lowest price

Gee, someone got a great deal.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
3 Oct 2010  #27
Gee, someone got a great deal.

Indeed, he hates being reminded of it though.

when he first started in parliament he wrote a little red book, which called for greater nationalisation. The guy is just off the scale when it comes to incompetence. He also wrote a book on courage can you believe it, but was to cowardly to call an election when the Conservatives started moving up in the polls when he fist assumed power. It was kind of funny because he first tried to deny it and lied, claiming no preparations had taken place, which was really dumb as his people briefed the press about it beforehand and they lost about a million or so from all the cancellations.

you tend not to see types with the sub intelligence of Brown get so far up very often.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
3 Oct 2010  #28
Many Poles are smart people, they can see what's going on. Even the less educated ones can figure out how to wangle a system or put themselves in place. What happened under Brown was that he was being led down a certain path which his experience highly suggested he shouldn't have gone down. His knowledge of economic principles should have meant that he steered clear but he was a globalist, duty bound to actively facilitate the moving around of people in Europe. It makes them easier to eventually come under umbrella control. He was an ardent proponent of a World Bank, a proper one with teeth.

The whole set-up is designed to be friendly to immigrants. As I said, 5000PLN instead of 4000PLN makes a difference.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
3 Oct 2010  #29
His knowledge of economic principles

what are you on about, he has none
Seanus 15 | 19,706
3 Oct 2010  #30
He was the Chancellor of the Exchequer and regularly involved in economic fora, hc. He didn't make the best decisions, true, but he still grasped core ideas. Kenneth Clarke he wasn't.


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