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The rising costs of food and fuel in Poland and the effects on disposable income/economy


milky 13 | 1,657
17 Jan 2011 #1
How! can Polish people afford to put petrol in their cars, especially if they have a 30-60 km drive to work.
convex 20 | 3,978
17 Jan 2011 #2
Same way just about everyone else does. They go to work, money gets dumped into an account, and they buy things with that money. Like houses, cars, groceries, LCD tvs, even gas.
Olaf 6 | 956
17 Jan 2011 #3
Hahahah! Brilliant answer Mr. Convex!

Milky: This is not a problem for many drivers in Poland. The rising prices do not affect them because they always buy petrol for 50 PLN ;)))

That's what I heard from one bloke.
alexw68
17 Jan 2011 #4
That and anyone I know who drives that kind of distance to work (I assume you mean daily) either:

a) is loaded and doesn't care;
b) rides shotgun of the back of a dodgy old truck with 8 workmates;
c) takes public transport.

And yes, I bet all the country folk use red diesel at a fraction of the official price. They do in the UK in some of the more isolated communities...
Olaf 6 | 956
17 Jan 2011 #5
Once started, good old Mercedes diesel engines could run even pis.s.
Avalon 4 | 1,068
17 Jan 2011 #6
- milky
- How! can Polish people afford to put petrol in their cars, especially if they have a 30-60 km drive to work.

Petrol is more expensive in Ireland, why should the price in Poland affect you!!!
paulinska 9 | 86
17 Jan 2011 #7
Unless you live in the Gulf, where a litre of water is much more expensive than a litre of petrol, Petrol prices are a global issue - not just Poland!

I bet all the country folk use red diesel at a fraction of the official price. They do in the UK in some of the more isolated communities...

Customs has vigorously cracked down the usage of red diesel - U get a hefty fine, confiscated car and ordered to pay taxes on the fuel you've used.

As people are finding out, red diesel is not that cheap, afterall!
poland_
17 Jan 2011 #8
The rising prices do not affect them because they always buy petrol for 50 PLN ;)))

That is a very good point, I have my stations that I tank up at and I always fill, with a standard amount of money, not liters of fuel. Probably like most I don't even bother to look at the price per liter in the winter as the pump attendant does the job.
OP milky 13 | 1,657
17 Jan 2011 #9
Same way just about everyone else does. They go to work, money gets dumped into an account, and they buy things with that money. Like houses, cars, groceries, LCD tvs, even gas.

Did i not say "afford"

This is not a problem for many drivers in Poland.

bollshit

Petrol prices are a global issue -

Im talking about the price of petrol in POLAND, where the the minimum wage is 2 euro an hour. How do THEY afford to travel tp work if they live in the country side.

Can a Polish person answer, for a change

Probably like most I don't even bother to look at the price per liter in the winter as the pump attendant does the job.

good for you....
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
17 Jan 2011 #10
Comparatively petrol is very expensive here in Poland, no question.

Many people use public transport or have gas adapted cars (gas is much cheaper).

It all comes down to planning ahead but you have a point M, petrol is very expensive when compared to the wages.

* what do Americans call 'gas' not petrol but gas?

Im talking about the price of petrol in POLAND, where the the minimum wage is 2 euro an hour. How do THEY afford to travel tp work if they live in the country side.

They take public transport.
OP milky 13 | 1,657
17 Jan 2011 #11
They take public transport.

ok.at least its an answer,,cheers man.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
17 Jan 2011 #12
ok.at least its an answer

They also use Gas, like Ireland used to, you can convert any car, with an extra gas tank in the boot, it is much cheaper.
convex 20 | 3,978
17 Jan 2011 #13
Did i not say "afford"

Yea, and I gave you an answer. I don't know anyone with a car that can't afford to put gas in it. Wages have risen faster than the price of fuel. Do you just have experience with impoverished people in Poland?
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
17 Jan 2011 #14
can't afford to put gas in it.

What do you call gas, as in not petrol but gas?

Wages have risen faster than the price of fuel.

How much is a litre of petrol in the states?
Or anywhere else?

It is a little cheaper her for petrol than Ireland and with the wage difference it is huge but people here are used to it.
convex 20 | 3,978
17 Jan 2011 #15
What do you call gas, as in not petrol but gas?

propane?
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
17 Jan 2011 #16
Ah ok, funnily enough it's a liquid (go figure) a mix of Propane and Butane.

So to summarize what we have learned so far,

Gas is what Americans call liquid petrol and gas is what Europeans call liquid Propane and Butane.

We should just call'em liquid :)
Varsovian 92 | 634
17 Jan 2011 #17
methane OR butane OR natural gas

Mind you, what do you expect when they are mixed up over the location of a fanny?
convex 20 | 3,978
17 Jan 2011 #18
Ah ok, funnily enough it's a liquid (go figure) a mix of Propane and Butane.

Ah, we call it LPG, not all that common.

Have LPG prices risen?
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
17 Jan 2011 #19
not all that common.

You must have noticed that it is common here in Poland?

that and CB radios, you see the aerials all over the place, again much cheaper than mobile phones.
OP milky 13 | 1,657
17 Jan 2011 #20
I don't know anyone with a car that can't afford to put gas in it.

ok..life in a bubble eh ?

Yea, and I gave you an answer.

no you did not.

Do you just have experience with impoverished people in Poland?

??? strange question...."just". I think the majority in Poland are very angry about petrol..
convex 20 | 3,978
17 Jan 2011 #21
ok..life in a bubble eh ?

I guess. Anyone else here living in the same bubble?

no you did not.

People go to work, they make money, and they buy things. It's not any different here than anywhere else.

??? strange question...."just". I think the majority in Poland are very angry about petrol..

Everyone gets angry when prices increase. I don't know of any countries where people go, meh, fuel prices have gone up, no worries.
OP milky 13 | 1,657
17 Jan 2011 #22
Everyone gets angry when prices increase.

but in Places like Poland,it can take a large chunk out of your wage. A 40 minute drive to work could take a third of your wages, compared to a tenth in Ireland;I suppose public transport is a solution but that depends on your location and Bus/train routes. Also In the bad weather buses are delayed, so the car may be the only way to get you to work, on time.
poland_
17 Jan 2011 #23
How! can Polish people afford to put petrol in their cars, especially if they have a 30-60 km drive to work.

Well the obvious answer to this question should be - They must find a job closer to home if they can't afford the petrol prices or move closer to their job.

Below is a link for the Mercers report, in which they quote the most expensive cities to live in 2010. - Warsaw, Poland ranks number 96 ( Polands most expensive city)

guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jun/30/city-costs-living
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
17 Jan 2011 #24
The report for the most expensive cities just tells you where prices are highest. There could be other factors determining how people are managing those costs. Factors like gross domestic product and per capita income are just as meaningful as where a city places on a list like that.
poland_
17 Jan 2011 #25
Mercer’s quality of living reports are very respected , and contain the following variables:

Political and Social Environment

Relationship with other Countries
Internal Stability
Crime
Law Enforcement
Ease of Entry and Exit

Economic Environment

Currency Exchange Regulations
Banking Services

Socio-Cultural Environment

Limitation on Personal Freedom
Media and Censorship
Medical and Health Considerations

Hospital Services
Medical Supplies
Infectious Diseases
Water Potability
Sewage
Waste removal
Air Pollution
Troublesome and Destructive
Animals and Insects

Schools and Education

Schools

Natural Environment

Climate
Record of Natural
Disasters
Public Services and Transport

Electricity
Water Availability
Telephone
Mail
Public Transport
Traffic Congestion
Airport

Recreation

Variety of Restaurants
Theatrical and Musical
Performances
Cinemas
Sport and Leisure Activities

Consumer Goods

Meat and Fish
Fruits and Vegetables
Daily Consumption Items
Alcoholic Beverages
Automobiles

Housing

Housing
Household Appliances
and Furniture
Household Maintenance
and Repair
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
17 Jan 2011 #26
I prefer to look up GDP and PCI for a country on wiki. That gives me a better idea of what kind of economic shape a country is in.
convex 20 | 3,978
17 Jan 2011 #27
GDP per capita is worthless without taking into account the Gini coefficient. Then you can take a look at the CPI for a basket of goods across multiple countries and get a good idea of how expensive/cheap it is for "most" people.
poland_
17 Jan 2011 #28
I prefer to look up GDP and PCI for a country on wiki. That gives me a better idea of what kind of economic shape a country is in.

I understand,the thread is about real everyday costs related to living in Poland, or at least that is how I interpret.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
17 Jan 2011 #29
I understand,the thread is about real everyday costs related to living in Poland,

It's per capita income that relates to this topic more than the list of most expensive cities. If people don't have enough income it doesn't matter how expensive the city is or isn't.
OP milky 13 | 1,657
17 Jan 2011 #30
Well the obvious answer to this question should be - They must find a job closer to home if they can't afford the petrol prices or move closer to their job.

Easier said than done.


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