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How will BREXIT affect the immigrants in UK and Poland.



Ziemowit 8 | 2,593    
21 Jun 2016  #61

Slightly off-topic. Would Brexit be much welcomed by the people of France? I asked myself this question before answering the opinion poll in the French quality paper LE FIGARO:

"Souhaitez-vous que la Royaume-Uni reste dans l'Union européenne ?"

lefigaro.fr/actualites/2016/06/21/01001-20160621QCMWWW00109-souhaitez-vous-que-la-royaume-uni-reste-dans-l-union-europeenne.php

It is only after having voted yourself that you can see the results of the poll. I thought the result would be around 50-50, but I was very much surprised to see the majority of those who participated wanted the UK to get out of the European Union (64% "non' against 36 % "oui")! So, enough of entente cordiale with the UK for the frog-eaters?


jon357 70 | 12,786    
21 Jun 2016  #62

Financial Times reporting that UK expats are voting for Brexit no matter what.

According to surveys conducted among people who prove they live elsewhere in the EU but still have a vote in this non-binding referendum, most are voting to remain.

So, enough of entente cordiale with the UK for the frog-eaters?

Typical Le Figaro readers' Anglophobia. Apart from extremists like the awful La Pen person, the general view in France is pro-EU and pro-Britain.

A lot of Brits live in France as immigrants and a lot of French live in Britain as immigrants. Relations are usually excellent.
Atch 12 | 1,754    
21 Jun 2016  #63

Or could it be that the French would like to get out themselves and would like the UK to pave the way? They are a large enough nation to feel that they could go it alone. I think some kind of devolution of the EU in its present form is inevitable but with former members retaining some special relationships with each other. It's no big deal really. It would mean a few decades of a bit of a mess but isn't that the way history works.
jon357 70 | 12,786    
21 Jun 2016  #64

Or could it be that the French would like to get out themselves and would like the UK to pave the way?

Some certainly would, but they're a minority and like in the UK, all major political parties are pro-EU.
johnny reb 13 | 2,478    
21 Jun 2016  #65

This is the way I interpret all this.

The rich aristocrats want to stay in the U.E. as they are getting richer.
The working class want out as they are getting poorer.
Now it is a wait and see how the aristocrats are going to stack the deck so THEY win.
peterweg 36 | 2,272    
21 Jun 2016  #66

Its pretty certain that the pound will fall 20%+ against the dollar and cause a similar rise in inflation, as it did in 2008.

So we all will be much poorer. The poor will suffer most as the most directly affected will be the price of food and the poor spend a higher portion of their money. They will also see they wages under attack from the right wing of the Conservative party who will be voted in by this referendum
Religio    
23 Jun 2016  #67

jon 357 - the elderly and the first time voters

So you oppose democracy by stigmatising voters you disagree with. They must be 100% pro-jon357 or they constitute a danger. Why not disenfrnachise them or, better yet, create a new Endlösung?
jon357 70 | 12,786    
23 Jun 2016  #68

stigmatising v

Perhaps you'd like to tell us precisely how referring to an elderly person as elderly or a first-time voter as a first-time voter 'stigmatising' anyone?

Now calling people 'sluts', 'perverts', 'morons' - well that would be 'stigmatising' someone, wouldn't it, Po.

Don't be mischievous.
Religio    
23 Jun 2016  #69

jon 357 - referring to an elderly person or a first-time voter
You did not simply mention them but stated that they pose a danger. The danger that they may vote for themselves and not the way you wouild want them to?
jon357 70 | 12,786    
23 Jun 2016  #70

hey pose a danger

They do. What JohnnyReb calls "low information voters" pose a danger of this closely divided vote going the wrong way and having long-term repercussions for everyone.

However as it stands, it looks like sanity will prevail though it will be close. Could go either way.

Back on topic please
dolnoslask 2 | 1,161    
23 Jun 2016  #71

"low information voters"

Talking of which it is raining in the UK with floods , this historically has meant that many left leaning scroungers will not leave the house to vote.

We need their support if Britain is to remain, so if you know any give them a call and make sure they vote, I have already called my my sister, my scrounger brother in law will be out voting to stay in the next hour or so.
jon357 70 | 12,786    
23 Jun 2016  #72

Very wise, however demographically most of the demographic you call 'scroungers' are according to the polls more likely to vote leave.

The flooding is fortunately in areas that tend towards the UKippers; this should help counteract the Glastonbury effect.

And the British living in Poland tend towards remain.
dolnoslask 2 | 1,161    
23 Jun 2016  #73

I read a report today that there has been is a surge of Polish people applying for British passports, anyone think there will be problems for EU migrants after the vote either stay or leave ? Will the EU ever reconsider their freedom of movement policy?
jon357 70 | 12,786    
23 Jun 2016  #74

They wouldn't throw anyone out - who would replace them in their jobs? Anyway, it's EU remain/withdrawal that people are voting for, rather than a UKIP/BNP government.

In the EU as a whole, freedom of movement is one of the cornerstones along with freedom of capital, services and labour.
johnny reb 13 | 2,478    
23 Jun 2016  #75

Futures are way up this morning in the U.S.A. telling me someone thinks the U.K. will stay.
poleinus    
24 Jun 2016  #76

It will affect Poland adversely initially. After all, Poland has been getting money from the UK, in addition to many Poles working in the uK. But I think it's better for Poland in the long run to stop accepting aid and to stop perpetuating the brain drain, and lift itself by its bootstraps. The latter will make Poland stronger and wealthier in the long run. Perhaps Poles will have to make do without some luxuries they have become accustomed to in the last few years, a but a few lean years in exchange for a true wealth and stability down the line is nothing.
Nathans    
24 Jun 2016  #77

What about the fact that the British pound value will lose 10-20% within a week - won't some Poles consider going back to Poland (making money in GBP vs PLN won't be as lucrative any more).
TheOther 5 | 3,063    
24 Jun 2016  #78

the British pound value will lose 10-20% within a week

It lost already 5% to the US$.
Szalawa 4 | 254    
24 Jun 2016  #79

What about the fact that the British pound value will lose 10-20% within a week - won't some Poles consider going back to Poland

Might, but there are still many advantages those people obtain. Oh I would not worry about the pound, it still is one of the most highly valued currencies and UK is far from being a poor country

And congratulations to the British, you have something to be proud about! never forget this day
AussiePol    
24 Jun 2016  #80

poleinus.....what do you mean by this statement - "Perhaps Poles will have to make do without some luxuries they have become accustomed to in the last few years"

I do not mean to ask this question with rudeness I just want to know how the money from the EU is being used in Poland?
Atch 12 | 1,754    
24 Jun 2016  #81

Well it looks like old Blighty is out. No need for panic though. It will take years of faffing about and 'talks' for this process to be completed. I do think that the EU is heading into a process of devolution and reformation. It's inevitable because the whole thing has become unwieldy. Big organizations need to move with the changing times, otherwise they tend to go out of business.
dolnoslask 2 | 1,161    
24 Jun 2016  #82

"It will take years of faffing " under EU rules UK must go after two years of negotiation.
Atch 12 | 1,754    
24 Jun 2016  #83

Mmmmm and in theory Poland should have had the Euro by now...........they suit themselves Dolno. Good morning by the way! And Britian will survive this. She's a great old country and the bulldog spirit is still there.
dolnoslask 2 | 1,161    
24 Jun 2016  #84

Morning Atch yes I think Britain will be ok in the long term , sadly I think Poland will have problems because it has not adopted the Euro

Bulldog spirit fore sure, Britain will have many corners to fight now.
Dougpol1 20 | 1,413    
24 Jun 2016  #85

'Morning all. This is an absolute disaster for Britain, and for Europe. Make no mistake about that. Some bloke on the BBC saying that he is proud to be British today.

I am deeply ashamed myself.
mafketis 16 | 4,730    
24 Jun 2016  #86

Perhaps Poles will have to make do without some luxuries they have become accustomed to in the last few years

Is this Polly again? Are you so ashamed of your past posts that you're reduced to sock-puppeting?

And maybe the Polish people will 'make do without some luxuries' when a backbencher MP makes do without free helicopter rides....
dolnoslask 2 | 1,161    
24 Jun 2016  #87

"I am deeply ashamed myself."

Nothing for you to be ashamed about Doug your heart is in the right place
Chemikiem 4 | 894    
24 Jun 2016  #88

This is an absolute disaster for Britain,

Sadly I agree :-(
Thought it would be close but that we we would stay in.
Can't quite believe it.
mafketis 16 | 4,730    
24 Jun 2016  #89

Thought it would be close but that we we would stay in.

I thought that the polls were probably underreporting support for leaving and that the result would be larger for leave.

Hopefully, this will send a message to the EU leadership that business-as-usual needs to change.
Religio    
24 Jun 2016  #90

mafketis - this will send a message to the EU leadership

Initial reactions from the Brussels bureaucracy seem to indicate that the Junckers, Schultzes, Timmermanses, etc. do not fault the bureacratised and ideologised EU but blame Cameron for calling a referendum in the first place. Chances are good that rather than abandoning Brussels' bullying of other countries, they will start pressing for greater federalisation -- the very thing a majoriy of British voters had opposed. That may encourage further exits leading to the eventual breakup of the communtiy.

Unexpected results may include Northern Ireland joining Eire in a GDR style merger. Scotland voted for remain and that may energise the independence movement. The Złoty dropped in value from 3.85 to the USD yesty to 4.03 today.




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