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Witamy, Guest
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Too much change in Poland?!


Polonius3 1,015 | 12,527    
17 Jan 2010  #1

Poland is often referred to as conservative because of upholding traditons, the family, traditonal values, religious beliefs, etc. On the otehr hand, at the official level there is so much change in Poland that the result is instability.

**Our American Constitution was promulgated in the late 18th century and continues to function with only a handful of updating amendments. Poland had 4 constitutions in the 20th century (7 if we include interim Little Constitutions).

**The educational system is constantly being tampered with: originally 7 (primary) + 4 (secondary), tehn 8 +4, then Gierek's 10-year Soviet-style school, now the primary-junior secodnary and senior secondary, not counting various forms of vocational training.

**Health is perhaps the worst example. The cumbersome commie-era health service was reformed by Buzek into pre-war-style Kasy Chorych, but then the post-commies won the election, swept them away and set up a Naitonal Health Fund so they could put their own cronies into exec posts in its local branches....

**Constantly changing tax laws not only bedevil Poles but scare foreign investors away.
What do you think of these constant, mostly politically motivated changes, not on the basis of merit and rarely for the better?

convex 20 | 3,985    
17 Jan 2010  #2

On the otehr hand, at the official level there is so much change in Poland that the result is instability.

I think that the best example of that is the lifespan of a political party. It seems that parties come and go with the election cycles. Parties that once controlled the government just disappear a couple years later.
espana 17 | 912    
17 Jan 2010  #3

poland is going to change even more , wait for the EU to send to poland the new muslim era and the hungry africans

they will change the church for mosque,etc etc

thank jesus that we bring south americans to spain and not so many muslim.

anyway a nightmare will be :(
McCoy 27 | 1,284    
17 Jan 2010  #4

you had been fcuked by arabs for ages. cant see anything good about it, darky boy. youve got all these gay marriages, teen transexuals and sheep shagging culture. i dont think anything like that will ever happen in PL.
BrutalButcher - | 393    
17 Jan 2010  #5

south americans to spai

The difference is the religion. The danger is kinda similar.
bullfrog 6 | 604    
17 Jan 2010  #6

thank jesus that we bring south americans to spain and not so many muslim.

Have you checked your history books? Arabs were in Spain much before South Americans and did spend an awful long time there.. Spain owes some of its best architecture to them (Alhambra in Granada, "la Mezquita" Mosque in Cordoba)

What do you think of these constant, mostly politically motivated changes, not on the basis of merit and rarely for the better?

I think what the Poles and Poland have achieved in only 20 years of freedom is quite remarkable. If you add to this the 20 years between the wars during which Poland was also independant that is still only 40 years altogether over a 200 year span (since the beginning of the XiXth century). Poland has achieved much more during this short period than either the US or Europe over an equivalent period.
espana 17 | 912    
17 Jan 2010  #7

macoy ,the baby factories set up in Wroclaw to fuel their child prostitution and pûrnography industries is finished
the new era for Poland are the Muslims send it by the eu :)
Ironside 46 | 8,820    
17 Jan 2010  #8

i dont think anything like that will ever happen in PL.

wishful thinking eh?

Political games are about who will screw whom,I wouldn't mind it if those in charge had Poland best interest at heart. Unfortunately in Poland these in power seems not to be interested or know what it is to build strong country.

espana

What, haven't you been milked today?
McCoy 27 | 1,284    
17 Jan 2010  #9

we moved our factories to spain. much better environment for settling the business there. and people are more willing to work as a prossies. no wonder that this perv almodovar is spanish and makes his films in spain (:
bullfrog 6 | 604    
17 Jan 2010  #10

Unfortunately in Poland these in power seems not to be interested or know what it is to build strong country

So what is it that is needed to build a strong country? Present your ideas and then run for office, to see how many Poles agree with you..
Ironside 46 | 8,820    
17 Jan 2010  #11

So what is it that is needed to build a strong country

first kill bankers!
espana 17 | 912    
17 Jan 2010  #12

business

we moved our factories to spain

polan It will always be the Mexico of Europe.
bullfrog 6 | 604    
17 Jan 2010  #13

first kill bankers!

That's a bad start..Banking and prostitution are the two oldest professions in the world.. You cannot have a strong country without them..
king polkakamon - | 546    
17 Jan 2010  #14

Banking and prostitution are the two oldest professions in the world.. Y

Prostitution is much more vital than banking.However I see a sharp decline in world economy.
The reason:Incompetent folks in key positions and the competent ones are marginalized and have absolutely no desire or motivation to help,I would tell the opposite they have great desire to misinform the stupid and destroy them.
Ironside 46 | 8,820    
17 Jan 2010  #15

So what is it that is needed to build a strong country? Present your ideas and then run for office, to see how many Poles agree with you..

it doesn't work like that, well I could present my views but is up for those in power to know and to implement it!

If they don't know or don't care what they are doing there in the first place - they are frauds! And I don't care for excuses that something cannot be done - you cannot, be gone looser!

Problem in Poland is that those loser's because they live off country and have some money, believe themselves cool and successful when in fact they are clueless idiots.

polan It will always be the Mexico of Europe.

do you contribute here fraud, you are not spanish, and you are troll, and you should be baned, be gone evil spirit !
king polkakamon - | 546    
17 Jan 2010  #16

Yes,they thought they could fool the Europeans forever.These stupid,incompetent so called ''economists'' applaying the marvellous ''creative accounting.''
Crow 145 | 6,919    
18 Jan 2010  #17

Too much change in Poland?!

give more changes to Poland
Rogalski 5 | 94    
18 Jan 2010  #18

I agree. Every time I go shopping, the shop assistant always wants some awkward amount of change. Something costs ZL 16 and you give ZL 20, (s)he wants you to hand over ZL 21. So yes there is too much change in PL - especially those fiddly little groszy. Fah!
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595    
18 Jan 2010  #19

the shop assistant always wants some awkward amount of change

I guess them as much change as I can, just to get rid of the groszy.
delphiandomine 86 | 16,477    
18 Jan 2010  #20

especially those fiddly little groszy.

I wish they would scrap the 1 and 2gr coins, they're worthless and abolishing them would speed up things considerably. All they have to do is adopt the model seen in some Euro countries - the final total is rounded up or down 5gr and voila. Problem solved, and much easier on everyone.
jonni 16 | 2,491    
18 Jan 2010  #21

I wish they would scrap the 1 and 2gr coins,

Me too, but the (albeit subtle) effect on the inflation rate means that countries hang on to very small coins for as long as they can.

I save mine and give them to charity collections.
Harry 81 | 13,362    
18 Jan 2010  #22

I always try to carry a one grosze coin. They are very useful to leave as a tip for a crap waiter (if you leave no tip, they just think you're cheap; leave a single grosze and they know you think they suck). They're also good tips to give to taxi drivers who try to take you the long way round (because they figure a foreigner won't know the way) or who after you tell them to stop keep driving until the meter clicks on one more notch.
jwojcie 2 | 763    
18 Jan 2010  #23

**Our American Constitution was promulgated in the late 18th century and continues to function with only a handful of updating amendments. Poland had 4 constitutions in the 20th century (7 if we include interim Little Constitutions).

This is uncomparable.... During this time, first Poland didn't existed, then existed as a multiethnic entity, then didn't existed again, then existed as a monoethnic communist dictaturship, and since 89' Poland is democratic republic. So it is not surprising that the law was changing contantly...

**Educational reform -> splitting highschools into two separate levels. In my opinion it was a mistake and unnecessary change, but it is hard to see politics in that. Gov. really thought it would be better system and they had some merits. Other than that and huge boom in private universities there wasn't any structural changes. So I wouldn't say it is constant change.

**Health care is not changing much, there was a try with those "Kasy Chorych" but it failed, and now we are back where we were for good and for bad.

**about tax'es I have mixed feelings. They are of course to high :-) Are they complicated, I'm not sure. My friend told me, that Polish base tax act has about a few dozen pages and British base tax act has about a few hundred pages. Judging from that it seems that Polish tax law could be more complicated ;-) So maybe it is not a problem with a law itself but with arbitrary execution of that law.
pawian 127 | 6,554    
8 Sep 2012  #24

Poland is often referred to as conservative because of upholding traditons, the family, traditonal values, religious beliefs, etc.

Yes.

On the otehr hand, at the official level there is so much change in Poland that the result is instability. Poland had 4 constitutions in the 20th century (7 if we include interim Little Constitutions).

Comparing traditional values to official level isn`t a good idea, I suppose.
WielkiPolak 57 | 1,030    
8 Sep 2012  #25

wait for the EU to send to poland the new muslim era and the hungry africans

But isn't the unofficial hidden reason that Turkey is not being let in to the EU, because it is a Muslim nation and if it gets let in then Muslims from there can travel freely in Europe and cross boarders with no problems? I think Europe is starting to realize slowly that is did not have its eye on the ball with Islam but I am not sure if it is yet ready to embrace its foundation again, Christianity.

]I wish they would scrap the 1 and 2gr coins

Haha yeah and the shopkeepers [tend to be women] always as you if you have 1 or 2 because they are too lazy to look for it in their till. They have even started to do this in Polish shops in Britain ['ma penna' or 'ma dwa penny.]'



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