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"Whiskification" of Poland?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
1 Apr 2011 #1
One gets the impression that something which might be called the ‘whiskification of Poland’ (sorry for the neologism!) has been taking place since the iron curtain fell. The top shelf of the average Polish off-licence, bar, pub or café not so long ago was dominated by Hennessy, Courvoisier, Rémy Martin, Martell, etc. Now it is largely Johnny Walker, White Horse, Haig, Black & White, Jack Daniels, etc. Are whiskeys indeed edging out cognacs ad brandies as the Polish connoisseur’s choice? Does this reflect the expansionism of Anglo-Saxon as opposed to Gallic culture? Are there economic reasons for this?
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Apr 2011 #2
It's always been vodka. Still is.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498
1 Apr 2011 #3
Johnny Walker, White Horse, Haig, Black & White - All produced in Scotland, definately not Anglo - Saxon.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Apr 2011 #4
definately not Anglo - Saxon.

Pretty much the same. A Martian wouldn't see a difference and anyone who would get worked up about it should find a nice hobby instead.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498
1 Apr 2011 #5
So you drunk any good Anglo Saxon whisky lately ? LOL
Bzibzioh
1 Apr 2011 #6
Nothing wrong with some Glenmorangie in my coffee.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Apr 2011 #7
drunk any good Anglo Saxon whisky lately?

No. I only drink whisky from the northern parts of the UK. And sometimes Polish whiskey.

But Poles in general prefer vodka. Alcohol shops in Poland sell far more vodka than all the other spirits put together.
isthatu2 4 | 2,702
1 Apr 2011 #8
The "posh" booze shops in Warsaw made a big thing about the sort of Whisky/ey thats no big deal over here so maybe there is a groundswell. When I asked what I could bring as a thank you pressie to the man of the house of a family I stayed with it was Whisky as it was back in 04 anyway still stupidly expensive in Poland .
Cardno85 31 | 976
1 Apr 2011 #9
I think the expense is why bars are displaying it up on the top shelf. Makes the place look a bit posher. However, in the places I have worked, single malts don't seem to do so well. Maybe sell one shot every few months. But then, when you compare 7-10zł for a shot of vodka (or another house spirit) to 30-40zł for a shot of single malt...it's just far too overpriced. The gap is too big and it's really just show-offs who would buy it.
f stop 25 | 2,513
1 Apr 2011 #10
I think the expense is why bars are displaying it up on the top shelf. Makes the place look a bit posher.

For practical reasons too, so the bartender remembers to charge premium.
Cardno85 31 | 976
1 Apr 2011 #11
so the bartender remembers to charge premium.

They sure will remember after they've had to climb up some shelves to get it!
Trevek 26 | 1,702
1 Apr 2011 #12
I think that it shows people realise the world of whisky/whiskey doesn't just end with Johnnie Walker and Balantynes. It's like UK finding out there are other brands of vodka than Smirnoff.

I get paid to do whisky tasting presentations and people are genuinely interested in sampling different types. I don't see it any different to the spread of wines from around the world.

The thing is that you can get such a selection in places like Real and tesco, it is surprising. I had a sudden urge for Bourbon (I usually drink Scotch) and popped into Real. I was surprised to find they not only had the ever-popular Jim Beam, but also some rather pricey Bourbons, not much different in price to a good single malt.
Daisy 3 | 1,225
1 Apr 2011 #13
Pretty much the same. A Martian wouldn't see a difference and anyone who would get worked up about it should find a nice hobby instead.

pretty much not the same at all
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Apr 2011 #14
I'm half Scots half English, and I've honestly never felt there's much difference. Much less so than the North South divide.
Daisy 3 | 1,225
1 Apr 2011 #15
I'm half Scots half English, and I've honestly never felt there's much difference.

how can there be no difference when there's no such thing as English whisky? Only Scots and Irish make whisky, it's just not an English thing
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Apr 2011 #16
English whisky

What? Regardless whichever part of the UK it comes from, it's still a traditional British drink.

Only Scots and Irish make whisky

And Japanese, Canadians, Americans, Poles, Indians..
Daisy 3 | 1,225
1 Apr 2011 #17
And Japanese, Canadians, Americans, Poles, Indians..

All copies of something that originated in Scotland and Ireland

it's still a traditional British drink.

It's not Anglo Saxon though is it?
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Apr 2011 #18
All copies of something that originated in Scotland and Ireland

Which once covered a rather larger area than they do now, and the largest of the two whisky producing regions you mention is most definitely in Britain.

It's not Anglo Saxon though is it?

I'm not sure if we know what the Anglo Saxons drank. What we do know is that they haven't existed for many centuries.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
1 Apr 2011 #19
But Poles in general prefer vodka

Vodka is the best straight or mixed in drinks. Those whiskeys or cognacs smell like perfume to me.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
1 Apr 2011 #20
Vodka is the best straight or mixed in drinks.

I'm a vodka drinker myself - straight, the east European way rather than with a mixer. A civilised way to get drunk.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
1 Apr 2011 #21
Indeed, ethnically Anglo-saxon in referencet o whisky was imrpecise to say the least. I should have referred to Celtic or British Isles culture. But the point which no-one has addressed is why cognac has been eclipsed or sidetracked. I find it a far more 'szlachetny' tipple than any scotch which has that unpleasant 'krople żołądkowe' after-taste.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
1 Apr 2011 #22
Nothing wrong with some Glenmorangie in my coffee.

I love a tip in my top too :)

Did you know that in Ireland we don't call them "Irish coffees" but just coffee? :D

Johnny Walker, White Horse, Haig, Black & White, Jack Daniels,

I like whiskey and don't drink any of the aforementioned, least of all jack D because it comes from a dry state.
These days Jamesons and the Famous Grouse (you get free glasses with them:) dance on my palate... where did I... oh here it is :)

Polonius3, you will probably be delighted to know that due to the Polish vodka shooting culture, it is difficult to get people here to sip, yes sip and enjoy a whiskey, instead it's WHAM! down the hatch in one shot.

I have seen 12 years go in a split second without hitting any taste buds on it's final journey.
what a damn waste.... :)

which has that unpleasant 'krople żołądkowe' after-taste.

Part of the problem here (in Poland) is that whiskey is expensive, so people buy the cheapest (which is still expensive) shoot it down and are left unimpressed for obvious reasons e.g. bad hangover.

Get someone who like whiskey to introduce you to it and you'll be on the pig's back :)

What? Regardless whichever part of the UK it comes from, it's still a traditional British drink.

The word Whiskey comes from Gaelic "uisce beatha" literally translates to "water of life".
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
1 Apr 2011 #23
Famous Grouse

That's what the homeless folk in Scotland drink :D
I always wondered why Bells or Famous grouse was sooooo expensive in Poland when its the cheapest whisky you can buy in Scotland. Though I can say I've never turned down a drink. ;)

People should be happy something like Buckfast hasn't managed to cross the water from the UK!!!

"uisce beatha"

Stop speaking Irish, it's obviously uisge beatha!!!!!!! hehehehe :)
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
1 Apr 2011 #24
That's what the homeless folk in Scotland drink :D

Then they have fine taste!
I think I read somewhere that it is the most popular scotch in the world or most drunk... maybe I just fell for the advert?

Drinking it now as a matter of fact, fine shtuff.

People should be happy something like Buckfast hasn't managed to cross the water from the UK!!!

Ah auld Bucky, made by monks innit?
Used to always be pulled out at the end of a drinking party when I was a younger lad.

P.S. I just gotta use neologisms to annoy P3 :)

uisge beatha

I'd love to hear the way you pronounce that :)
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
1 Apr 2011 #25
Ah auld Bucky, made by monks innit?

Aye, bi ye cannae beet a bo'le ae MD 20/20 tae tap the nicht aff wae :)

A um si'in ere wae a pure minted bo'le af Talisker. Un a must bleet thi its goin doon braw man!

I'd love to hear the way you pronounce that :)

I'm guessing the exact same way the Irish do :)
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
1 Apr 2011 #26
Aye, bi ye cannae beet a bo'le ae MD 20/20 tae tap the nicht aff wae :)

The worst whisky I have ever drank from Scotland was VAT69.

sdafasdf

When I was at University it was 10 Euros for a litre with two litre of coke for FREE (just to prove how bad it is).

Half a glass and you've a hangover custom designed by satan herself.
Even the thought of it brings back traumatic memories...

I'm guessing the exact same way the Irish do :)

drunk?
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
1 Apr 2011 #27
drunk?

Aye! ;)

Even the thought of it brings back traumatic memories...

Seriously, I've never seen anything like that :/
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
1 Apr 2011 #28
Maybe youz are smart enough to export it because apparently even the homeless folk in Scotland drink better :)
nott 3 | 594
1 Apr 2011 #29
Aye, bi ye cannae beet a bo'le ae MD 20/20 tae tap the nicht aff wae :)

Gee, I almost understand more than half of it. Just like Wee Free Men... Just like I were i lil' tiny bit drunk, and I knew that were I sober it would be as clear as a clear sky on Sunday afternoon...
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
1 Apr 2011 #30
Aye, bi ye cannae beet a bo'le ae MD 20/20 tae tap the nicht aff wae

Do they really drink Mad Dog 20/20 in Scotland? What about Thunderbird?


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