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Looking to immigrate to Europe. How is life in Poland?


Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Oct 2011 #91
Yes, you have more knowledge of Poland collectively, that goes without saying. However, I know for a fact that what I have said above is correct. You were not wrong in some of what you said but, just like a politician, you just see what you want to see. I prefer to give the SA lady the bigger picture.

Conservative is not an insult. It's just a position sb takes, good or bad. Why so defensive, polmed? I am just putting the other side out there. You know that I made some valid points. This is a forum so let's talk. You are the self-confessed 'expert' after all so what are you afraid of?

Take my arguments to shreds. Go on, I dare you to try ;)
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
11 Oct 2011 #92
compared to where? I have set up businesses in the UK so I can talk about the difference between Poland and the UK
setting up a Sp zoo is more expensive and time consuming than setting one up in the UK for example

And Regarding your UK example, the corporation rate in the UK is 20%, and not long ago it was 21%, it is 19% in Poland

And Poland's economy is one of the most stable in Europe, but I've noticed that you have backtracked on some of the earlier rubbish you have posted.
polmed 1 | 216
11 Oct 2011 #93
Take my arguments to shreds. Go on, I dare you to try ;)

If I only had time I would do it , but I am a busy woman so my answers depend on how much time I have on a prticular day .
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Oct 2011 #94
Hague, you make fair points in your comparisons to GB. GB has traditionally been a boom&bust economy and Poland is much more stable in comparison. My advice to the OP would be, steer clear of legal pitfalls and brush up on any business law applicable to your situation. Poland's economy is thriving in many areas and is one of the beacons of Europe. However, the OECD urge caution as you may end up embroiled in a protracted legal case in which Poland doesn't fare too well. Avoid that, make the right contacts and you are off to a flier.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
11 Oct 2011 #95
Hague, you make fair points in your comparisons to GB.

Don't get me wrong Seanus, I am not extolling the virtues of the Polish economy and saying everything is perfect, I know that it is not. I was responding to what was a ridicules blanket statement and putting some reality into the picture. In any case I am sure that our OP will make right decision, one that is best for her.
Brit-Pol
11 Oct 2011 #96
I was born here I live here and I have more knowledge about Poland than you with your expat comrades taken together .

Says who and how do you quantify that?

Tell me Polmed......You take a trip down to the carrefour......Seanus, yourself and myself cross paths.....what makes your shopping experience any different to ours? You stand at the stop waiting for the tram, Seanus and I are stood next to you.....what makes your wait any different to ours?

Yes, you have more knowledge of Poland collectively, that goes without saying.

You think so?

What are the qualifying criteria? Expat? So what!!

My Dziadek and Babcia are Polish. My wife is Polish and I live in Poland but I wasn't born in Poland does that make me less qualified than Polmed to offer an opinion simply because I was not born in Poland?

I live here....I live as a Pole. I share the same experiences, the same rigours, the same frustrations as any other Pole living in Poland. I spend a penny in the same toilets!! (Depending on gender of course)

Year on year Poland changes. Poland is not the same Poland I returned to 6 years ago. A lot of my friends return to Poland and do not recognise the place. To a man they remark that Poland is not the country they left and that it has changed considerably. Many of them now fear returning and many have said categorically that they will not return.

If you have been in Poland for the last 5 or 6 years you probably have more idea of Poland than the vast majority of those that left to live/work overseas becasue Poland is not the Poland of 2005
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Oct 2011 #97
I would extol the virtues of the Polish economy, why not? Check the wikipedia page (not so official, I know) on the topic and you'll see. Cross-reference various sources and you will see a rosy picture. However, my point is this. Who really sees that money? PO are not really focussing on those on the breadline. Maybe it's the socialist part in me but too many are being left to fall by the wayside and into oblivion. Yeah, some people have to learn to help themselves but that only goes so far.

One thing that cannot be denied is that Poland has come a long way in 21 years. They had a great minister in SÅ‚awomir Skrzypek RIP and are holding the ship together well. However, Tusk has squandered an astronomical figure in the war in Afghanistan. That money could have been used for roads, hospitals and education. So NATO would only have had 41 members instead of 42 in operation? So what?? Obama hasn't even waivered the visa requirement so what has Poland got back other than body bags??
weetzielynn - | 8
11 Oct 2011 #98
Anandi,

Back to your original question...I just wanted to point out an area for concern that may influence your location decision. You did not mention the ages of your children, but if they are school age be sure to research the schools in the area. Your children will be required to speak and write in Polish to enter the public school system. The schools do not provide programs to help them transition into the language. Have your children starts polish lessons now. You can also look into the English/International schools, but they are not cheap and for one child run about 4500-6000 PLN a month, per child. At least this has been my experience since moving to the Trojmiasto area.

Otherwise, Poland is a wonderful country and we have been happy with our decision to move here!

Good luck to you!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Oct 2011 #99
Nice post, weet. Good to read some personal stories as opposed to PR leaflets.
District12a 2 | 12
11 Oct 2011 #100
I am an American living in Poland, I have many ethnicities and one of them is Polish. I live in warsaw whcih I saw is a great city. Yes Poland is a great country to live in. I'd live In warsaw, but Poznan and krakow are good cities to. Health good, just the roads arent so good but there workin on them. Zapraszamy do polski!
PWEI 3 | 612
11 Oct 2011 #101
Interesting to see a member of Polonia actually visiting Poland! Makes a very refreshing change.

While I agree with you that Warsaw is a cracking city to live in (which is why I live here), are you really saying that the health service here is good?!
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
11 Oct 2011 #102
are you really saying that the health service here is good?!

It can be, is the best answer.

My local all-night drop in clinic, for instance, is fantastic.
PWEI 3 | 612
11 Oct 2011 #103
I found it fine in northern Poland (which was admittedly a long time ago) but the times I've had the misfortune to use it here, it was nothing short of a disaster. After the last time I upped our medical insurance to the max.
OP Anandi B 1 | 12
12 Oct 2011 #104
Oh my word!!!! This whole week I have been at a food show in Germany and was to busy to check the sight for replies to my thread...and whow I can not believe all that I have just read. Thanks for all the positive and helpfull replies, I really appreciate everyone taking the time to give me the info and being so helpfull =)! And for ALL the negative and quite...not sure how to describe them, but lets just start with getting some things clear! I am WHITE, AFRIKAANS is my first language and my family are farmers BOERE, my name ANANDI came from combining my grandmothers names! I had many people telling me it sound african as Chaka Zulu's mothers name was Nandi, but never Indian! hehe :D I don't have kids yet and I will not be looking for a job as I run a family business with my husband and we are doing great business with Poland and other contries by importing products to Southern Africa.

South Africa will always stay our 2nd home as we will always have family and friends there and on going business.

So far I am looking at cities Warsaw, Krakow, Poznan and Wroclaw...planning to come visit Poland in January to experience the cold as us South Africans do not know how cold winters with - degrees feels.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Oct 2011 #105
You might be glad to know that the bigger cities are expanding their wine trade. I guess, as a SA, that you like a good white wine :) :) Although hardly the mecca of wines, Poland is developing its range. Even here in Gliwice, I have some decent places to get all I need. Other posters might be having a laugh here but wine is a way of life for some people, esp from SA.
OP Anandi B 1 | 12
12 Oct 2011 #106
I love red wine, there is nothing better than a glass of good red wine at the end on a long day! And yes even if I should say so myself SA produces some of the BEST wines in the world...and also good trading business! Have you ever been to Cape Town?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Oct 2011 #107
I've never been to SA, no. However, I love the crispness of New World wines. They can be found here but as long as one is not too fussy :) My favourite is Jackson's Estate from Marlborough, NZ. What SA white or red wines would you be looking for in Poland? There are some specialist outlets in major cities.
bullfrog 6 | 602
17 Oct 2011 #108
I love red wine, there is nothing better than a glass of good red wine at the end on a long day! And yes even if I should say so myself SA produces some of the BEST wines in the world...and also good trading business! Have you ever been to Cape Town?

Went twice to Cape Town (we have English friends who spend 6 months living there and 6 months in the UK).. Splendid place, magnificent countryside and very good food and wine (and cheap by western european standards!) Also beautiful beaches and weather, but it's only when I tried to dip a toe in the sea that I understood why you have penguins around!!
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
18 Oct 2011 #109
Oh my word!!!!

which part of SA are you from?
scotto703
9 Sep 2014 #110
My wife is 3rd generation Polish-American and would like us to retire in Poland and maybe start a little business for something to do. Is this possible? Can we purchase some country land to live on and grow a few things? We've been to Poland several times and have traveled around the country, and she feels like she would be "coming home". Any advice?
InWroclaw 89 | 1,914
10 Sep 2014 #111
I don't think you can purchase farmland, not yet anyway. I think the law changes in a couple of years, but no doubt someone else will clarify.

Be prepared to pay tax even on small earnings. If your business makes more than about US$850 a year, you have to pay tax. And you have to pay social security contributions from day 1. Search ZUS in the forum.

Note I'm just getting the ball rolling for you, and others may know more or search the archives.

This might have all the official answers:

paiz.gov.pl/polish_law/purchase_of_real_estate_in_poland
Pani A 2 | 28
12 Sep 2014 #112
You might have more luck posting your own thread rather then bumping one from 2011 ;)
jon357 71 | 21,003
12 Sep 2014 #113
Very possibly however the rules on buying farmland/forestry haven't changed since before then.

I don't think you can purchase farmland, not yet anyway. I think the law changes in a couple of years, but no doubt someone else will clarify.

Someone else here might be more up-to-date than me, not on the law, but on how it's applied - this is important here. As I remember from old discussions here, you can buy farmland, but the vendor can get in trouble selling it if the paperwork is incorrect - there's a thread somewhere in the archives here that discusses an incident where that happened.

There are also different categories of farmland, according to the quality. It's easier to get permission to buy lower quality farmland (the minister has to approve it) however a lot depends on who the minister is at the time.

Remember that after 1990 and even more in 2004 (EU entry) there was a genuine fear that families would be priced off buying land by foreign (meaning German) buyers. This never happened and in fact there's some evidence that Poles are buying across the German border rather than the other way round. Also there's a heavy dose of political nationalism from some quarters - some people even think that if a foreigner buys land in Poland then that land becomes somehow less Polish and two (largely rural) political parties who have no representatives now had a bit more influence around the time the legislation went through, hence the current law

I think the law changes in a couple of years

Yes - this is true. The provision restricting land purchases has a fixed end date and can't be extended by the government.

Certain nearby countries who joined the EU at the same time have scrapped the provision restricting farmland sales before a certain date however Poland hasn't. You can however buy building land without restriction.

My wife is 3rd generation Polish-American

If she could get citizenship, you wouldn't have any problem.

Can we purchase some country land to live on and grow a few things?

Farms tend to be very small in Poland and some pieces of land that aren't classified as farmland are almost as big, so you might in fact be able to do this.

A warning though. Life in Poland can be harder than many people expect.
scotto703
12 Sep 2014 #114
Thanks to all for your answers. I suppose the next thing to do for us is to look into immigration policy and procedures. I currently have a small winery and would likely do that in Poland, if allowed.

Good point about starting my own thread, rather than one 3 years old. :-)

Cheers,
spring1983
30 Mar 2016 #115
hi i am an Indian citizen living in middle east and would like to migrate to Poland. I work in the financial services industry at mid level.

Any thoughts on how i could begin searching for a job and migrate. I would like to move permanently and contribute to the growth of the economy.
Lyzko 36 | 8,441
30 Mar 2016 #116
First off, learn at least the basics of the language! As a second-language speaker of English yourself, don't necessarily rely on the English knowledge of your Polish interlocutor:-) Second of all, make doubly, triply certain that all pertainent documents are in order BEFORE you emigrate, and lastly, try and arrange a sponsor from YOUR country aka India, who is willing to attest to your standing prior to making elaborate plans abroad.

These are the key points, I would think.


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