The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 22

What type of gift should i buy for my hosts in Poland?


boj
21 Jul 2014  #1
Hello.
I'm traveling to Poland this week with a friend and will be staying at her place for a week.
I need ideas for any gift for the family. Of course not something very expensive.. Or something nice for the woman of the house, that would be the mother and grandmother.

I've already thought of offering dinner outside on the weekend.. But still have to take something with me..

Also let me know if there's anything else i should be aware of as i want to leave a good impression. Thanks 😊
jon357 63 | 14,124
21 Jul 2014  #2
Where are you from? Why not bring a gift typical of your home country?
OP boj
21 Jul 2014  #3
Well I'm not going from my home country.. I'm already going around in Europe. It's gonna be difficult to find something from my place
jump_bunny 5 | 237
21 Jul 2014  #4
in that case bring something typical of the place you've just visited.
OP boj
21 Jul 2014  #5
That could be done. I'm in Italy now and there are lots of things that i can take to eat or drink... But in case in not able to carry that stuff due to flight rules etc.. Recommend me something that i could get in Poland before getting to their place
jon357 63 | 14,124
21 Jul 2014  #6
Those Italian Amarone biscuits are nice and no problem in luggage (plus every airport there should sell them so you can pick some up after the barrier).

Don't, whatever you do, take alcohol.
Roger5 1 | 1,458
21 Jul 2014  #7
Don't, whatever you do, take alcohol.

Why do you advise against that so strongly, Jon?
jon357 63 | 14,124
21 Jul 2014  #8
It just doesn't seem polite and I've heard people advise against it before in PL.

Unless it's very expensive whisky for example, which may well not be what his friend's granny would appreciate :-)
Roger5 1 | 1,458
21 Jul 2014  #9
It just doesn't seem polite and I've heard people advise against it before in PL.

Rude people coming from Italy with a bottle of Galliano are always welcome at my place. I haven't had a Harvey Wallbanger for ages.

You're probably right, though. Not everyone drinks. It's better to bring something that everyone can enjoy.
maraz - | 6
21 Jul 2014  #10
Well in my family we very often get alcohol as gifts from guests and nobody ever thought it's weird or in bad taste, especially wine. So either we are strange or it's a regional thing. But I agree some Italian sweets would be a safer choice, maybe they don't drink
jon357 63 | 14,124
21 Jul 2014  #11
I think unless he knows them well, he should be careful with drink. I'd certainly appreciate it, but I know others that wouldn't. There are also those panettone cakes that come nicely wrapped that might be ok.
jump_bunny 5 | 237
21 Jul 2014  #12
I never knew this was impolite to give alcohol in Poland but I must admit that in case you don't know your hosts very well it's safer to get them chocolates. You don't want to give wine to someone and then find out they're recovering alcoholics.
OP boj
21 Jul 2014  #13
Thanks for ask the suggestions. I can't carry drinks because my luggage limitations don't allow me to.
Sweets should be good. There's a special kind of chocolate from where I'm leaving and then panettone is also a good idea.

Any other general suggestions.. Anything that could be considered rude in their culture?? Or other ways of returning the favor for having me over.. Want to leave a good impression. Once again thanks alot everyone
jon357 63 | 14,124
21 Jul 2014  #14
Take your shoes off when you go into they're home. Continue to take them off even if they say there's no need when you've got them half off. Greet and shake the hand of the ladies before the men (and of course stand when a lady enters the room). And never, ever, shake hands across the threshold of a door; it's considered bad luck and people don't generally do it in PL.
Roger5 1 | 1,458
21 Jul 2014  #15
Greet and shake the hand of the ladies before the men

But wait until a lady offers her hand first (if you are a man).

Continue to take them off even if they say there's no need when you've got them half off.

Yes. They always say, "Oh, don't bother," but it's just part of the ritual. Take them off, whatever they say.

never, ever, shake hands across the threshold

A student of mine recently denied being at all superstitious, but when I suggested he shake hands across the threshold he said, "OK, you got me there".

This superstition runs deep and should be remembered.
If they open a bottle, pace yourself. There's no disgrace in drinking only half a shot when the more macho guests knock back the whole glass. Stay sober. The women will not look kindly on a guest who has to be poured into bed.
maraz - | 6
21 Jul 2014  #16
Yes, it's true with the handshake that the woman has to reach her hand first. I wouldn't mind, but e.g. my mother would probably notice. With the shoes... if you want to be super polite then take them off, but if they say you don't have to then you really don't have to. Come on, imagine a woman coming in high heels and being asked to take them off. It's not like in Japan ;)

I don't know that much about superstitions but I was taught that it's considered not so polite to hold someone in the doorway and not immediately let them in. So maybe that's why we are usually unwilling to greet in the doorway.

Of course you should remember about always letting women though the door. It is considered a norm and it would definitely be noticed if you didn't do that. I always notice that in foreign movies, because it just looks strange to me to see a man walking in first.
JurekBenelli - | 10
22 Jul 2014  #17
Has anyone indicated that a nice bunch of flowers would be ideal gift for a host woman and a nice drop of wine for the rest of the household members.Another option for tasty treat would be a box of chocolates or "Ptasie Mleczko" a product from famous Wedel in Warsaw.

Cheers
Jerzy
jon357 63 | 14,124
22 Jul 2014  #18
I thought of flowers right away, however since he's coming from abroad it would be nicer to bring something with him. And Ptasie Mleko are the same. Plus they're cheap and.nasty, synthetic and not actually very nice.
Roger5 1 | 1,458
22 Jul 2014  #19
cheap and.nasty, synthetic and not actually very nice.

Absolutely horrible, unlike plums in chocolate from Solidarność (Solidarność Śliwka Nałęczowska). The perfect Polish gift.
pam
22 Jul 2014  #20
I agree, they're lovely.
Most of the chocolates by Wawel are pretty good too and would equally make a nice gift.
sobieski 107 | 2,128
22 Jul 2014  #21
And Ptasie Mleko are the same. Plus they're cheap and.nasty, synthetic and not actually very nice.

Actually my parents back home in Belgium like them. As a rule i don't take chocolate back home, that would be the same as taking ice to Greenland :).

But I indulge in their taste :)
jon357 63 | 14,124
22 Jul 2014  #22
I don't mind them every now and again, however since every petrol station and corner shop has hundreds of boxes of them for a few pence each it wouldn't make a great gift - a bit like going to the UK from a foreign country and giving a gift of a bag of Mars Bars.

plums in chocolate from Solidarność (Solidarność Śliwka Nałęczowska). The perfect Polish gift

Delicious! But again, a bit close to home, especially since the OP is flying in from another country.


Home / Life / What type of gift should i buy for my hosts in Poland?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.