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What the Polish government do to bring back home Polish immigrants?


mirabela 1 | -
4 Oct 2007 #1
Somebody can tell me what are the latest measures that the polish government took to bring home the polish immigrants? thank you!
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
4 Oct 2007 #2
A lot of talking but what can they do ? Vast majority of people left because of money.
clunkshift 2 | 82
4 Oct 2007 #3
There is a non-government initiative: “Zostańcie z nami” (Stay with Us), organised by a weekly magazine foundation - Polityka (Fundacja Tygodnika Polityka).
The intention is to provide incentive/bursary/grant awards to attract the brightest job candidates and it is sponsored by major companies that need skilled/educated staff.

I wouldn't know if it works though...
randompal 7 | 306
4 Oct 2007 #4
what are the latest measures that the polish goverment took to bring home the polish imigrants

Bringing home the young batch might be a political disaster, after all they will return with all kinds of subversive anti-Radio Maryja values swimming in their heads...
peterweg 36 | 2,316
4 Oct 2007 #5
Could you explain what you mean?
espana 17 | 911
4 Oct 2007 #6
Radio Maryja

the european union should give more financial support to this nice radio station
Polson 5 | 1,771
4 Oct 2007 #7
I know...O_o
plk123 8 | 4,150
4 Oct 2007 #8
haven't heard a thing.. PL gov sucks when they are needed. thus, i'm not going back.
randompal 7 | 306
4 Oct 2007 #9
PL gov sucks when they are needed. thus, i'm not going back.

too bad, maybe someday you'll change your mind. at least vote, and tell your Polish friends (citizens) to vote too. at least you can say you tried, that's the Truth regarding the true Polish spirit...
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
4 Oct 2007 #10
There is a non-government initiative: “Zostańcie z nami” (Stay with Us), organised by a weekly magazine foundation - Polityka (Fundacja Tygodnika Polityka).

I didn't know It. Maybe because I don't read this commie crap.

The intention is to provide incentive/bursary/grant awards to attract the brightest job candidates

So this is simply stupid. The brightests don't need such things.
plk123 8 | 4,150
4 Oct 2007 #11
So this is simply stupid. The brightests don't need such things.

is it really mr knowitall? think about it some more

(citizens)

i've actually considered dropping mine but completely nomadic i don't feel right now.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
4 Oct 2007 #12
is it really

Yes. I'm not going to offend anyone but people, who leave Poland aren't really the brightest. The brightest can live quite well even in 3rd world countries. They don't need any special support.
plk123 8 | 4,150
4 Oct 2007 #13
look at it in another way. there is at least another reason.

glad you bought into the commie bs and had a grand time.. :)

is it always about need?
Kris 3 | 9
5 Oct 2007 #14
From what I read in the above explanation, the funding is meant to be an incentive to entice people back home. Not support.

Most of the Polish people I know in Dublin are highly intelligent and very well qualified. Maybe if people actually steered for change, rather than voting in the same old typical cronies Poland would have more to offer its people. Namely, quality of life, good economy, and lower rental/accommodation costs.

Every single Polish person I have met are frustrated by the draconian mentality within the Polish government, the corruption, feel unable to question this dubious establishment, and the bigoted outburts from so called leaders. Poland has already been warned it runs the risk of relinquishing its place in the EU by not fully embracing and putting into practice what they signed up for, and in particular, the issue of human rights.

The EC gave its consent to the Europe Agreement with the foreword containing an additional point: "Poland's ultimate aim is membership of the Community." In this way the Polish partner established that the aim of the Agreement was the creation of frameworks for Poland's gradual integration into the Community.

The most important from Poland's point of view was that as a result of diplomatic interventions by the states, of the Visegrád group, the European Council decided at its Copenhagen summit in June 1993 that: "the associate member states from Central and Eastern Europe, if they so wish, will become members of the EU. In order to achieve this, however, they must fulfill the appropriate conditions." These became known as the Copenhagen criteria, or simply, membership criteria.

The Copenhagen criteria laid down the following EU membership requirements:

1. That candidate countries achieve stable institutions that guarantee democracy, legality, human rights and respect for and protection of minorities.
2. That candidate countries have a workingmarket economy, capable of competing effectively on EU markets.
3. That candidate countries are capable of accepting all the membership responsibilities, political, economic and monetary.

It is almost daily that I read how Poland fails in each of these areas. There is a long road ahead for Poland, but one day she will get there. The difference will come down to voting for actual change. Also, I see some mirroring of what happened in Ireland over the last 20 years. One of the poorest in Europe, if not the most, many of the Irish youth emigrated to the US and found a better life. Some had families before they could even afford a first visit home, (it was more expensive than today and a greater distance) but they made a good life for themselves there.

Of those that came back with fresh ideas from the US, Ireland began to change when she adopted the capitalist economic model. Only once we, the people, who employ the government, realised that, and steered for change, did this seed begin to sprout. There needs to be a shift in a national mindset for this. This was borne when people saw that a better life can be made once the chains of an archaic establishment, too comfortable in the past being the victim of the Saxon King, were broken. You have to question and manage a government you pay and elect to work for you.

No longer is Ireland second to the UK, its former oppressor, it is even more prosperous. We had to look outside the box and make that change ourselves. And fully embrace our responsibilities with the EU. Give and take is partnership.

Some people's delicate sensibilities will be bruised for what I'm about to say, but Poland is a very, very proud nation. And rightly so. Poland rose from the ashes like a Phoenix and the people survived the stripping of its lands by its opporessors. Just like Ireland. And just like Ireland, who was comfortbale for some time seeing itself as a victim, Poland is the same. Very proud that it fought for its survival, but also resentment is held that the outsode world stood by and let it happen. This has lead to pride turning to an insular situation, still existing, where outside values or ideas are demonised almost. Quite a closed perception, in a global view. It is evident from many of the sentiments posted here by Poles.

But, you know, Poles who have worked in Ireland, UK, the US, have better lives. They can walk into a tax office and have their query dealt with, professionally and with manners and no abuse, or any civil servant looking down their nose at them. You don't have to bribe anyone to have applications processed in due course. Efficiency and professionalism is a given. They see they can question the establishment, steer for change, change the status quo with perseverence, and adapt new ideas to their own home situation.

It will happen. It will have to if Poland is to be a credible EU partner. But seriously, the leaders Poland has at the moment are a hindrance if nothing else.
wildrover 98 | 4,451
5 Oct 2007 #15
What the Polish government do to bring back home Polish immigrants?

They are trebling the wages and legalising cannabis....
plk123 8 | 4,150
5 Oct 2007 #16
From what I read in the above explanation, the funding is meant to be an incentive to entice people back home. Not support.

ding ding :)
isthatu 3 | 1,164
7 Oct 2007 #17
some fella was on the BBC news last night with a sign Powrot do domu behind him..........
Orzelbialy - | 17
17 Feb 2010 #18
I think anyone that left Poland is a traitor to the nation and shouldn't bother coming back. It's quite embarrassing actually, a whole generation of educated Poles left so that they could do the scumiest, most pathetic jobs of Western Europe and get half the pay too. The Mexicans of Europe.
1jola 14 | 1,879
17 Feb 2010 #19
I think anyone that left Poland is a traitor to the nation...

JPII got a better job in Italy; was he a traitor, genius?
RubasznyRumcajs 5 | 477
17 Feb 2010 #20
's

ubi bene, ibi patria

btw, do you think that doing 'the scumiest, most pathetic job' in west is worse than being unemployed in poland?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Feb 2010 #21
Whiteeagle makes a good point above and is essentially the crux of the matter. Unemployment benefits are nothing like those on offer in the UK so that's a major disincentive. Many go on to do what they call staż. It's sth like work experience and stands them in good stead for later. However, it comes to an end and the job hunting process starts anew. Another stopgap measure!

Tusk is working on 'bigger' plans. After all, what do the people matter? ;) ;) ;) ;)
Orzelbialy - | 17
17 Feb 2010 #22
Yah I still think their traitors and yes I think being unemployed in poland is better than being employed else where. Because when you starve you think, and when you think you change your government, by force if necessary. Unfortunatly most Poles can't think that way, they just waited until it joined the EU and then fled in evrey direction bound to forget their history and national pride and then their own nation loses a whole generation of intellectuals.Maybe traitor is a little harsh but I guess They'd rather work for foreigners than improve their own nation.
Torq 28 | 2,773
17 Feb 2010 #23
What nationality are you, Orzelbialy? How do you know so much about Poles?

You're not Polish, that I know for sure.
Orzelbialy - | 17
17 Feb 2010 #24
I am extremely proud to be Polish.Haha it might seem schizophrenic to speak of Poles in the third person but sometimes it seems I am the only proud one left. I saw your reply to my other post thanks for critiqing my spelling. :p
Torq 28 | 2,773
17 Feb 2010 #25
I saw your reply to my other post thanks for critiqing my spelling. :p

It's not about spelling. Such word as "ojczyznosc" doesn't even exist in Polish
and writing "pienkna" is such an abysmal mistake that not many primary school
pupils would make it.

You sound to me like an American Polonus (a bit of a plastic Pole, no offense).

I am extremely proud to be Polish (...) it seems I am the only proud one left

For someone "extremely proud" to be Polish, your command of the Polish language
is truly appalling. If you really are a Pole then you should consider the fact that
Polish people were persecuted for speaking Polish under partitions and many Poles
were imprisoned or sent to Siberian exile for resisting Germanization or Russification.
They suffered to preserve Polish language, a lot of them died in prisons and exile
so butchering it, like you do, is showing a terrible lack of respect to them and their
struggle.

Remember that it is nasza mowa polska "groźniejsza niż burza i od słowików miększa"
and show some respect to it - maybe start with buying some self-help Polish
language book and using Polish diacritic signs when you write in our language.

After that you can come back here and lecture everyone on patriotism.

OK?
beelzebub - | 444
17 Feb 2010 #26
Torq I have noticed that Polish or those with Polish blood who live abroad are normally the ones who are going on the most on about "Polish pride". It must be some sort of compensation or homesickness.
Torq 28 | 2,773
17 Feb 2010 #27
It must be some sort of compensation or homesickness.

It appears so.
TICKLED PINK
17 Feb 2010 #28
They'd rather work for foreigners than improve their own nation.

Be patriotic and suffer, thats a good philosophy.

I am extremely proud to be Polish

pity youre such a fool !!!!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Feb 2010 #29
Back to the thread, what is the Polish government doing? Surely it must be of some concern when 1/38 of your population goes to one group of countries alone. Alignment is key and a sensible government policy would be to, as best possible, to transfer the skills used abroad into Polish industry and practices. What is Tusk doing or what has he done in this regard?
Orzelbialy - | 17
17 Feb 2010 #30
Its true my Polish is weak, especially in writing and that's only through my fault but not one of you could refute my points. Torq, its quite telling when a "plastic" Pole has to teach about patriotism and whats actually going on in Poland. To quote Roman Dmowski "To be a Pole does not mean just to speak Polish or to feel close to other Poles, but to value the Polish nation above all else ... [A Pole] must accept everything Polish, both good and bad, and must accept every period of the nation's history, both strong and weak." and I value the Polish state above all else, unfortunately millions of other Poles don't. Millions of Poles died so there could be a Poland but you shouldn't be reminding me, you should be reminding the millions of Poles that are leaving every single year and settling down in different nations and enhancing them. Those Poles died so that there could be a free Poland and they went through 200 years of oppression, they did not intend for the free people of Poland to then abandon their great nation. So sure nitpick at my Polish but unlike alot of Poles I still have a shred of dignity and if loving the state makes me a fool then I am the biggest fool in the world.


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