The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 68

Some Poles have fine houses


Varsovian 92 | 634
6 May 2010  #1
I must admit that my not unusual, family-size house just outside Warsaw is bigger than that of most people I know in England, though not all. But in England they need substantially more money than I have to achieve that.

In my wife's farming village in the back of beyond all the new houses (post 1990) are large. Brits come here hoping to find misery, yet find luxury - they want to be better than someone, rather like "pow-white trash" in the Deep South.

One of my friends here seriously outdoes me though.

Have a look: janowekdwor.pl

I'll be going for a garden party there next month - looking forward to it!
Wroclaw Boy
6 May 2010  #2
Houses are generally bigger and the flats infinetly smaller.

When i first came here i advised everybody i knew to buy two bed (three room) apartments of 65m2 and above - preferably 80m2, how wrong could i have been. They dont sell or rent no where near as well as the little 35m2 jobbies.
1jola 14 | 1,879
6 May 2010  #3
Large and fine houses are for the nouveu rich, who in general must show their wealth. The concept of a charming cottage is as alien to them as tasteful jewelry or elegant clothing.
dnz 17 | 710
6 May 2010  #4
Didn't you buy a f*cking massive palace WB? Thats awesome :)

I find most houses in Poland are just badly layed out. Also the concept of having a living room (one that you don't sleep in) and a dining room are almost unheard of. and what is it with Polish kitchens? they seem to comprise of random bits of furniture which has been rescued from skips.

I have been in some truly awesome flats in the old inner city building of Poznan, If only people looked after them they would actually be amazing.
OP Varsovian 92 | 634
6 May 2010  #5
I love the Polish village tradition of having a bed in the kitchen. We often congregate there as a family and watch while the women cook. Cosy. Also a convenient place to lay your head when you've hit the vodka and can't make it upstairs.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
6 May 2010  #6
Just come on up to Olsztyn, the building craze is going nuts up here. One day there's a field, a month later there's a housing estate.
anton888 - | 82
6 May 2010  #7
Polish village tradition of having a bed in the kitchen

Is it true? It don't smell?

the concept of having a living room (one that you don't sleep in) and a dining room are almost unheard of

I am really confused, unheard of? Honestly I yet live in anywhere without them.

Around where I live, last couple of years built at least 60 houses, in 3 different projects.
dnz 17 | 710
6 May 2010  #8
I love the Polish village tradition of having a bed in the kitchen.

What they really do that? Thats disgusting.
OP Varsovian 92 | 634
6 May 2010  #9
All older village houses have a daytime bed/layabout sofa in the kitchen.

They mostly have a large reception room doubling as a dining/sitting room. Essentially it has to be large enough to host the first circle of the extended family - say 20 people - for Christmas/Easter/traditional Sunday **** up and natter.

They will have a sofa bed in the living room, but only for occasional use. Only the poor city dwellers would sleep there regularly though.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
6 May 2010  #10
There's also the village houses with the big tiled stoves in the kitchen which can be used for keeping food warm or for sleeping on.
dnz 17 | 710
6 May 2010  #11
Can't beat a good old British Rayburn/Aga IMO
1jola 14 | 1,879
6 May 2010  #12
What they really do that? Thats disgusting.

Not do, did. V is talking about old country homes. If you had ever lived in a house before central heating in a cold climate as Poland use to be, you would know why your bed was as near as the stove as practicaly possible.

I can see you also have never seen a modern studio apartment either.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
6 May 2010  #13
Can't beat a good old British Rayburn/Aga IMO

Yep. I have a friend called Agnieszka, and when she called herself Aga, she wondered why I laughed. Wonder what she'd have said if I called her an old boiler.
OP Varsovian 92 | 634
6 May 2010  #14
Aga as a girl is pronounced "Agger"
Wroclaw Boy
6 May 2010  #15
Didn't you buy a f*cking massive palace WB? Thats awesome :)

I wasnt going to mention it but:

I did, I bought two houses, the first was a Polish PaƂace which im sat in right now and is obscenely huge with loads of land around 20 hectares and the second was a town house investment property in Wroclaw.

I couldnt dream of such properties in the UK. Even when i rented my first apartment here back in early 2006, my friends that came over where astonished at the amount of living space.

Everything comes into perspective when you take the Stansted express from Stansted airport to central London as to how small houses are in the UK.

Poland: 1 England: 0
puella 4 | 172
21 Jan 2011  #16
a living room (one that you don't sleep in) and a dining room are almost unheard of.

not true.

Living room in polish is called salon. I have salon in my home.
JaneDoe 5 | 114
21 Jan 2011  #17
family-size house just outside Warsaw is bigger than that of most people I know in England

I find English houses to be small, old and outated. Just like old-school houses in Poland, but still a bit bigger. :)

Have a look:

You don't think that every Pole owns a house looking like that, right? :)
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
21 Jan 2011  #18
You dont think that every english person lives in a house like that do you ? :)
But lol,it does make me laugh when I see houses down south that are going for close on £1million,around here those pokey terrece houses and didy little flats would be social housing or bedsits full of immigrants and students :)
JaneDoe 5 | 114
21 Jan 2011  #19
You dont think that every english person lives in a house like that do you ? :)

No, I don't. :) And I have never been in England! LOL! But that's what I see on tv. You guys gotta do something about that image. :)
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
21 Jan 2011  #20
Dont worry, I was scared you'd somehow seen my house :)
Yeah,the image,I'll tell them to stop filming in all those picturesque locations ,medievil villages and stuff like that,focus more on new build estates and footballers vulgar mansions instead :)

But that's what I see on tv.

lol,dont tell me,Eastenders on BBC prime? :)
BTW, I do agree,if you mean the sort of houses you see in London,they are a joke,if my house was in London it would be "worth" easily 6 or 7 times as much ....
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
21 Jan 2011  #21
Some Poles have fine houses

No sh*t what'd you think Poles live in clay huts? Many people in the country have large well made houses, most were build after 1980, only really poor people got those one level 2 bedroom houses.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,625
21 Jan 2011  #22
Many people in the country have large well made houses

Well made?

I beg to differ - many of them are thrown up and built from cheap materials. The vast majority of post-1990 residential construction has been of appalling quality.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
21 Jan 2011  #23
Well made?

Well I wasnt going to bring up those breeze block monstrosities I saw being thrown up between Krakow/Zakopane a few years back......
grubas 12 | 1,391
21 Jan 2011  #24
Well made?

Yea well made indeed.In comparison with American houses built with 2x4's and plywood Polish houses are freaking bunkers.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
21 Jan 2011  #25
Well made?

a brick or cinder block house, with tile or metal roofing is well made unless the builder f'ed it up. Compare to American wood framing, vinyl siding, and shingle roofing it's 5x better. Building products are so expensive here only rich can build a house like that.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
21 Jan 2011  #26
Maybe the three little pigs is a purely european childrens tale eh?
JaneDoe 5 | 114
21 Jan 2011  #27
American houses built with 2x4's and plywood

Amazing how many heavy pictures the wall can hold, tough. ;)
puella 4 | 172
21 Jan 2011  #28
The vast majority of post-1990 residential construction has been of appalling quality.

What does it mean? I think they are 100% fine. A brick is a brick.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708
21 Jan 2011  #29
A brick is a brick.

True enough,but it only counts as to how they are put together.
George8600 10 | 637
21 Jan 2011  #30
I prefer Polish housing over English simply because of the nature. I would love to have a nice old large villa in some Polish farm/forest or in their mountains right dab in the middle of the famous European nature. Either there or Bavaria, French valleys, or Swiss alps. My family owns property in Italy and Greece but it's too damn crammed everywhere in Italy and Greece is too hot and I don't like the whole beach culture there. Also I don't understand all the modern day minimalist modernist crap in the cities where people pay tons of money for. Here in Chicago you could pay tons more for a small apartment with some over rated view in a crammed populated area than you would for a super-mansion in winnetka (the rich suburb of illinois).


Home / Life / Some Poles have fine houses
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.