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Poland is safe to visit - "Daily Mail"


jon357 67 | 16,831
18 May 2016 #61
No, she is not obliged to go to the UK court (the country she has nothing to do with) just because he decided so.

Actually Wulks, yes, she does. She is very much obliged to respond to a lawsuit against her. She can choose to ignore a summons however that would mean she were I represented and the judge would decide whether to appoint a lawyer on her behalf.

Although it may upset you personally Wulkan that an injured person can sue for compensation in their own jurisdiction, that is the law, and it is easy to collect the damages.

Its up to the Polish legal system to deal with it, and from what I've heard from the legal system in the UK it is, one rule for Poles and another for any foreigner

This is sadly very true and will sooner or later become an issue however regardless of the criminal case involving the woman, the civil case for damages (and the photos suggest he is damaged) can be (and should be if the guy's got half a brain) under English or Scottish (if he lives, works there or has property there) law. Not sue what you mean by UK law - do you mean English law?

am surprised myself.i used bleach without gloves and never had any burns

It was probably some commercial stuff, much stronger than supermarket bleach and if she was handling the hazardous materials as part of her job, she should be expected to know the safety issues. And ignorance of the possible extent of the crime you've committed isn't a defence, just a possible mitigation that a judge is likely to ignore.
Dougpol1 32 | 2,673
18 May 2016 #62
while one case where pole was killed by bunch of blacks in neasden.

hay are incredibly harsh on poles in courts.

Que? Probably because it seems harsh because Poles (for instance) don't appear to appreciate that (to take one instance of UK law) you will get a years' driving ban ( and quite rightly too) for not stopping at a pedestrian crossing when my foot is actually on the crossing?

The key is to be informed of the law. To suggest that British magistrates, with all the public accountability that there is, are unduly harsh on people because they are Polish is laughable.

Give us specific comparisons for the same crime scenario and we might listen.
In the meantime it's just another of your racist rants.
Wulkan - | 3,243
18 May 2016 #63
Actually Wulks, yes, she does. She is very much obliged to respond to a lawsuit against her.

In the country she lives, yes. Yesterday I received a letter from Romania, I'ts in Romanian So I don't understand it but someone must have sued me there so I guess I'll pack myself and catch the flight to Romania :-)))

Although it may upset you personally Wulkan

Your ignorance can't upset me, don't worry.
Tictactoe
18 May 2016 #64
I worked for the Ministry of Justice for 8 yrs. She will have to be found guilty of the offence in Poland before he can take it any further here. The courts will not entertain it less she has a guilty verdict against her.

He can then bring a civil suit against her for damages, compensation here, but getting the awarded sum will prove very hard.

I have very little hope for the guy, its up to Poland to punish her.
jon357 67 | 16,831
18 May 2016 #65
She will have to be found guilty of the offence in Poland before he can take it any further here.

Sort of. It could be done without however it would be much more expensive.

but getting the awarded sum will prove very hard.

That's become a lot easier recently.
Wulkan - | 3,243
18 May 2016 #66
She will have to be found guilty of the offence in Poland before he can take it any further here.

Of course, it's clear to every one or almost every one.
jon357 67 | 16,831
18 May 2016 #67
Actually no. The crime is so severe that if the polish so-called courts ignored it or dragged their heels, a private prosecution would be easy.

Anyway, there will doubtless be a civl case in the UK.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
19 May 2016 #68
Bullying is rife, if it is not one thing it would be something else.

I could agree with that somehow but let's be honest, If Harold or another "expat" opened yet another thread about some black dude, who visited Poland and now cry because people were "staring at him" or somethin, you would likely be there screaming racism.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,845
19 May 2016 #69
you would likely be there screaming racism.

no I really wouldn't - you know what I hate being cast into a fictitious role by people who don't know me at all.

And why would I have been 'screaming' anyway? Interesting choice of word for lines on a screen....
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
19 May 2016 #70
Your repetition of lies won't purchase one iota of truth.

The truth is that you couldn't care less about this girl. You only care about using her death to push your own agenda.

Legitimate sources please. Surely you can come up with at least one. And no, your imagination-fed agitprop doesn't count.

I doubt anyone would bother to study the invention of tin-foil hat enthusiasts. No-one would risk their academic career over something so nonsensical.
Bieganski 17 | 896
19 May 2016 #71
The truth is that you couldn't care less about this girl. You only care about using her death to push your own agenda.

A repeated lie is still a lie.

I doubt anyone would bother to study the invention of tin-foil hat enthusiasts. No-one would risk their academic career over something so nonsensical.

But only a moment ago you claimed:

Polonophobia is nothing but an invention of the far-right to justify racism towards others.

That sounds like a very serious issue though. Obviously one which you took the time to study yourself. It must be the case then that you don't have the prospects of an academic career so there was never anything there for you to put at risk.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
19 May 2016 #72
A repeated lie is still a lie.

No lies there. If you cared about her, you would've highlighted the real issue - the mental health of teenagers. Instead, you used it to launch yet another bitter attack on Britain.

That sounds like a very serious issue though.

Not really. It's mostly found on the internet and the people promoting such views tend to stay under the stairs. There are worse things to worry about, such as the rising amount of attacks on foreigners in Poland.

It must be the case then that you don't have the prospects of an academic career so there was never anything there for you to put at risk.

Au contaire, I have several published articles to my name. Never been interested in working in the bureaucratic and ridiculously formal university sector though.

Perhaps you should write something about imagined Polonophobia? You could explore the correlation between wearing a tin foil hat with perceived examples of Polonophobia. I imagine there's a very high correlation.
Wulkan - | 3,243
19 May 2016 #73
Perhaps you should write something about imagined Polonophobia?

Or imagined islamophobia or homophobia.
Bieganski 17 | 896
19 May 2016 #74
you would've highlighted the real issue - the mental health of teenagers.

Yep, right on cue, blame the victim. That's the evasion tactic all bullies, racists and Polonophobes use to avoid responsibility for their despicable behavior. Never mind that a person can only take so much abuse from others. Never mind that she was fine and healthy before moving to Blighty. Never mind that her expressed concern about racism against her was a cry for help. Never mind that like in the case of Daniel Pelka's slow motion abuse they were both met with indifference by wider British society who could have said something or done something to help. But no one cared. No, actually they only thing you lot secretly care about is enjoying the spectacle of seeing someone else who is different from you suffer. And history has record this over and over again.

It's mostly found on the internet and the people promoting such views tend to stay under the stairs.

You can provide quite a peculiar level of detail about a topic which you simultaneously claim doesn't even exist. And why the repeated talk about stairs? Granted you obviously come from a long line of stock who worked downstairs for the people who lived upstairs but you don't need to project this onto others. Just be like your ancestors and know your place.

There are worse things to worry about, such as the rising amount of attacks on foreigners in Poland.

How on earth are the hurt feelings and misplaced expectations of foreigners rich enough to travel to Poland who feel slighted for not being treated like royalty worse off than Poles living abroad who suffer from Polonophobia and in circumstances so bad that it literally leads to their death?

I'm not surprised at all though that you are putting the regard for foreigners above that of Poles. Polonophobes naturally do. Like I said in another thread some people's interest in Poland has nothing to do with Polish people or Polish culture. They want to secure land and property in Poland and seek prospects for a better life for themselves and their own kind. This is not a 21st century phenomena either. In the 1940's the Germans violently displayed a similar attitude towards Poland and Poles. I recall now you once posted that you are quite fond of Berlin. Now I understand why.

Au contaire, I have several published articles to my name.

Oh? I didn't know you used to give articles to your mate and fellow carpetbagger Szczecinian to publish in his online rag. I haven't seen him post anything on here in ages. Is he well? I take it that wannabe-Guardian venture of his is now defunct. Kind of like many of your own in your (ahem) "portfolio" career.

Perhaps you should write something about imagined Polonophobia?

The problem is real. Your denials and dismissive behavior won't change this fact but only serve to underscore it.
jon357 67 | 16,831
19 May 2016 #75
I really do despise these North American posters who have no knowledge of Europe trying to use what they learn on the internet to further their thinly-veiled agenda

Exactly. School bullying nowadays is taken more seriously in the UK than almost anywhere else, the UK is one of the least xenophobic societies in the world, the school she attended has quite a few other Polish kids, we don't know yet about the bullying, who did it or even if it happened at all and teenage suicides in developed countries are all too common.

But hey, some Canadian teenager with a chip on his shoulder and no personal experience of either the UK or Poland decides to make long posts online about it...
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,161
19 May 2016 #76
the UK is one of the least xenophobic societies in the world

UK saint, as usual. Quite a few non-English residents wouldn't agree with that.
jon357 67 | 16,831
19 May 2016 #77
Quite a few non-English residents wouldn't agree with that.

Millions however would.
AdrianK9 6 | 369
19 May 2016 #78
According to Pew research, actually the most racist/xenophobic countries are Arab and African countries - Saudi Arabia, India, Iran, Egypt, Nigeria have the highest percentage of respondents who stated they would not want a neighbor of another race.

Funny because these same people have no problem moving into richer western countries...

washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2013/05/15/a-fascinating-map-of-the-worlds-most-and-least-racially-tolerant-countries
jon357 67 | 16,831
19 May 2016 #79
actually the most racist/xenophobic countries are Arab and African countries

They, however are not in Europe.
nothanks - | 640
19 May 2016 #80
Funny because these same people have no problem moving into richer western countries...

Leftists think these people are stupid and just need to be educated and they will see the light

Reality is they view European/White current global standing as a byproduct of colonization and geography. So essentially luck. When in reality we have a superior culture and that has roots in our genetics. I have no problem admitting Asians are smarter and Blacks better athletes. Asians also have the same realistic view point towards our culture.

So these immigrants don't respect us or our way of life. They think we are where we are because of luck and thus it's their duty to bring their superior culture over and help cure our degenerate society.
AdrianK9 6 | 369
19 May 2016 #81
They, however are not in Europe.

True - Poland is actually a pretty open and welcoming society compared to places like India, Iran, etc. However, compared to multicultural western Europe - definitely not. We're perhaps more accepting of foreigners than places like Turkey or Egypt but less so than Germany or England.

62% of Poles state that agree that 'our way of life needs to be protected from foreign influence' The part on multinational corps, trade unions, and international organizations is also interesting as it pertains to Poland - most Poles do not find that it is a good influence on their country. 60% of Poles also apparently do not like the pace of modern life.

Numbers are highest amongst Asian, African, and Muslim countries. 74% of Indians believe their culture is superior.

pewglobal.org/2003/06/03/chapter-5-nationalism-sovereignty-and-views-of-global-institutions

Immigrants are particularly unpopular across Europe. In every European country except Bulgaria immigrants, on balance, are seen as having a bad influence on the country. This negative sentiment coincides with the fact that for the first time in modern history, immigrants now comprise a large and growing minority in every...

Bieganski 17 | 896
20 May 2016 #82
School bullying nowadays is taken more seriously in the UK than almost anywhere else, the UK is one of the least xenophobic societies in the world

Looks like yet another carpetbagger with his head buried deep in the sand (or more to the point up his own fundament) when it comes to the reality of Polonophobia.

Here is a very revealing article published on 19 May in Britain's Telegraph newspaper in response to Dagmara's suffering at the hands of British bullies. Not surprisingly it is completely opposite (i.e., it's the truth) to what the usual suspects on PF are trying to sugarcoat and preferably want sweep under a rug.

The shocking reality of racist bullying in British schools

"...the tragic case does shine a light on the torment that goes on everyday in British schools...1.5 million young people have been bullied within the past year in the UK, and those who had an ethnic minority profile were at a much higher risk of being bullied...people need to recognise the impact it has and that attacking someone's identity is harmful to them."

Source: telegraph.co.uk/women/life/the-shocking-reality-of-racist-bullying-in-british-schools
Tictactoe
20 May 2016 #83
It's the first of it's kind in the UK but certainly not a rare incident in US schools. America always leads the way.

edition.cnn.com/2013/09/02/us/connecticut-teen-suicide/
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,845
20 May 2016 #84
t's the first of it's kind in the UK b

really? What on earth makes you think that?

School bullying nowadays is taken more seriously in the UK than almost anywhere else, the UK is one of the least xenophobic societies in the world

jon I am sorry but I think you are deluded.
jon357 67 | 16,831
20 May 2016 #85
Which point? That bullying is taken seriously more nowadays than ever before or that the UK is far less xenophobic than most other places, including Poland?
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,845
20 May 2016 #86
both Jon. You don't find out what knuts people are until you have kids, or marry a non-Brit. or both.

When my boy started secondary, a kid followed him round for literally weeks shouting abuse at him. He would actively seek him out to do this, shouting gayboy or whatever.

After many weeks of this, my son lost it and pushed him over and gave him a kick.
Guess who got suspended and who got an apology and a pat on the head?
européen
20 May 2016 #87
Xenophobia is blooming in England like mould on the walls. Just because you cover it up with some paint, doesn't mean it's gone.
jon357 67 | 16,831
20 May 2016 #88
Both are a fair assessment; bullying policies are a new thing - even if they're only partially effective it's better than nothing, which is what we had before. The U.K. too is a lot less xenophobic than most of Europe.

We'd probably better continue in random chat, this has gone off the topic.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
20 May 2016 #89
less xenophobic than most of Europe

And it is precisely such xenophilia that has already become the UK's undoing and is udnermining the very pillars of Western civilisation. OK, one migth argue that the ex-colonial powers deserve such punishment, but what about countries whose flag the sun did set, who did not exploit and get rich on entire subjugated nations? Should they also have to pay the price for Anglo-Franco-Hispano-Portuguese greed, grnadeur and aggression? And similarly, should innocent countries be forced to pay the price for Merkel's folly?
RubasznyRumcajs 5 | 488
20 May 2016 #90
I wonder if they still consider Poland to be a safe place after last bomb has exploded in Wrocław.


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