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Scottish & Polish relationships


szkotja2007 27 | 1,499
1 Apr 2010 #181
Witamy w Szkocji - a wee message from Scotlands Government and its First Minister, Alex Salmond.I dont believe there is a London government version of this or anything of its type.

szkocja.eu/sitppolish/58.html

One example of how Scotland promotes stronger links with Poland.

I dont think this has been posted before- its a website for Poles living in Glasgow.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
3 Apr 2010 #182
I dont think this has been posted before- its a website for Poles living in Glasgow.

Thanks! I'm in Glasgow at the moment before I head up to the highlands and islands next week :)
slavianka87 - | 2
15 Jun 2010 #183
To Seanus:
Do you have any single bro? I have always wanted to have a cute ginger baby :DDD lol ;-)
poland_
15 Jun 2010 #184
From as far back as the mid 15th century there were Scots trading and settling in Poland. A Scot's Pedlar Pack in Poland, which became a proverbial expression, usually consisted of cloths, woollen goods and linen handkerchiefs. Itinerants also sold tin and ironware such as scissors and knives. Along with the protection offered by King Stephen in the Royal Grant of 1576 a district in Krakow was assigned to Scots immigrants.

Records from 1592 reveal Scots settlers being granted citizenship of Krakow giving their employment as trader or merchant. Payment for being granted citizenship ranged from 12 Polish florins to a musket and gunpowder or an undertaking to marry within a year and a day of acquiring a holding.

By the 1600s there were an estimated 30,000 Scots living in Poland. Many came from Dundee and Aberdeen and could be found in Polish towns from Krakow to Lublin. Settlers from Aberdeenshire were mainly Episcopalians or Catholics, but there were also large numbers of Calvinists. As well as Scottish traders, there were also many Scottish soldiers in Poland. In 1656 a number of Scottish Highlanders who were disenchanted with Oliver Cromwell's rule went to Poland in the service of the King of Sweden.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
15 Jun 2010 #185
Poles and Scotts can do bussines. I can imagine new free Scottland as part of future Slavic Confederation. Poland should offer protection to Scottland from English oppresores

When a lot of the Scots came to Poland there was actually a Scottish king in London, trying to forge the notion of "Great Britain".

There were also a number of English in Poland but that's a bit less romantic.

Is Trevek Scottish?

It depends who he's talking to (and who you ask).

Dad's family are/were Scots (my brother was born in Dumbarton) and my Mum's are Tynesiders (a bit further back, Cornish and Irish). I was, however, born and brought up in England (although my Scottish granny lived just around the corner).

Take your pick.
Matowy - | 295
15 Jun 2010 #186
Poles and Scotts can do bussines. I can imagine new free Scottland as part of future Slavic Confederation. Poland should offer protection to Scottland from English oppresores

Haha, beautiful. I couldn't come up with this kind of comedy if I tried.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #187
Poles and Scots are really pretty close, almost cut from the same cloth. Needless to say, much depends on character but if the will is there then there shouldn't be any problems.
MediaWatch 10 | 945
15 Jun 2010 #188
I heard the actor Collin Farrell say that he is Irish and Scottish.

His wife Alicja is Polish.

They both star in his next movie ONDINE

His wife Alicja talks about Collin and the movie.

youtube.com/watch?v=mtZxH5QKNcY
Trevek 26 | 1,702
15 Jun 2010 #189
They both star in his next movie ONDINE

Ondines and Selkies are also part of Scottish mythology. Selkies are believed to have been Saami kayakers from Scandinavia, so that would make her part Scandinavian too!
MediaWatch 10 | 945
15 Jun 2010 #190
To be honest with you I don't know too much about these types of things, so what you say about Ondines and Selkies being part of Scottish and even Scandinavian mythology/culture sounds quite interesting. I just started to become interested in these things since the Ondine movie I heard was coming out.

Seanus seems to be knowledgeable about this part of Europe, so I wonder what Seanus has to say about these things?
Trevek 26 | 1,702
15 Jun 2010 #191
There's actually a difference between the two things. Ondines are often portrayed as wraiths, or nasty little water spirits/sprites which might have a nice time drowning you (kelpies). Selkies are seals who shed their skins and become people. They can't go back to the sea without their skins. The fishermen could claim a selkie bride by stealing her skin and making her live with him (I did a puppet show about this in Warsaw a few years ago).

There is a theory that there was a large migration of saami (Laplanders) to the outer islands on Scotland (many of which had been under Norwegian rule for centuries). The kayaks were made of skin and often submerged below the water level, making the kayaker look like a seal. The kayaker might come ashore and take of the skins. If they were stolen they couldn't go back to the sea (too cold and the skin may have acted as a spray deck).

Interesting as the theory is, it is flawed because everyone knows Selkies are real anyway.

I think Seanus is from Aberdeen area. They have a similar thing with sheep which shed their fleeces and become beautiful girls. When they put the skin back on they become sheep again... "and so concludes the case for the defence, my lord!"
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #192
@Slavianka, unfortunately not! My bro's wife gave birth a year ago and wee Matthew is the cutest little thing. I've seen him once and he is beyond adorable. He has flame red hair and I have some photos of him :) :)

@MW, we have definite Nordic connections and some of our folklore stems from there. However, as Trevek hinted, I was born on the wrong coast. I am from the east coast and most of the tales come from the west coast. Ondine was an eye-opener for me too.

@Trevek, it goes a little sth like that, yes. It's quite drab on the east coast. Too industrial and grey.

As for the thread, many Scots seem to have plumped for Polish women. Quite a good choice if you have the right tools to handle them :) (I mean approach/skills).
southern 75 | 7,096
15 Jun 2010 #193
Everyone's dream is a Slovianka.With this name I imagine a red high cheeks blonde girl quite busty living in farm getting milk from the cow.

for Polish women. Quite a good choice if you have the right tools to handle them

The tools are located more south than Scotland.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #194
You refer to the English as 'the tools'? Expect to come in for heavy criticism ;) ;)

Southern, I think many Polish girls see past the Balkan bravado ;) ;)
southern 75 | 7,096
15 Jun 2010 #195
You refer to the English as 'the tools'?

Not exactly.

many Polish girls see past the Balkan bravado ;) ;)

Sometimes only sometimes for some moments we get along with polish girls.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #196
I think many relationships struggle due to the language barrier. Fiery tempers are another one that could destroy a relationship.
southern 75 | 7,096
15 Jun 2010 #197
struggle due to the language barrier

Sometimes the language barrier is good because the girl does not understand what exactly you are saying and supposes you say the right thing.

Fiery tempers

Yes,we are temperamentful and so are Polki.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #198
The language barrier works 2 ways, you are right. Sometimes they find another language cute and your mistakes even cuter.

The battle of temperaments :)
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
15 Jun 2010 #199
I think Seanus is from Aberdeen area. They have a similar thing with sheep which shed their fleeces and become beautiful girls. When they put the skin back on they become sheep again... "and so concludes the case for the defence, my lord!"

PMSL.
(that was actually really really funny!)

Poles and Scots are really pretty close, almost cut from the same cloth.

In what way? You could say Poles and Pakis are cut from the same cloth, both cant wait to get out of their respective countries and both a penchant for opening corner shops..
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #200
I think in temperament and, to some extent, by history. Both are rugged in the main and proud in the same way.
time means 5 | 1,310
15 Jun 2010 #201
I think in temperament and, to some extent, by history

How so?

You could say Poles and Pakis are cut from the same cloth, both cant wait to get out of their respective countries and both a penchant for opening corner shops..

Lol.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #202
I think you could call it the minority complex and always fighting against sth.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
15 Jun 2010 #203
I think in temperament and, to some extent, by history. Both are rugged in the main and proud in the same way.

Could say the Welsh are the same then...
time means 5 | 1,310
15 Jun 2010 #204
minority complex and always fighting against sth.

The Celtic minority? Most lowland jocks aren't Celts anyway more likely Anglo-Norman.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #205
Well, they still fight, as do the Welsh. However, perception swings in roundabouts. Brits have very mixed perceptions I've noticed.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
15 Jun 2010 #206
PMSL.
(that was actually really really funny!)

Glad ewe liked it.

Most lowland jocks aren't Celts anyway more likely Anglo-Norman.

A bit like a lot of Irish.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #207
I'll have to ram you off this thread, Trevek ;)
Trevek 26 | 1,702
15 Jun 2010 #208
Trev fleece in terror!
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
15 Jun 2010 #209
Well, they still fight, as do the Welsh. However, perception swings in roundabouts. Brits have very mixed perceptions I've noticed.

You're not making sense Sheep, The Welsh are Brits same the Scots same as the English, whether we like it or not..we are all lumped under that one nasty name along with the rest of them that get their passports..

Glad ewe liked it.

You're on fire today..keepem coming :D
Seanus 15 | 19,706
15 Jun 2010 #210
I know the Welsh are Brits. Where did I say otherwise?

Anyway, I generally enjoy my relationship but women love to jibber away. That's quite draining!


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