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sweet words to use in Poland with shopkeepers


local_fela 17 | 172
5 Jan 2013  #1
Happy new year to all! I wanted to know about some sweet wordies to use in the shops around with some local people.

What I mean is that, all the places in UK, you will find shopkeepers being friendly- like: 'hello mate', 'hello honey', 'good morning sweetheart', 'morning local fella', or something like this to be used around the town....

I have seen it that Poles accept only Polish jokes as of now because of there historical thing which comes out first when they say why ain't so much developed but to be honest they ain't a muslim country or whatsoever not to take such a warm welcoming 'hello' from a customer! no one is going to to 'fist a nanny in her vag'! it's just out of politeness! I don't know much Polish! But just you know try to be nice to some grannies who sell me out me fags and some other things on a daily basis!

bottom line: let me know some cute nice polish sentence i can say in a shop to make the shopkeeper feel easy- pecially if uve lived in britain for a while u would know what i mean! Ain't British btw!

cheers!
zetigrek
5 Jan 2013  #2
bottom line: let me know some cute nice polish sentence i can say in a shop to make the shopkeeper feel easy- pecially if uve lived in britain for a while u would know what i mean!

They are there to work not to chat with the customers.

But just you know try to be nice to some grannies who sell me out me fags and some other things on a daily basis!

Maybe stop to be nice if they are not nice to you.

I have seen it that Poles accept only Polish jokes as of now because of there historical thing which comes out first when they say why ain't so much developed but to be honest they ain't a muslim country or whatsoever

What does it has to do with "sweet words to use with shopkeepers"? With such an aproach you won't make many friends.

In shop you are not expected to chat with shopkeepers. They are in work, you're strangers to each other, and you are supposed to be served quickly at the till to make other people wait less.

What you can say is simple "dzień dobry/dobry wieczór" when you apprach the cash desk (not "hello"), say "proszę" when you pass the money, and say "dziękuję" when you are given a change or... a hamburger (in bars). That's all. If the shop is small then you say "dzień dobry" when you enter it and "do widzenia' when you leave it. They don't have to answer you if they are busy.
sadas 1 | 2
5 Jan 2013  #3
They are there to work not to chat with the customers.

Chill ,the OP just wants to have a nice (and short) chat with the shopkeeper. They are all humans and not robots. For the love of god stop be so Polish :)
1jola 14 | 1,879
5 Jan 2013  #4
This should work: Paczkę fajeczek, droga Pani, i zapałeczki.
OP local_fela 17 | 172
5 Jan 2013  #5
With such an aproach you won't make many friends.

i am not there to make 'friends' and I just want to know that because, i see them everyday and they are like my grandmum's age!!

They are in work, you're strangers to each other, and you are supposed to be served quickly at the till to make other people wait less.

Sorry, no disrespect to anyone- but that sounds like 'customer services' in Poland is NIL, pecially customers you see on a daily basis!
I am not there neither to flirt nor to make friends- ohh come on why you think with a close mind....

For the love of god stop be so Polish :)

Paczkę fajeczek, droga Pani, i zapałeczki.

thank you guys! ;)
gumishu 11 | 5,012
5 Jan 2013  #6
This should work: Paczkę fajeczek, droga Pani, i zapałeczki.

similarly you can add Pani Kochaniutka. but only with a woman - for males Panie kochany
zetigrek
5 Jan 2013  #7
I am not there neither to flirt nor to make friends- ohh come on why you think with a close mind....

Are you saying I'm closed mineded? Do you offend people on daily basis?

Sorry, no disrespect to anyone- but that sounds like 'customer services' in Poland is NIL, pecially customers you see on a daily basis!

As a customer I can tell that I don't like when shopkeepers chat with customers next to me, as well as I don't like to be chatted to when being served.
1jola 14 | 1,879
5 Jan 2013  #8
Yes, because your life is soooo busy and you must do your shopping very quickly... to rush back to your laptop. You should be careful, or you'll age into one of those hags who breathe on the person's neck before them. I chat with sellers and in most shops I go to regularly and have nice friendly relationships with them. Not that I need to, but I can walk out now and go shopping with no money and come back with any groceries I need. Same with pub bills.

Anyway, my point was to use some diminutives as they will sound nice and funny, coming from a foreigner, and that will most likely put a smile on even a stone faced seller. Gumishu had the right idea, and it's important to learn the phrases correctly , so they are understood.
zetigrek
5 Jan 2013  #9
Yes, because your life is soooo busy and you must do your shopping very quickly... to rush back to your laptop.

That's right, I don't like to waste time for such mundane activities like shopping :)
Wroclaw Boy
5 Jan 2013  #10
You should be careful, or you'll age into one of those hags who breathe on the person's neck before them.

Ahh the old neck breathing hag....
Volvox - | 2
10 Jan 2013  #11
similarly you can add Pani Kochaniutka. but only with a woman - for males Panie kochany

This should work: Paczkę fajeczek, droga Pani, i zapałeczki.

My friend works as a shopkeeper, and only people who say:
Pani Kochaniutka,
Paczkę fajeczek, droga Pani, i zapałeczki.
I jeszcze flaszeczkę zacnego trunku za 1,99, słodziutka.
are drunkards and bums ;)
Normal people usually only say "Dzień dobry (Good day)", but as being already said - this is not so common in Poland. Usually shoopkeepers at bazaar (market?) are more nice, but mostly for familiar people.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
10 Jan 2013  #12
Normal people usually only say "Dzień dobry (Good day)", but as being already said - this is not so common in Poland

Is this true???
Has it really gotten like that?
Back in the day it was omnipresent, the "Dzien dobry" and "Dowidzenia" spoken in shops.
phtoa 9 | 236
10 Jan 2013  #13
Maybe stop to be nice if they are not nice to you.

So your're telling me, that if somebody is not being nice to you, you should just be an A hole right back at them?

What a great and positive perspective on life!

I often chat up (with my limited Polish) the ladies/guys behind the counter at my local shops, and they love it. Nobody else does it to them, so I can tell they really appreciate it. Obviously I do not do this if there are 50 ppl in line behind, but if u stand as one of the only people there, go for it buddy.
smurf 39 | 1,982
10 Jan 2013  #14
'fist a nanny in her vag'

Bahhahaha

Please someone tell me how to say this in Polish :)
Hilarious


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