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Poland's Lost Generation


gumishu 11 | 5,073
27 Apr 2011 #151
There is no reason why wage increases should outstrip inflation - the rationale for wage increases should be increased productivity

I don't question any rationales behind pay increases - I just point things out that contradict your soaring optimism - then again if pay increases are not higher than the inflation people are not getting richer but quite the contrary - if average pay rise equals inflation there's really no point of being overly optimistic

btw cms do you have to read something in Gazeta Wyborcza to believe or even make you wonder - if so there is a suitable link for you.

Lots of food prices actually fell last year

name these - do you mean like olives? - I mean those like potatoes. there is also alarm raised of growing consumer debt (with growing percentage of 'bad credit') - not much optimistic either
convex 20 | 3,978
27 Apr 2011 #152
There is no reason why wage increases should outstrip inflation - the rationale for wage increases should be increased productivity.

Right, and one would think with all the FDI, EU money, and new business models being pumped into Poland, that productivity would be increasing... For stagnant (stable) developed economies, I'd tend to agree with you.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,795
27 Apr 2011 #153
Right, and one would think with all the FDI, EU money, and new business models being pumped into Poland, that productivity would be increasing

Problem is, many of the lower end workers are still stuck in the Communist mentality - I've heard from more than a few people that these workers simply cannot understand that higher productivity = higher salary.
OP poland_
27 Apr 2011 #154
A "LOST GENERATION" of children vulnerable to crime and exploitation is growing up in Eastern Europe as their parents migrate abroad for work and leave them behind, migration watchdogs warn.

helsinkitimes.fi/htimes/international-news/7141-bringing-up-a-lost-generation-.html
southern 75 | 7,096
27 Apr 2011 #155
Basically if you meet the lost generation of Polki who their husbands have left alone in Poland hm,yes,they seem to suffer sometimes I would say...
AdamKadmon 2 | 508
27 Apr 2011 #156
simply cannot understand that higher productivity = higher salary

Udarnik

Are you that super-productive?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Udarnik
alexw68
27 Apr 2011 #157
It's not about being a Stakhanovite. It is, though, about not spending the entire day on Gadu-Gadu or tlen. At least with PF one drops in 2 or 3 times a day.

I'm surprised that even small businesses don't have the simple IT skills to blacklist certain sites and prevent software installs on to the desktop. That alone would improve productivity out of sheer boredom.
OP poland_
13 May 2011 #158
Great Britain is easing recruitment requirements for nurses from new EU member states, which may leave Poland facing yet another brain drain, this time in the health sector.

While Polish hospitals are already lacking at least 50,000 nurses, several thousand more of them could up and leave for Britain.

Around 12,000 Polish nurses have migrated for economic reasons since Poland’s entry into the European Union in 2004, according to estimates by a nurse’s trade union.

A decreasing number of young Poles are opting for the profession, says Elżbieta Buczkowska, head of the Main Chamber of Nurses and Midwives, who argues that low pay is one factor turning people away from nursing.

“Unfortunately, we didn’t manage to convince the health minister that so long as the minimum wage is not set at the level of the national average in an employment contract, youth will not choose a job that offers 1,400 – 1,600 zloty [an equivalent of around 360 – 400 euro] basic pay,” stressed Buczkowska.

In March, several nurses carried out a hunger strike at the Lower House of Parliament, while around half a thousand nurses protested in front of the Parliament building in Warsaw.

The protesters demanded the resumption of employment contracts as the sole binding form of taking on the professional group in hospitals, which, they claim, has been detrimental to both nurses and patients.

While up to 220,000 nurses are registered in Poland, 200,000 of them being professionally active, as many as 15,000 Polish nurses work abroad
wildrover 98 | 4,451
13 May 2011 #159
While Polish hospitals are already lacking at least 50,000 nurses, several thousand more of them could up and leave for Britain.

It won,t be a problem when most of the Poles are in the UK....

A bit worrying for those of us Remaining in Polska....so . if you are not feeling well , better head to the UK to get sick....
OP poland_
13 May 2011 #160
It won,t be a problem when most of the Poles are in the UK....

There will be an influx of asian doctors/nurses to take the place of the migrating Poles. In 5-10 years time they will wonder why there is so many dark skinned immigrants here. Priceless.
gumishu 11 | 5,073
13 May 2011 #161
In 5-10 years time they will wonder why there is so many dark skinned immigrants here.

well - I can hardly see all of those Indians and Chinese learning Polish (Poland will not switch to English in 10 years - (nor it will in 20)
OP poland_
13 May 2011 #162
well - I can hardly see all of those Indians and Chinese learning Polish

Thats most likely what the British, Irish thought when they opened their borders to workers from Central/Eastern Europe.
gumishu 11 | 5,073
13 May 2011 #163
gumishu:
well - I can hardly see all of those Indians and Chinese learning Polish

Thats most likely what the British, Irish thought when they opened their borders to workers from Central/Eastern Europe.

everybody in the world (sorry for oversimplification) is learning English not Polish - these dark-skinned doctors that you probably know or have seen in Poland all educated here and this is how they obtained their Polish -

you need to know the language well to be a doctor in a given country, wouldn't you agree

it is a different story with say construction teams where it is often enough that one or two guys actually speak any decent English
OP poland_
13 May 2011 #164
everybody in the world (sorry for oversimplification) is learning English not Polish - these dark-skinned doctors that you probably know or have seen in Poland all educated here and this is how they obtained their Polish -

I met a Jordanian Doctor, educated in Poland, who had worked in a Polish hospital in Gdansk for 10 years, now he is back in Jordan working as a tour operator. It is all about the money.

If Poland has a shortage of Doctors and nurses, someone has to fill the void.

you need to know the language well to be a doctor in a given country, wouldn't you agree

If you are a trained specialist, English will do.
gumishu 11 | 5,073
13 May 2011 #165
If Poland has a shortage of Doctors and nurses, someone has to fill the void.

vets? honestly, one needs to learn Polish to be a doctor in Poland - and as your example shows it is possible only in case you are studying in Poland - you lost some of your touch here I think warszawski
OP poland_
13 May 2011 #166
and as your example shows it is possible only in case you are studying in Poland

Doctors are academics, to acquire another language is not a big deal.
gumishu 11 | 5,073
13 May 2011 #167
yeah, sure, most English-expats will tell you that learning Polish is a piece of cake
TucsonBogdan
1 Aug 2017 #168
My name is Wayne Bogdan. I am the son of Polish immigrants ( Bogdan from Vilna and Kaminski from Duty ) to US in 1905. I was thinking of visiting Poland and maybe start a couple of new companies there. Sounds like everyone is leaving though.
Bobko 9 | 150
1 Aug 2017 #169
I was thinking of visiting Poland and maybe start a couple of new companies there.

Curious phrasing.

Sounds like everyone is leaving though.

Where do these sounds come from?
jon357 63 | 14,255
1 Aug 2017 #170
the son of Polish immigrants

If his parents were old enough to leave Poland 112 years ago, he must be pretty old himself.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,674
1 Aug 2017 #171
he must be pretty old himself.

That's interesting. If they came from Poland as newly-born babies and their son was born of 40-year old parents, that would give us 1945 as the year of his birth. Today he should be 72, so at quite an advanced age for "starting a couple of new companies" in a foreign country. But it is not impossible altogether, particularly if he has some money to loose.
jon357 63 | 14,255
1 Aug 2017 #172
But it is not impossible altogether

Certainly biologically possible, if nothing else.


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