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If I move to a big city in Poland will I come across a lot of English speakers?


Squirely 2 | 6
1 Feb 2010 #1
I'm considering moving to Poland (with my 3year boy) after completing a Teach English As A Forgen Llanguage course and was wondering if I moved to a big city if it was likely I will I come across alot of english speaking people??
McCoy 27 | 1,269
1 Feb 2010 #2
Wondering what my chances are?

87%
frd 7 | 1,401
1 Feb 2010 #3
In a major city higher than anywhere else.. but as McCoy has pointed out it's hard to forsee.. and it would be just guessing.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
1 Feb 2010 #4
Stay where u are. Bringing ur child up here is like crucifying the poor dab. He will never forgive u in later life.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
1 Feb 2010 #5
and was wondering if I moved to a big city if it was likely I will I come across alot of english speaking people??

are you looking for friends ?
OP Squirely 2 | 6
1 Feb 2010 #6
I would defantly welcome a friendship with some1 living in Poland, I need to start some where.
Avalon 4 | 1,068
1 Feb 2010 #7
I have been here for nearly 7 years. I can understand your reasons. If you need any questions answered, PM me.
OP Squirely 2 | 6
1 Feb 2010 #8
What would make you say that? What cud possible mess him up so bad? You move to Poland from Wales (I live in Cardiff) and you like it?
Ironside 51 | 11,337
2 Feb 2010 #9
don't listen to him he is bitter twitter
mira - | 115
2 Feb 2010 #10
87%

I would like to know in which city then. Polish people do speak english, but not THAT many at the level where one can find it satisfying.

Besides, not many are eager to speak english in a polish speaking country.
OP Squirely 2 | 6
2 Feb 2010 #11
Ooow I don't have a plan just as yet. Krakow or Warszaw. Just because I think there's more chance. My boyfriend lives in Gorzow and I know there's not much chanc there. I don't know I wud be cool to just have some Brit or Americans for some company.
Ajb 6 | 232
2 Feb 2010 #12
Krakow or Warszaw

There are many Brit/American people in these towns, you will have no problems finding people!
frd 7 | 1,401
2 Feb 2010 #13
Welshguyinpoland probably meant that the cultural shock is much bigger for a child, and when the little kid is learning and experiencing he should be in a well known for him environment, familiar language, similar kids.. I definitely agree with that..
vndunne 43 | 279
2 Feb 2010 #14
but not THAT many at the level where one can find it satisfying.
Besides, not many are eager to speak english in a polish speaking country.

I find that there are a lot of polish people with a very good level of english to have a good conversation especially in Warsaw or Poznan.(and probably Krakow). Also, i find them very eager to speak it in order to get some practice in speaking to a native speaker.
bookratt 6 | 85
2 Feb 2010 #15
Yes, if you live in Krakow. I am an American who has lived here since Fall 2007 with my husband and son. My son was 4 when we arrived and entered preschool for the first time here.

Yes there is some culture shock, especially if like me, you have never lived or traveled abroad before. My husband had done so and for him, it was less. But your child will take its cues on how to behave and how to react from you, so be calm, be patient and be prepared. Have a sense of humor, know what to expect, have a plan and things will be fine.

We have had very little difficuty finding English speakers whether from Poland, the UK, France, Malaysia or anywhere else. You just have to know where to look to find friends and activities that will suit you and your child.

The Dziennik Polski newspaper has an English online version and The Krakow Post here is in English. Look for things like that where you are.

Check out Cracow-Online, too.

There is a women's international group in nearly every large city here, aimed at helping women expats and their families settle in and which also engage in volunteer work here. Krakow's group is called IWAK. Read all about us at IWAK.pl.

If you are a French speaker, Accueil-type groups exist in other cities, too. To gain access to the Krakow group's website and see the newsletter of Cracovie Accueil, you can start here: cracovieaccueil.wordpress.com.

Learn a bit of Polish before coming, read up a bit on the history of this country and learn about the area you plan to live in.

Jobs are not plentiful, but if you have the TOEFL certificate and some basic Polish, or are willing to learn some, you will be better off than most and if you can teach business English or can gear lessons toward medical, technical or financial English, you will soon be in demand.

Connect with your consulate or embassy immediately upon arriving in the country. Be aware that you can volunteer to teach English here with a simple stay visa, but cannot accept money for doing so--for that you need a work visa, no matter what anyone tells you.

Look into joining The English Language Club in your new home city. There are ads placed in the Polish version of Gumtree sometimes. krakow.gumtree.pl

You and your child should be fine, with a little preparation and some friendly help and advice. Just make realistic goals, have a backup plan, be patient and you'll see.

Good luck!
District12a 2 | 12
5 Sep 2011 #16
yes, some might even speak german. mainly warsaw, lodz and krakow. poznan, gdansk are also good exceptions :)
Blackdream888 1 | 2
16 Nov 2011 #17
Merged: Traveling to Poland - do Polish mostly speak English?

Do mostly polish speak English?
Olaf 6 | 956
16 Nov 2011 #18
Yes, most people you meet in the streets of a bigger city or in shops, cafes etc. And if you care to learn to say dzień dobry (good morning/day) and dziękuję (thank you) - they'll love you.
Lyzko
16 Nov 2011 #19
As in Indonesia, in tourist areas, English will be spoken. Outside those areas, ah, not really.
Curious phenomenon. English-speaking foreigners ARE welcome throughout much of Poland, though often more as curiosities than anything else-:) Most Poles are fascinated with them even if they probably don't know the language. As Olaf said also, a few well-placed "Dzień dobry!", "Dobry wieczór!", "Dziękuję!" and the like, will have the Poles practically eating out of your hand in no timeLOL
roynelson2012 2 | 12
4 Apr 2012 #20
[Moved from]: The cities in Poland that have the most English speakers ?

What are the cities in poland that have the most english speakers ?
Bernie2
27 Aug 2013 #21
Probably:

1. Warsaw.
2. Krakow.
3/4. Wroclaw/Poznan/Gdansk.
monata - | 11
28 Feb 2015 #22
Merged: what's the percentage of people speaking english in poland.

Is it easy for any person to live in poland with english language only, i mean the daily life or polish language is a must ?
Wulkan - | 3,243
28 Feb 2015 #23
You should be ok with just English, there are people on this forum who don't speak Polish after 20 years here and they seem fine.
Lyzko 33 | 8,026
28 Feb 2015 #24
It's always better to at least attempt learning the bread-and-butter survival basics of the language in any country to which one intends to move/work for even a brief period!

Relying on the average Pole to know sufficient English in a pinch, is rather like a drowning victim clutching at a razor blade;
it's barely something, yet scarcely much (....plus, ya can gitcherself cut up reeeaaalll bad)LOL
JollyRomek 7 | 481
28 Feb 2015 #25
You should be ok with just English, there are people on this forum who don't speak Polish after 20 years here and they seem fine.

I agree. You can get by with just English even if you go to one of the mini skleps to buy your bread. After all, we are all able to point at what we want and make ourselves understandable. However, Poles like it when you make a bit of an effort. They are aware of the fact that their language might not be easiest language to learn so they like it if you try. Even if you just ask for a "reklamowka" ( and i probably spelled that wrong) in the local shop, they will appreciate it.

But, to answer your question........... yes, you will be ok with just English in Poland.
jon357 70 | 19,649
1 Mar 2015 #26
Exactly. It's doubtless possible to get by in the capital, perhaps the touristy bits of Kraków too, however in small town Poland no. Even in Warsaw, people don't always have the time or patience to indulge someone who can't speak the language (though there's the other extreme where people either want to practise their English or assume that a going near can't speak Polish).

It's polite anyway to do your best to learn the language of a country you're going to spend time with and is always appreciated. Plus you miss so much not speaking Polish. Just don't stress about making mistakes, acknowledge that language learning is gradual so you aren't going to acquire it all in one go and enjoy.
Lyzko 33 | 8,026
1 Mar 2015 #27
While from experience, I don't deny that especially in the major urban centers, e.g. Warszawa, Kraków, Poznań, Wrocław, Gdańsk etc. there are literally scores of younger Poles who are both competent in English as well as eager to practice their language skills, if anyone still thinks that outside of these areas, in less traveled places, for instance, that the run-of-the-mill person will speak fluent English, I maintain they're in for a bit of a rude shock!

Were it almost any other European country, such as Germany, Czech Republic, Scandinavia, I'd say that of course, even in remote places, there will be a number of tourist-friendly folks, equally competent in English.

I ought to have qualified that last statement! If you're plan on working in either the service or education industry, even the legal field, English alone should not pose a problem these days. Entertainment as well has by now become almost thoroughly international, and so from that perspective, there'd be no pressing need to "know" Polish (aside from the obvious).

Were you though to choose, for example. agriculture, sports, possibly medicine (but not research), a solid grounding in basic Polish might not be a bad idea:-)
Lyzko 33 | 8,026
25 Jan 2019 #28
[moved from]

Once again, I found that the few attempts of Poles speaking English to me in Poland were without exception exercises in futility on both our parts.

Scarcely think my basic questions came off that threatening so that I couldn't even get a decent response.
Ironside 51 | 11,337
25 Jan 2019 #29
peaking English to me in Poland were without exception exercises in futility

Speaking to you in any language is an exercise in futility.
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,138
25 Jan 2019 #30
During my last two visits, I used English 80% of the time and not even once had any problems. In fact, on day 2, I quit asking if they speak English.

I do it almost daily here, in the USA, though.


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