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How do Poles feel about the outcome of Germany's elections?


Irm2
26 Sep 2013 #31
From memory the first known name was Gyddanzyc,

The first fortified settlement was a direct result of the Miesko Prince of Polan directions and policy. No matter how many funny letters from the Latin Language scribes used to mirror sounds of the Slavic speech, the city has been started by Polish prince and has been in Polish hands till 1307. So, my sentence has been correct.

Unless you are in the mood for a petty squabble over sounds or accents.

Walesa most certainly is not a Danziger (although he probably considers himself to be Gdanszczanin)

Walesa is most certainly not a Danziger nor Gdanszczan and he has nothing to do with Prussian occupied lands or Prussian lands, he is a village boy from the Polish village.

Plenty of idiots in Poland and Soviet Poles as well, one to talking anti-Polish rubbish doesn't have to have any other than Polish tribal, religious or ethnic affiliations - a name of an arriviste educated by soviets will Suffice.

You still won't be able to ignore the many centuries of Teutonic/Prussian/German history in Gdansk/Danzig and Poland.

ignore no but put it into perspective on the other and other you seems to be ignoring the fact that Gdansk differs from Szczecin or Olsztyn in their history and should not be put in the same bag. Like that Nazi slut Erika Steinbach like to do, I tell ya she is one cheeky *****.
Harry
26 Sep 2013 #32
The first fortified settlement was a direct result of the Miesko Prince of Polan directions and policy. No matter how many funny letters from the Latin Language scribes used to mirror sounds of the Slavic speech, the city has been started by Polish princ

Your knowledge of the area is a little rusty: the place that is now Gdansk has been inhabited since the iron age.

Walesa is most certainly not a Danziger nor Gdanszczan and he has nothing to do with Prussian occupied lands or Prussian lands

He is most certainly not a Danziger; calling him that is meant to imply that he's German and thus to insult him.

he is a village boy from the Polish village.
Plenty of idiots in Poland and Soviet Poles as well, ... an arriviste educated by soviets will Suffice.

He's a Polish hero and has done thousands of times more for Poland than you ever will.
jon357 63 | 14,284
26 Sep 2013 #33
Nazi slut

I'm not sure the good senator is either of those things or even particularly interested in the legacy of the Hanseatic League who shaped the character of Gdańsk/Danzig more than any other single group.
Irm2
26 Sep 2013 #34
Your knowledge of the area is a little rusty:

Don't be a pathetic petty fool.

the place that is now Gdansk has been inhabited since the iron age.

You are somewhat foggy on this issue. The first fortified settlement built by the Polish prince started the city long history. If in the vicinity of that settlement were some fishing village with even longer history matters not. After passage of time it is only natural that growing settlement absorbed other neighboring hamlets. However the seed was painted by the Polish Prince.

He is most certainly not a Danziger; calling him that is meant to imply that he's German and thus to insult him.

I don't know about insulting but I agree with you that is not a Danziger and it meant to imply he is German. (As much as I hate it F! spit spit !)

He's a Polish hero and has done thousands of times more for Poland than you ever will.

Did you mean to say to Poland by any chance? If not I strongly disagree.

I'm not sure the good senator is either of those things

OK?

even particularly interested in the legacy of the Hanseatic League

Well she is not, she interested in her Prussian and Nazi legacy.

the Hanseatic League who shaped the character of Gdańsk

That League wasn't hanging in the void. As long as existence and economical well being of the Commonwealth has been assured cities if the League flourished. After Protestant Revolution and a slow decay of the Commonwealth the League sunk into nothingness pretty quick. It wasn't never nothing more than European common market area of sorts.
Harry
26 Sep 2013 #35
You are somewhat foggy on this issue. The first fortified settlement built by the Polish prince started the city long history. If in the vicinity of that settlement were some fishing village with even longer history matters not. After passage of time it is only natural that growing settlement absorbed other neighboring hamlets. However the seed was painted by the Polish Prince.

Nope, Miesko's settlement was built right on top of a settlement that dates back to the Iron Age. Although that place was almost certainly not called Danzig.
monia 3 | 212
26 Sep 2013 #36
Merkel is the most popular foreign politician in Poland. 75% of Poles trust her. It doesn't hurt her image that she's of Polish descent and has distant relatives in Poland.

She is not distant at all , she is a granddaughter of Polish national . His name was Ludwik Kaźmierczak .
jon357 63 | 14,284
26 Sep 2013 #37
Her grandpa's an irrelevance. People do like her here because she's stable, resolute and not too socially conservative.
Irm2
26 Sep 2013 #38
Nope, Miesko's settlement was built right on top of a settlement that dates back to the Iron Age. Although that place was almost certainly not called Danzig.

Nor it had been a continuous settlement if I remember correct. Iron age settlements or camping sites are of little relevance here.

People do like her here because

she got a good press in Poland provided that 80% of media in Poland is in hands of German capital.
jon357 63 | 14,284
26 Sep 2013 #39
Not that people rely on those sources and in any case, the German media support different politicians.
monia 3 | 212
26 Sep 2013 #40
Her grandpa's an irrelevance.

Your stance is irrelevant in this matter !

The family tree of German Chancellor Angela Merkel has caused excitement in Poland. Her grandfather Ludwig Kazmierczak was Polish, and fought against the Germans in World War I.

dw.de/the-german-chancellors-polish-roots/a-16698783
jon357 63 | 14,284
26 Sep 2013 #41
And means nothing whatsoever. Quit moaning, Monia. She's an intelligent enough politician not to be swayed by sentiment and in her loyalty is 100% a German, regardless of some person in her family tree who she probably barely new at best.
monia 3 | 212
26 Sep 2013 #42
PM Donald Tusk tweeted -"A. Merkel asked how you correctly pronounce Kazmierczak," he tweeted at the most recent EU summit in Brussels. "She got it on the second try :)"

Haha ,you are known for Polonophobia here on this forum , so stop this anty-Polish phobia . You are the last one in this pathetic one man show .
jon357 63 | 14,284
26 Sep 2013 #43
Don't be so silly, Monia.

Some of us by the way don't even need to think how to pronounce such an easy name. The fact she couldn't, underlines that she's German.
monia 3 | 212
26 Sep 2013 #44
You are such a narrow-minded .

No one claims she is Polish , but she has got Polish roots . That`s it , nothing else .
She has revealed close ties with Poland many times before . She spent her private time in Poland . You know people get very emotional about their roots , but this is something very unfamiliar and strange to you I suppose . She is not very open about it , because she knows that Germans are nationalisic . Once during a meeting with voters in former land belonging to DDR she announced that she had just came back from a trip to Poland and the crowd began to buzz. So she learned from this one ocassion that she should rather not to show off with her Polish ties or roots .

Don't be so silly, Monia.

How did I upset you with these news tonight . What kind of invective will you use against me next time?
jon357 63 | 14,284
26 Sep 2013 #45
And as I said, it's an irrelevance. Chancellor Merkel is as German as can be - get over that. She isn't the best chancellor they've had - nor is she the worst.

Btw, Monia, I can see invective coming in one direction only. A fine advert.
TheOther 6 | 4,086
26 Sep 2013 #46
because she knows that Germans are nationalisic

I guess you've never lived in Germany. Otherwise you would know that Germans are one of the least nationalistic and patriotic people on the planet.
Wroclaw Boy
26 Sep 2013 #47
Not the ones ive known and met, quite the opposite in fact.
Barney 14 | 1,469
26 Sep 2013 #48
Otherwise you would know that Germans are one of the least nationalistic and patriotic people on the planet.

Seriously? That is quite a national stereotype you are painting there
TheOther 6 | 4,086
27 Sep 2013 #49
Seriously?

If we talk about ordinary people and not politicians, then yes. Anything that looks even remotely patriotic (like flying the German flag) is usually frowned upon and you will automatically be labeled a right-winger or neo-Nazi ... just try it. The Germans even invented a word for this: the Nazi-Keule (the Nazi club). Any discussion will be shot down and you will be accused of being a Nazi if you have the wrong ideas (in the eyes of the PC brigade over there). Most recent example is probably Thilo Sarrazin.

FWIW: spiegel.de/international/germany-s-patriotism-problem-just-don-t-fly-the-flag-a-411948.html
Barney 14 | 1,469
27 Sep 2013 #50
And you think that no other European country looks down on flag waving morons?
jon357 63 | 14,284
27 Sep 2013 #51
Some people like flags. I don't own one myself, however we use them often enough in Poland.
TheOther 6 | 4,086
27 Sep 2013 #52
And you think that no other European country looks down on flag waving morons?

That's not what I said. I only stated that Germans are one of the least patriotic people.
Barney 14 | 1,469
27 Sep 2013 #53
Flags are grand in their place but the conversation was about flag waving nationalists who I suggest are frowned upon just as much in Poland as they are in Germany or other European countries.

The Other, I don't think Germans are more or less patriotic than others
McDouche 6 | 286
27 Sep 2013 #54
The great German people find themselves in a tough situation. Germany is constantly stereotyped as a nation of anti-Semites when in fact anti-Semitism is much more significant in countries such as Poland, Spain, Hungary, and Russia.

They often are labeled as racists if they even dare to criticize Islam even though they're really just criticizing the crazy obsession Muslim immigrants have with their religion. What's funny is that any rise in anti-Semitism in Germany is due to Muslim and East European immigration.
TheOther 6 | 4,086
27 Sep 2013 #55
flag waving nationalists who I suggest are frowned upon just as much in Poland as they are in Germany

I certainly hope so.

EDIT (just saw that you changed your post):
I was responding to Monia who claimed that Germans are nationalistic. That's simply not true in my experience.

Palivec - | 380
27 Sep 2013 #56
You still won't be able to ignore the many centuries of Teutonic/Prussian/German history in Gdansk/Danzig and Poland.

Of course you can! The Commies did it. Erase all names and structures (like cemeteries) you don't like, add Polish eagles and names (of Poles who stayed for ONE night in the city for example) everywhere... et voilà. 600 years of German presence in cities like Gdańsk or Wrocław become a mere footnote of history. The only problem with this approach was that history museums had nothing to show anymore, that's why most of them closed.
TheOther 6 | 4,086
27 Sep 2013 #57
The Commies did it.

The Polish commies tried to erase and falsify history, but they failed miserably because they couldn't control what was printed in history books outside the country. Some folks still try to manipulate historical facts, but they are thankfully in the minority and easy to spot.
Irm2
27 Sep 2013 #58
The Polish commies tried to erase and falsify history,

What you are talking about is not excluded to Polish, commies or anything else. History always has been distorted in many ways and still is. Can be use as tool to rpopgade soem ideas or just as a official historical policy of a country. History and perception of certain historical facts and events change in time and it is constant process, there are not set in stone certainties.

Erasing and falsify is only somebody opinion - to be treated seriously you need to put bring up objective veritable facts.
Germany in the past were erasing and falsify history and plenty of those pieces of prejudiced and fabricated propaganda stacked to German common cultural awareness. Germany are still in the process of distortion historical facts.

The same goes for other countries as well like the USA and Britain for example not to name Russia as an extreme fringe.
I think Poland historiography at the moment is most objective and impartial l from all these in existence. I think that it goes too far and goes into unhealthy in looking for fault on the Polish side in history.
TheOther 6 | 4,086
27 Sep 2013 #59
What you are talking about is not excluded to Polish

Of course not, but we were talking about Poland, weren't we?

I think Poland historiography at the moment is most objective and impartial

Recovered territories anyone? Ignoring or downplaying centuries of Prussian/German influence in the region? Reducing German history in Poland to the brief period of WW2? You call that objective and impartial?
Palivec - | 380
27 Sep 2013 #60
Germany are still in the process of distortion historical facts.

Really? Which facts?


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