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Amnesty to Illegal immigrants in Poland


Harry
2 Jan 2012  #91
I'm willing to bet that Harry is much more knowledgeable about Polish history and traditions than 99% of Polish-Americans.

Just knowing what the Polish word for grandmother is makes one more knowledgeable about Poland than most 'Polish'-Americans.
Ironside 48 | 9,748
2 Jan 2012  #92
It's good that they don't pay tax to pay for the services that they use?

What services ? They also pay tax, have you ever heard about VAT?
Whatever benefits they are getting it is a pitiful amount !

As for being overpaid - I'm paid what the market thinks I'm worth. Sorry, but the market has no demand for village peasants.

The world is a global village nowadays and there is marketfor new kind of (global)village idiot - PC idiot.

I'm proud of it. We in the Jewish community in Poland know that we have a firm grasp on the levers of power, and we certainly won't let go.

Good. I'm sure that you grasp all levers you can put your hands on. You are hooked on ...power.

I'm willing to bet that Harry is much more knowledgeable about Polish history and traditions than 99% of Polish-Americans.

Too bad that he uses that knowledge for mocking purposes at least on this forum.
Harry
2 Jan 2012  #93
" What services ?"
Don't they send their kids to school? All nine births in private hospitals I assume. And Medicover rather than state health care too of course.
Ironside 48 | 9,748
2 Jan 2012  #94
Yes, precisely you assume all that just because they have nine children. You are prejudiced. They could be doing very well for all we know. Yet you assume they are paupers based on the number of children they have.
Harry
2 Jan 2012  #95
" Yes, precisely you assume all that just because they have nine children. You are prejudiced. They could be doing very well for all we know. Yet you assume they are paupers based on the number of children they have."

They run a little business from their backyard but you claim that they earn enough for nine times private education and fully private health care. That's laughable even by your standards!
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
3 Jan 2012  #96
What services ? They also pay tax, have you ever heard about VAT?
Whatever benefits they are getting it is a pitiful amount !

I doubt they're buying much on the open market, so VAT will be a tiny amount.

You are hooked on ...power.

Correct. I enjoy the fact that I wield considerable power in my job.

Yes, precisely you assume all that just because they have nine children. You are prejudiced. They could be doing very well for all we know. Yet you assume they are paupers based on the number of children they have.

That's because the vast majority of people living in villages in Eastern Poland tend to be exactly as we've described. You don't see wealthy, intelligent people having nine children and running "small businesses" in their backyards. I'd be willing to bet any amount of money that their business isn't registered in Poland.
RevokeNice 15 | 1,859
3 Jan 2012  #97
I doubt they're buying much on the open market, so VAT will be a tiny amount.

Who, the illegals?

Correct. I enjoy the fact that I wield considerable power in my job.

How much money do you make from exploiting third world immigrants?
ShAlEyNsTfOh 4 | 161
3 Jan 2012  #98
Don't they send their kids to school? All nine births in private hospitals I assume

2 of the oldest were pulled out of high school years ago to work for their father.

all births were done at home.

They are, by US standards, VERY, very poor, as the whole town is. It's hardly been touched by modernization since the end of the war. They live in a 165-yr-old wooden/brick house built by my great-great-great-grandparents. They own a HUGE chunk of land around their house, yet never use it.

My mom's brother has never even left the podlasie region. He's 43 years old now.

When my grandma died in '02, I suppose her only son wanted to continue on the old-world 'tradition' of raising a big, harding-working family, like my grandma did (and as a widow). My mom and her 4 sisters all moved abroad.

What I admire greatly about them is that they practice very old-fashioned slavic traditions, and more importantly, give what this country seriously lacks, CHILDREN. :)

Btw, NO native Pole would dare criticize one of their hard-working countrymen and their families!!!
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
3 Jan 2012  #99
2 of the oldest were pulled out of high school years ago to work for their father.

In Poland, where a lack of "matura" almost certainly kills off any chances of ever getting employed - that says everything about the family. Especially nowadays, where the matura is handed out like sweets - no matura, no job. It says a lot about their economic situation if they were willing to pull the kids out of school just to earn a few extra zloty.

And you're actually trusting the opinion of these people? When do they actually visit the big city?

They are, by US standards, VERY, very poor, as the whole town is. It's hardly been touched by modernization since the end of the war. They live in a 165-yr-old wooden/brick house built by my great-great-great-grandparents. They own a HUGE chunk of land around their house, yet never use it.

Very typical for that part of the world. Badly educated, poor peasants who often complain about others but do nothing to improve their own situation.

My mom's brother has never even left the town. He's 43 years old now.

And yet he feels the need to comment on illegal immigrants?

When my grandma died in '02, I suppose her only son wanted to continue on the old-world 'tradition' of raising a big, harding-working family, like my grandma did (and as a widow). My mom and her 4 sisters all moved abroad.

No offence, but it's not hard to see why your mom and her sisters fled abroad. They would have rotted away in such a village.

What I admire greatly about them is that they practice very old-fashioned slavic traditions, and more importantly, give what this country seriously lacks, CHILDREN. :)

We don't actually need more badly educated children who don't leave their village. In fact, such people tend to be a burden on the State, as they use, use, use and take, take, take while contributing next to nothing economically.

Btw, NO native Pole would dare criticize one of their hard-working countrymen and their families!!!

I think it's safe to say that the vast majority of Poles I know would quite happily criticise such "pathological" families. And 100% of them would criticise the decision to take kids out of school just to earn a few extra zloty.

Strange how me and Harry were bang on the money though, eh?
Ironside 48 | 9,748
3 Jan 2012  #100
In Poland, where a lack of "matura" almost certainly kills off any chances of ever getting employed -

As if nowadays that slip of paper would be any help in getting employed. Practical skills or vocational education is more certain way of being employed or better still being self-employed.

We don't actually need more badly educated children who don't leave their village. In fact, such people tend to be a burden on the State, as they use, use, use and take, take, take while contributing next to nothing economically.

Who is we?
If you talking about government and such - I most certainly would agree that Poland doesn't needs those badly educated crooks with no integrity and little skill in the position in which they can harm the country.

No wonder they are desperate to reaming in power as they would have no hope of employment with their limited working experience. Although they would do well in the world oldest trade.

think it's safe to say that the vast majority of Poles I know would quite happily criticise such "pathological" families. And 100% of them would criticise the decision to take kids out of school just to earn a few extra zloty.

I think that your circle of friends is very misleading as to your understanding of Poles. They have indeed mastered dislike of rabble but without ingrained sense of responsibility and concern for such a rabble's well being and elevation.

I think that that selectivity comes from the fact that such people are indeed rabble and peasants themselves although education and money give them resemblance of class and respectability.

I blame soviet occupation the system created countless selectively educated operators.Their present and their influence as well as their offspring are the unfortunate feature of Poland's s landscape.
Harry
3 Jan 2012  #101
As if nowadays that slip of paper would be any help in getting employed.

Nice of you to confirm yet again that you know nothing about the job market in Poland. Next time you're in Poland do feel free to drop by the place where my partner works: there you'll meet lots of people who can tell you precisely how important what you refer to as a slip of paper is, even when one has practical skills.

Strange how me and Harry were bang on the money though, eh?

It's almost like we've actually been to the places which other people bang on and on and on and on about.
love_sunil80 14 | 127
13 Jan 2012  #102
Merged: Amnesty for foreigners (Abolicja dla cudzoziemców )

The amnesty for aliens who are illegally staying in Poland comes into effect on 1 January 2012. Foreigners who want their stay to be legalized will have to submit applications to the competent voivode. Applications may be submitted during a period of six months. Amnesty will be granted for a period of 2 years.

To know more details about eligiblity and procedures please visit the below link
malopolska.uw.gov.pl/default.aspx?page=abolicja_en

Cheers
Sunil


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