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Poland's Economy Is Booming! The EU's Success Story?


teflcat 5 | 1,032
10 Aug 2012 #631
Has it really?No mister, it has not.Time to face reality

I guess you would have to have lived through the changes to understand.

Poles own nothing and make nothing

You really need to get out more.

The "elites" had it all planned.

What, the Elders of Zion?
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
10 Aug 2012 #632
I suppose I used the word "booming" as that is the word the press tend to use. "Expanding its offering, building for future employment and enterprise, and generally prospering" might've been better. That's how it can seem, but taking a closer look a lot of it might also be based on consumer-driven demand which can't be sustained if unemployment rises and demand slumps. IF. Not sure yet,

Now,Poland doesn't make ************** is imported

I have had a struggle to buy Polish while I am here. It costs a fair bit more usually, but I have wherever possible bought Polish shoes and Polish kitchen electricals. Shop staff will remember me as I always ask. Occasionally I have to buy non Polish as in the item mentioned on my consumer rights thread.
Wroclaw Boy
10 Aug 2012 #634
krakowpost.com/article/1721

Shall I return to Prices thread where we had a nice discussion some time ago? :):):):)

Why, because i said something you dont like? take it like a man you great big girl.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
10 Aug 2012 #635
Hey, guys, are we going to reach 20 pages like this thread?:
Poland's Economy Is Booming! The EU's Success Story?

How about the mods merge it rather than delete this thread. Thanks.
pawian 161 | 9,971
10 Aug 2012 #636
krakowpost.com/article/1721

So you are a liar after all, Wrocław Boy. :):):)

You said about leaving

absolutely 4 million leaving in 8 years, says it all really.

while your article says about working abroad:
The Polish Press Agency has reported that according to a CBOS poll, one in five Poles has worked abroad in the past five years, and one percent of those surveyed is currently working abroad.

Don`t you see the difference, fruit bat with the intelligence of a vegetable bat? :):):):) Leaving means emmigrating for good. Working abroad means simply working abroad.

Why, because i said something you dont like? take it like a man you great big girl.

I can`t take it like a big girl because people with your IQ cause a state of depressive irritation in me. You spout bulshyt like vomit and refuse to take responsibility for polluting the public place.
grubas 12 | 1,391
10 Aug 2012 #637
I guess you would have to have lived through the changes to understand.

I have lived thru the changes and I saw destruction of Polish industry with my own eyes.

I suppose I used the word "booming" as that is the word the press tend to use.

Official propaganda.Learn some Polish and read comments under these "succes" stories on Polish sites you will learn what is general sentiment in this country.

have had a struggle to buy Polish while I am here. It costs a fair bit more usually, but I have wherever possible bought Polish shoes and Polish kitchen electricals. Shop staff will remember me as I always ask. Occasionally I have to buy non Polish as in the item mentioned on my consumer rights thread.

I wish you all the best with whatever you plan to do in this country but if you asked me for advice I would say "Go back to UK,it can not be worse than Poland".This Poland is destined to collapse and the sooner it happen the better.
Wroclaw Boy
10 Aug 2012 #638
Leaving means emmigrating for good. Working abroad means simply working abroad.

No, leaving means leaving, 3.3 million Poles have left Poland in the past 10 years to work abroad, whether they come back or not is not really important, what is important is that the cosy BOOMING country you so biasedly defend drove 3.3 MILION to leave within 10 years as they needed the money. I would say that less than 5% leave Poland with the intention of emmigrating for good.
grubas 12 | 1,391
10 Aug 2012 #639
3.3 million Poles have left Poland in the past 10 years to work abroad,

And people are still leaving.

would say that less than 5% leave Poland with the intention of emmigrating for good.

True,but then they realize that life can be different and they no more have any reason to go back to this opressive and crooked country ran by the same regime for the last 23 years.
pawian 161 | 9,971
10 Aug 2012 #640
No, leaving means leaving, 3.3 million Poles have left Poland in the past 10 years to work abroad.

The connotations of leaving the country:
banish
emigrate
visa
depatriate
port of entry
port
evacuate
push factor
customhouse
banishment
expel
forsake
rustication
stock-route
abjuration
skip

wordnik.com/words/leave%20the%20country

3.3 MILION to leave within 10 years as they needed the money.

Do you know how to do the sums? Divide 3.3 million by 10 years. How many per year????

Come on, boy, Poland has had 38.5 million population for at least 10 years. :):):)

Never mind. See you, guys, we are leaving for 2 weeks. Have fun.
grubas 12 | 1,391
10 Aug 2012 #641
And Poles earned 20$ monthly for producing that stuff.

And that was the reason to give the whole industry away to foraigners?Again,where is Polish Samsung,Hyudai or LG?
Are you PO member?How much do they pay you for posting this crap?(I know for sure that they pay people for posting crap like this).
Wroclaw Boy
10 Aug 2012 #642
True,but then they realize that life can be different and they no more have any reason to go back to this opressive and crooked country ran by the same regime for the last 23 years.

They leave and then go back to only realise why they left in the first place......money, and off they go again.

Do you know how to do the sums? Divide 3.3 million by 10 years. How many per year????

How angry does it make you feel that the UK provided more jobs for Poles than Poland in 2005? People like you, with your ever increasing ignorance are part of the problem, not the solution, quit being part of the problem and just take a look around.

Come on, boy, Poland has had 38.5 million population for at least 10 years.

Thats very thin.
grubas 12 | 1,391
10 Aug 2012 #643
They leave and then go back to only realise why they left in the first place......money, and off they go again.

Say "Some" and I will agree.I didn't leave because i can (or maybe even not) make few more dollars in America and I know many people who left Poland for the same reason I did,because the see how rotten this system is and they refuse to be part of it.This few more dollars is really not worth being far away from family and the place I grew up in.It is not.
Hankie123 - | 4
11 Aug 2012 #644
gdyniaguy
Here are some figures for comparison (source: International Monetary Fund 2010-2011).

A list of EU countries by GDP (PPP) per capita (an indicator of a country's standard of living):

Luxembourg 80,119 Intl. $
Netherlands 42,183
Austria 41,822
Sweden 40,394
Ireland 39,639
Germany 37,897
Belgium 37,737
Denmark 37,152
Finland 36,236
United Kingdom 36,090
France 35,156
Spain 30,626
Italy 30,462
...................................................
Cyprus 29,074
Slovenia 28,642
Czech Republic 27,062
Greece 26,294
Malta 25,428
Portugal 23,361
Slovakia 23,304
Estonia 20,380
Poland 20,334
..................................................
Hungary 19,591
Lithuania 18,856
Latvia 15,662
Bulgaria 13,597
Romania 12,476
Warszawette - | 128
11 Aug 2012 #645
Hi!

Completely irrelevant to throw figures "just like that". "Per capita", it means that they divide the amount of wealth by the number of inhabitants and therefore it does not mean whether everybody is rich or poor and does not show the reality of the said society. Some are rather equalitarian, like northern countries, some in the middle like Germany or France and some are rather unequalitarian (mostly in the East of Europe).

Throwing numbers and figures like they do in North Korea does not make any sense. As to Poland, when we live in Poland, we all know that the government (like all governments) lies, that the economy in Poland belongs to foreigners and that most Poles are poor and that's all. No need to pretend all is marvellous in Poland (or anywhere else) because it is not. Such attitude is pathetic and shows how a lot of (I am not saying "the") Poles are full of complexes. In fact, people of Polish origin on PF are exactly like all people of foreign origin: they seem to seek revenge for their parents' and grandparents' harship, poverty and humiliation that they want to believe that their country of origin has become a wonder and the inhabitants thereof are simply the very best. I have witnessed such attitude for instance among North Africans in France and Belgium, Turks in Germany and also Pakistanis and Indians in England - their home country has suddenly become the world's diamand. Those of Polish origin think and act exactly this way and this is "psy".

Of course, Poland has moved ahead a lot (but needless to say thanks to Westerners and their money) but is still a very poor country (but need to move away from the glitter and blingbling of parts of Warsaw and Krakow - what most foreigners don't do - to realize it).

Poland is in such a way and that's all.....

Have a nice week-end!
boletus 30 | 1,366
11 Aug 2012 #646
Another marvel of generalization! You are a mile off the target. Look around and you will easily find gazillions of disgruntled, grumpy, discontented Poles - complaining on PF, in media and in real life. I'd rather see few optimistic ones here for a change. What an arrogant "anthropologist" you are. Should I say - TYPICAL French, following your brilliant example above? Nay, just you.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
11 Aug 2012 #647
that the economy in Poland belongs to foreigners and that most Poles are poor and that's all.

They are? If they're so poor, why are the shopping centre car parks full of huge cars (bigger and newer than you'll find in Sweden for example)?

but is still a very poor country

It really isn't. Trying to claim that it's a very poor country when it has a very high Human Development Index score is just - please. Poor countries don't have (almost) universal health care and universal free education.

I think you want it to be poor so you can lord it over them, to be honest.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
11 Aug 2012 #648
When I first came to live here I agreed to take part in a Newsweek survey on earnings. I was astonished to come out in the top 1%. Twelve years on I'd say I probably sit somewhere in the mid-upper half. You know what? I see that in a positive way.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
11 Aug 2012 #649
Twelve years on I'd say I probably sit somewhere in the mid-upper half. You know what? I see that in a positive way.

No harm in it - I think Poland is actually a society in which one can move up (and down...) quickly should they so wish.

I know of one guy in Poznan who started with literally nothing - his parents are alcoholics, they wanted him to leave school to work to pay for their alcohol - you know the story. He scraped a pass in his Matura, studied part time and worked as much as he could Monday-Friday afternoon. He had - just - enough money to survive and no more, by his own admission, he was frequently buying the leftovers from the markets at the end of the day that would be thrown away.

Same guy 14 years later is now driving around a brand new Mercedes, has a big house, a lovely wife and two lovely children. He's easily in the top 5% in the country, too.

If it was such a dreadful country, he never would have managed this.
Buggsy 8 | 98
11 Aug 2012 #650
Banks don't hand out mortgages here so easily, so they make their money on smaller loans.

I am here as well and that sounds logical coz after the subprime mortgage crisis they all moved
into other areas of making a quick buck: risky investment vehicles and short term loans.
I know from 2008 it became almost impossible for an ordinary man to get a mortgage because it's about the only area they have tightened very well in the banking industry.

The other areas are not so tightly monitored or regulated.
Anything below 50k is considered a small loan by most of the Banks here.
Just check the flyers for quick loans in your letterbox or handed out in town and ask yourself who's behind most of them.
Jacus Aucamp - | 12
11 Aug 2012 #651
Twelve years on I'd say I probably sit somewhere in the mid-upper half. You know what? I see that in a positive way.....

.....Wow, really??? mid-upper half you say....~Being a teacher in Bielsk Podlaski....That's such a poor region....

Makes you think....
Zibi - | 336
11 Aug 2012 #652
Being a teacher in Bielsk Podlaski....That's such a poor region....

Perhaps statistically it is poor, but apparently not everyone is poor there. Oh, and they get beautiful countryside, clean air and lots of space - all for free!
peterweg 36 | 2,316
11 Aug 2012 #653
Those call centers sent abroad to cheap labor countries are a disgrace. They move to India for English and North Africa for French.

There are many jobs that are not in call centers, what are the minority of offshore business. Companies like IBM, Google, Cisco, Wipro, Credit Suisse do not have any call centre requirements at all. Its back off/development work - you don't move that at the drop of a hat.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
11 Aug 2012 #654
I don't speak Polish but understand a few words so I could be wrong - seems TVP Wroclaw is letting part of its offices out (renting space in its building to third parties). That seems to be the ad on TV I just saw. Never seen that before. Also noticing more empty shops in Wroc recently, with signs saying To Let usually just in Polish but occasionally also in English.

That said, got stuck at a bus stop for 35 mins today and saw brand new car after car whizzing past - Range Rovers, VWs, Audis. Plenty of money here or plenty bought with those "lower" value loans.
Ironside 48 | 9,899
11 Aug 2012 #655
And Poles earned 20$ monthly for producing that stuff.

Wow!? You mean Poland's economy is booming because you can earn 200$ a week for spreading crap on line? How that develop infrastructure in Poland? How that make officially open motorway closed after few day again to finish unfinished motorway after lying to people triumphantly about its completion as yet another proof of professionalism and efficiency of the present gov.

When the truth is that are professional liars and that is the only thing they are good at.
Accordingly Poland's economy is not booming and if you were a face and name instead of silly moniker you wouldn't dare to lie so outrageously. Because you would have to eat your hat when(not if)a **** hits the fan!

but needless to say thanks to Westerners and their money

Oh yes thats the fact and not wishful thinking! Not!
You better present some prove of your claim, because otherwise your talk can be dismissed as yet another self justification of people who are driven by self interest and only their guilt and complexes induce them to make such laughable claims.

have a good one
legend 3 | 664
11 Aug 2012 #656
Polands economy is growing (which is fine and all)...

all the while its birthrate is low as hell (much like Europe and especially Eastern Europe). And if the trend does continue there wont be much of a Poland left.

and all the money in the world will mean nothing.
boletus 30 | 1,366
12 Aug 2012 #657
How that develop infrastructure in Poland?

A new tram route to Franowo was officially opened in Poznań today, August 11, 2012. The new tram route has a length of 2.5 km. Much of it - 1070 meters - is in three tunnels, the longest of which is 366 meters long and connects the stops Piaśnicka / Market and Piaśnicka / Kurlandzka. For this reason it is jocularly dubbed "the Poznan's subway". About 270 million zlotys was invested in the project, 40% provided by EU.

The route to Franowo was supposed to be ready for Euro 2012. However, the official opening was postponed pending inspections from the Firefighter Department and the County Building Inspector. The consents were finally obtained on July 27 and the Municipal Transport Company (MPK) started training tram drivers for the underground driving.

Watch the simulation video made by the developer, Bifinger Berger Budownictwo.

BTW, did you noticed the Polish word "Budownictwo", not "Developers" in the name of the company? How refreshing for a change. :-)
grubas 12 | 1,391
12 Aug 2012 #658
BTW, did you noticed the Polish word "Budownictwo", not "Developers" in the name of the company?

I noticed "Bifinger Berger" and doesn't seem very Polish to me.
boletus 30 | 1,366
12 Aug 2012 #659
Yes, the original company is German and since 1970s - international. In 1994 it bought stake in Polish company Hydrobudowa-6. On 1 February 2008, the Bilfinger Berger Budownictwo was established, which incorporated the most experienced and most dynamic construction companies operating in Poland. The core of the Bilfinger Berger Budownictwo are: Płockie Przedsiębiorstwo Robót Mostowych (Płock Bridge Works), Warszawskie Przedsiębiorstwo Robót Drogowych (Warsaw's Road Construction) and Hydrobudowa-6. Each of these three companies is a company with a recognized reputation in the construction market.

bilfinger.pl/pl/firma/historia

The company employs 3000 people and invites anybody qualified to join. You can send them your CV on line if you wish.

This done - Would you like to add something on topic for a change? I was talking about Poznań "subway", evidently built by an experienced company.
Zibi - | 336
12 Aug 2012 #660
Way to go Poznań! Congratulations. Step by step we're all progressing in our country.


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