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How will BREXIT affect the immigrants in UK and Poland.



Ziemowit 8 | 2,593    
24 Jun 2016  #91

the Junckers, Schultzes, Timmermanses, etc. do not fault the bureacratised and ideologised EU but blame Cameron for calling a referendum in the first place.

I'd be very much surprised if they did otherwise. Calling for referenda or calling the bureaucrats in Brussels to listen to the voice of people has been conveniently dismissed by them as "democratic populism" so far. If you don't know what I mean, just remember the British gang on the PF calling the results of the latest election in Poland an "18% democracy" or something like that. Now this "democratic populism" has slapped Brussels in the face.

Getting down to a deeper level, there are simply too many people on a relatively small island such as Britain (and in England in particular). However loudly the libtards (including the libtards on the PF) may praIse immigration, an ordinary man-in-the-street of the UK feels that enough is enough and believes that the continuous inflow of people to the UK will be better controlled if the UK is out of the EU than if it is in. Another matter is whether the goal to stop people from coming to the UK is achievable at all. But maybe despite the fact the Roman Empire didn't achieve that, the tiny remains of the British Empire led by brave Cameron are just able to do so.


nothanks - | 663    
24 Jun 2016  #92

Common theme with leave/stay crowd: both were unhappy with the EU. The stay crowd simply argued Britain should become more involved to fix problems
Dougpol1 20 | 1,414    
24 Jun 2016  #93

The stay crowd simply argued Britain should become more involved to fix problems

So did Churchill.

And now Scotland and Northern Ireland will demand their right to stay in the EU. And I am with them, not the scum Nigel.
Atch 12 | 1,754    
24 Jun 2016  #94

Unexpected results may include Northern Ireland joining Eire in a GDR style merger

And this demonstrates just how little you understand of anything other than American politics. I suppose this is the nonsense being churned out by the US media? There would be civil war in the North before that happens. Googe Loyalist/Unionist Northern Ireland and you'll see why, they can't even cope with the most basic power sharing. They had to be dragged kicking and screaming into the present situation.
szarlotka 8 | 2,210    
24 Jun 2016  #95

Amazed at the result. Still gutted about how the people of this country have been treated by the two camps in the debate leading up to the referendum. Lies, half truths and startling omissions from both sides. No clear understanding of a transition plan on one hand and from the other camp no indication on what the EU future direction might look like.

I think the younger people are generally despondent. They, rightly, see it a decision on their future taken by people who are not worried about what happens as they will be gone. In my view the result would have been completely the other way if it was for membership of the EEC and not the EU. The EU has only itself to blame for a largely undemocratic federalisation policy.

That said the big excuse for not governing our country properly has been taken away. The onus is on the UK now to address better education and to remove the erosions of our personal freedom and liberties that have taken place over the last 20 years or so. This country needs to improve in so many ways to give those young people what they deserve. Whether our politicians can take the opportunity to use this sea change to address the improvements remains to be seen but as an elderly cynic I am not holding my breath.
Religio    
24 Jun 2016  #96

Atch - anything other than American politics

That notion was advanced by one of the commentators on Polish TV. I haven't bothered to follow the American reaction which in this case is inconsequential.
Atch 12 | 1,754    
24 Jun 2016  #97

That notion was advanced by one of the commentators on Polish TV.

Shameful ignorance on their part. And it equally demonstrates that you're falling into the trap of quoting media sources without thinking about who the source is and what qualifications they have to be commenting. Journalists are a very mixed bag you know.
smurf 39 | 1,999    
24 Jun 2016  #98

I haven't bothered to follow the American reaction which in this case is inconsequential

That's pretty strange that you haven't Polonius, seeing as you are an American

So, I see we're not completely ignoring this poster until he goes back to his actual username?
chlopek3    
24 Jun 2016  #99

And the irony is the newly empowered Conservative right wing, can now focus on dismantling the Welfare state, privatising the NHS and raising taxes, which will directly affect the working classes who voted for Brexit.

So well done to all the racists,ignorant, uneducated, petty nationalist for destroying the UK as a serious country.
rozumiemnic 9 | 3,347    
24 Jun 2016  #100

chopek just because somebody voted for Brexit doesnt make them 'racist' or 'uneducated' - far from it in my experience. Many people voted that way because they are sick of hearing that kind of Blairite nonsense.
UKandEU    
24 Jun 2016  #101

European Union was a disaster for every british person.

Waves and waves of criminals from Eastern Europe, and waves of invading islamists who were planning what islamists muslims usually do.

It makes all the sense in the world that a majority of british wanted to end this nightmare

and it is a normal result of forcing free countries to take in hundrds of thousands of soldiers islamists under laughable, pathetic excuses ("poor poor poor refugees") that not even one single sane person in the mind ever believed anyways
johnny reb 13 | 2,481    :-(
24 Jun 2016  #102

Now this "democratic populism" has slapped Brussels in the face.

Right on and Poland should do it next to show Merkel that she doesn't have sole right to destroy countries cultures.

an ordinary man-in-the-street of the UK feels that enough is enough and believes that the continuous inflow of people to the UK will be better controlled if the UK is out of the EU

Absolutely, the British wanted their country back, their borders back and the drain of their $$$$ to immigrants to stop.

Waves and waves of criminals from Eastern Europe, and waves of invading islamists who were planning what islamists muslims usually do.It makes all the sense in the world that a majority of british wanted to end this nightmare

We have been relentlessly expressing this to the low information liberal voters on this forum.
In the long run things will be much better for Britain.
I do have to say also that Brits have got more guts than I gave them credit for.
Now Poland's turn to stand as strong, keep the zloty, take in no immigrants, tell Merkel to butt out, kick out all the liberal ex pats and their vile influence, vote to leave the EU and keep Poland Polish.
Lyzko 17 | 3,659    
24 Jun 2016  #103

I read this morning on Yahoo-News that the Parliament might try and foil the Brexit:-)

Let's hope and pray, as the decision against Cameron by Farage is sheer madness for the European economy (including Britain) as well as for the world markets!!!

Trump supported the Brexit from the start. Well, we know what a dumbbell he isLOL
jon357 70 | 12,786    
24 Jun 2016  #104

There's a chance. Under the law governing referendums, it can be repeated if the margin is less than a specific amount. That may happen - time will tell and it's still very very early days.
SilesiaExplorer    
24 Jun 2016  #105

As the Irish did with the Euro "keep voting until you get the result you want"
Atch 12 | 1,754    
24 Jun 2016  #106

You mean the Lisbon Treaty, not the Euro. There was no referendum regarding currency.
rozumiemnic 9 | 3,347    
24 Jun 2016  #107

Anyway as Britain has no history of referenda it is a bit strange that the British people were suddenly offered one, isnt it?
adamm19830 10 | 43    
24 Jun 2016  #108

Merged: As a British national how does brexit complicate my move to Poland?

Hello,

Now that the Brexit has been confirmed I need to ask a question.

I am planning to move to Poland from the UK with my family (polish wife and our 2 children). I'm expecting it to be September when we move.

As a British national how does brexit complicate my move or is there a period where I can still move freely until it everything regarding leaving is confirmed.

Thanks
Vincent 9 | 811  Moderator  
24 Jun 2016  #109

From the UK point of view, it will take a minimum of two years to leave the EU, so nothing will change much in this period.
terri 1 | 1,244    
24 Jun 2016  #110

No, as I understand it the TWO years is the maximum time that it should take. I have now heard that Germany is so 'fed up' with Britain, it wants to speed up the process.
TheOther 5 | 3,063    
24 Jun 2016  #111

I have now heard that Germany is so 'fed up' with Britain, it wants to speed up the process.

Not only Germany, but the EU in general. They will not give the U.K. a special treatment with free access to the European market. It will cost the Brits big time.

theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/24/europe-plunged-crisis-britain-votes-leave-eu-european-union

"The EU's top leaders have said they expect the UK to act on its momentous vote to leave the union "as soon as possible, however painful that process may be" and that there will be "no renegotiation".
Vincent 9 | 811  Moderator  
24 Jun 2016  #112

No, as I understand it the TWO years is the maximum time that it should take

According to the BBC "The process to take the UK out of the European Union starts with invoking Article 50 and will take at least two years from that point" Leave campaigners have said there is no need to trigger Article 50 immediately, and the trigger point could be long after David Cameron steps down in October. Truth is no one is sure how long it will take, but it is not going to happen anytime soon.
johnny reb 13 | 2,481    :-(
24 Jun 2016  #113

I have now heard that Germany is so 'fed up' with Britain,

Not only Germany, but the EU in general.

And the tweets coming in from France today read, "Good - Bye, Good Riddance" !
The sad part is that the Euro was in very bad shape before the vote and now is in very very bad shape which is only going to get worse.

The whole EU is going to suffer in the coming months/years.
Welfare benefits are sucking the world dry.
mafketis 16 | 4,733    
24 Jun 2016  #114

The stay crowd simply argued Britain should become more involved to fix problems

The problem is that the technocrats in Brussels are not interested in fixing problems (they think the only problem is they don't have enough power to override troublesome decisions by the plebs), they're interested in social meddling and unrealistic regulations.

It's a little sad, the EU had its day (and might yet again) but at present there's no upside for a western prosperous country.
G (undercover)    
24 Jun 2016  #115

Hopefully, this will send a message to the EU leadership that business-as-usual needs to change.

Looking at how this issue has been treated by Gerries/EUnuchs (they spent more time on TK nonsense than on the 2nd largest economy about to leave) it seems they just wanted UK to leave, now EU will become even more faggot dominated and "driving further integration" will become easier.

Another possibilities:
* they will keep repeating voting until results are "correct".
* UK will formally leave EU but most things will stay the same, the same shyt under different name.
Bieganski 15 | 811    
24 Jun 2016  #116

I want to wish all British members of PF a very....
jon357 70 | 12,786    
24 Jun 2016  #117

Truth is no one is sure how long it will take, but it is not going to happen anytime soon

This is true. A lot will depend on the political landscape over the next year, especially in other EU countries.
Religio    
24 Jun 2016  #118

Chemikiem - absolute disaster for Britain

Here is the private view of one Chicago journalist:
My prediction will be that other countries will follow in UK's path. Perhaps Spain will be first, then maybe Portugal. Scotland voted overwhelmingly to stay in EU. But that was not enough. Rumor is that Northern Ireland wants to join with Ireland. Interesting rumor.

According to what I have read, thus far, EU countries are concerned about immigration policies throughout the EU.
This entire scenario is very complicated.
God bless us all.
Bieganski 15 | 811    
25 Jun 2016  #119

Perhaps Spain will be first, then maybe Portugal.

Both have very dire economies. They may want to leave just to free themselves from the yoke of EU regulations. However it is very complicated for them. Firstly both are heavily burdened with debt so being in the EU helps them stay afloat on the international stage. Secondly, unlike the UK, both being in the Eurozone makes any departure of theirs even messier.

Scotland voted overwhelmingly to stay in EU.

Yes but their perspective and experience are very different from those living to the south of their border so it is easy to see why they are more Europhile. Compared to England their economy is not as robust. Therefore Scotland has not been as much as a magnet for migrants as England has. Geographically they are much further north so therefore more rural, colder and darker. Not much of draw on that front either then especially for those young unskilled males from sunnier climes looking for a flash lifestyle in a modern bustling metropolitan region.

EU countries are concerned about immigration policies throughout the EU.

The average citizen in EU countries are the ones who have been concerned. But their dismissive and pretty-much unaccountable governments have not been concerned at all. That's why it has been so out of control and for so long.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,669    
25 Jun 2016  #120

It will harm Britain more than any other country. Proof they are experiencing internal crisis. Rest of the world needs to work toward minimizing damage a rogue, conflicted nation can do.




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