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Does Poland live up to its freedom rights?


pgtx 30 | 3,158
14 Aug 2010 #1
THE FREEDOMS, RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS OF PERSONS AND CITIZENS OF POLAND
en.wikisource.org/wiki/Constitution_of_the_Republic_of_Poland/Chapter_2

dignity, freedom, respect, rights, equality, and so on...

are those constituted?
discuss...
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
14 Aug 2010 #2
regardless what some Polish people represent on this forum my answer is YES.

The reason I say it is: I visited Poland a month ago and I am speaking from experience.
OP pgtx 30 | 3,158
14 Aug 2010 #3
regardless what some Polish people represent on this forum

please, elaborate with no names of course...
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
14 Aug 2010 #4
you went to Poland to visit last year, so I thing that you know what I am talking about:). Am I correct?
OP pgtx 30 | 3,158
14 Aug 2010 #5
smart ass... :)
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
14 Aug 2010 #6
no, just realistic. Check your PM.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Aug 2010 #7
This is hard to judge unless you work in the business of rights conferral. I know a couple of cops here and they are better placed to comment. I don't think Poland can fully aspire to the ambitious constitution it had long ago, largely due to demographic concerns. However, the current one seems to have served its purpose well and, for a nation of potential protesters and gripers, we don't see too many strikes and protests. There was the Nigerian episode and the cross thing but the State is doing quite well otherwise.
THE HITMAN - | 236
14 Aug 2010 #8
Does Poland live up to its freedom rights?

No, categorically no..

still too many afraid to speak out of line..

still corruption exists..

what other populus puts up with some of the sh1t going on in current affairs..

elected by the people, just do their own thing ( with decisions ) regardless what those who put them into power think. ie. The cross issue in Warsaw.

Many have seen a 100% improvement since the fall of communism, but dont realize it can still be 100% better.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Aug 2010 #9
That's a part of conditioning, HITMAN. It doesn't mean that the rights have been diluted, it just means that the conditions for their exercise are not as they could be. It's like suddenly conferring rights on Iranian women and immediately expecting them to exercise them against years of conditioning. It's not 'what they know' and adaptation takes time.

Poles are afraid to speak out of line? Really? Rydzyk isn't and many Poles I know aren't. If they are words just floating in the breeze, they will. If they are in a position where tact and policy lines are required, they won't. Set and setting!

Corruption is part of life in almost every country. Please name me an exception and I'll refute it.

What sh*t in current affairs? Aren't there mechanisms for redress? Look around you, democracy has been whittled down. Obama, in all his arrogance, speaks of democracy over the mosque. This is a man who is rubbing it into those that lost loved ones.

Better? It is getting better all the time :)
video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3218585954111617501#docid=542075 3830426590918. Aaron Russo. This guy lived and worked in America, the country associated the most with freedoms and the self-made man. Look how he speaks of freedom and then contrast how things changed when he made America: From Freedom to Fascism. 70 mins of time VERY well spent. He exposed the 9/11 fraud which paved the way for the diminuition of freedom.
THE HITMAN - | 236
14 Aug 2010 #10
Corruption is part of life in almost every country.

Everything has a level / threshold, PL,s is still rather high to my liking.

Poles are afraid to speak out of line? Really?

Depends what circles you are involved with.

Better? It is getting better all the time

No, not with the present ruling party. People say they are happy with the peace, ( meaning they are happy not to be investigated ) that they have been left with a free hand, as they likewise leave the gov. with a free hand.

This is where corruption still exists, and with gov. officials involved. ( always these affairs are publicized through the media ) ...... every week, at times.

With this current understanding " its not getting better all the time " but is standing in one place and not moving forward as rapidly as it could.

This is only my personal opinion, but what the heck that,s what debates are all about, eh ?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Aug 2010 #11
True, the problem is ineptitude and passivity, HIT. They laugh it off yet do little about it. That tells me that it is accepted, albeit tacitly. Buck passing galore!

Defo, it depends on the circles :)

My statement was too general. I was talking about some efforts to intervene like the one a couple of years back into curbing corruption in the Ekstraklasa and Pulchar leagues. Football is a main source and I was referring to that. Sorry, you couldn't have known that.

Let's talk specifically now. Poland could benefit from wiping the slate clean by embracing openness and transparency. I'm talking here about the 'lustracja'. Kommie is eager to play it the Chinese way by sweeping it under the carpet by confiscating incriminating info. JK, to his credit, wanted to reopen this chapter and hold people to account. Those with a clean conscience shouldn't resist!
mactifosi999
10 Mar 2011 #12
A journalist was recently prosecuted for making the assertion that the late President Lech Kaczynski was an idiot, which he plainly was.

It is illegal to publically criticise or insult a politician, so it's not very free.

If you are a foreigner you will regularly experience discrimination and there is not much you can do about it - I include government departments in that.

God help you if you are not white or gay - you will receive physical and verbal abuse on a weekly basis.
The police are not capable or interested in helping anyone who suffers this type of abuse.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
10 Mar 2011 #13
It is illegal to publically criticise or insult a politician, so it's not very free.

They can't be prosecuted while in office, either. Some nasty stories surface from time to time about politicians getting off various crimes like causing accidents whilst driving under the influence.

If you are a foreigner you will regularly experience discrimination and there is not much you can do about it - I include government departments in that.

A cow at Poczta Polska once told me I pronounce my own name incorrectly. In the UK she'd be fired for saying that to a Pole.

God help you if you are not white or gay - you will receive physical and verbal abuse on a weekly basis.

I'm gay and haven't really had any problems like that from Poles, either physical or verbal. Oddly enough, the only nasty comments about my sexuality have come from British expats in Warsaw. I have lived in PL for 11 years.

The police are not capable or interested in helping anyone who suffers this type of abuse.

This bit is also untrue - the Polish police aren't great, but they're improving and will pursue anything that is likely to lead to a successful prosecution. I am speaking about Warsaw - the story out in the boondocks may well be different.
sovereign_man - | 19
17 Mar 2011 #14
America does not live up to its freedom rights so don't feel too bad, you are not alone.
Lodz_The_Boat 32 | 1,535
17 Mar 2011 #15
dignity, freedom, respect, rights, equality, and so on...

Although a very interesting topic ... are you going to judge us on the basis of the USA concept of freedom? If so, then you will not find peace.

I really think that Poles are quite free in trying to find their own way of living according to their choices. We have economic limitations, which are not enforced on us directly to restrict our freedom.

I do think that dignity must be earned by the person ... respect aswell. Rights are there, equality is there, so on ... I don't know what this means...

We are a nation which never really willfully accepted occupation and slavery.

Our women are free to chose the man they wish to be with ... although we are family oriented people, and not exactly having western principles (although the penetration is there quite a lot).

Our men as just as free ...
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
17 Mar 2011 #16
Yes it does, and the present government is determined that is the case, unlike the previous PIS government who was willing to spy on journalists, and limit freedom of speech.

Rydzyk

Ignore him the guy is a fool, i took him to task on this issue on a previous thread and he was incapable of giving any specifics, is just total BS

It is illegal to publically criticise or insult a politician

That is just plainly not true. If anything people in Poland go over the to with criticism and insults of politicians. political satire in Poland is big.
OP pgtx 30 | 3,158
17 Mar 2011 #17
are you going to judge us on the basis of the USA concept of freedom?

and where is that come from?

limit freedom of speech.

some want to control the internet in Poland...

there is no freedom as in definition...
Lodz_The_Boat 32 | 1,535
17 Mar 2011 #18
You wanna be as free as an animal?

I think humans like to have a fence surrounding their homes ... and thats not limiting freedom, but a perimeter signifying safety.
OP pgtx 30 | 3,158
17 Mar 2011 #19
You wanna be as free as an animal?

and you think animals are free?
Harry
25 Sep 2016 #21
[Moved from]: Poland plunges 29 places in the World Press Freedom Index

The 2016 World Press Freedom Index produced by Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has been released. Poland has plunged 29 places, from 18th all the way down to 47th. As the authors of the index noted:

Shortly after winning the 2015 elections, the conservative Law and Justice party passed a media law empowering the government to appoint and dismiss the heads of the state radio and TV broadcast media. It took effect in January 2016. Under a second law being prepared, the contracts of all the employees of these media would be terminated. Alarmed to see a European Union member violate fundamental EU values, the European Commission launched a procedure designed to ensure respect for the rule of law in Poland.

rsf.org/en/poland

Pity that they didn't mention that 'winning' the 2015 election consisted of drawing the votes of roughly the same percentage of Poles as the percentage of Poles who joined the Communist party back in the day.
NowyPoster
25 Sep 2016 #22
the 2015 election consisted of drawing the votes of roughly the same percentage of Poles as the percentage of Poles who joined the Communist party back in the day

If quantities would matter as mach as qualities then one vote would count as much as the other one - presumed fundament of democracy. But beside this can you provide the exact numbers?

The 2016 World Press Freedom Index produced by Reporters Without Borders.

No more brownie points scoring.
Looker - | 1,054
16 Jan 2018 #23
Well I can confirm, that the freedom of speech in Poland does of course exist... althought it's still strictly censored.
But if your opinion is favorable and flattering, you should not worry, your voice is very welcomed.
My example: I did noticed an article and report on a local website about how cristal clear is the air in the town where I live. There were only two comments - let's say neutral - I was astonished that nobody gave his honest opinion how it really is. So I just expressed my thoughts (in a quite polite way), neverthless my comment dissapeared after a few hours..

I suspect, that the same happened to a number of others. I just wasted my time.


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