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Poland's Environment, recycling


Amathyst 19 | 2,702
14 Jan 2007  #1
I wanted to ask if Polish people are as in to recycling as the English, we have been made aware of how much of a disposable society we live in and albeit a bit late we are starting to actually take care of what we throw away - and how we treat our environment My Parents have 4 bins and this is the norm these days.

1. Plastic
2. Glass
3. Paper
4 general rubbish
Oh and they have a compost bin too.

We are told that aerosols are bad and that we should use electricity carefully, cars use unleaded petrol and have catalytic converters so minimised emissions. Agencies have been set up for women with babies who want to use terrie nappies they clean and supply the nappies and the cost is actually lower than purchasing disposable, landfill sites are running out of space and since we use circa. 3 billion disposable nappies a year it's a big problem. The weather is another big issue, this week we have had storms and rain and a few weeks ago we had hailstone, today the sun is shining bright yet the weather forecast tells us it's looking like we're in for a big freeze and snow! Products in supermarkets brag that they are recycled and generally sell at a higher price, yet you'll find them next t.v. dinners in disposable packaging, it's all very contradictory really but I like a lot of other people take it serious since I consider it important not just for me but for future generations to be able to enjoy a normal life.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
14 Jan 2007  #2
I wanted to ask if Polish people are as in to recycling as the English

Not at all until a few years ago, now a little bit, but not much. However we're in EU now, so there are almost the same environment rules (the same since 2012 I think) for industry and business in general.
krysia 23 | 3,058
14 Jan 2007  #3
Yeah, Poland is just getting used to recycling.
This Polish family I know, who lives in the US (ILLEGALY!) does not follow the rules of recycling. Here everyone recycles, but they try to hide cans, bottles, etc, in the garbage so no one will see. It takes a while for the mind to get used to new things.
Magdushya 3 | 104
9 Feb 2007  #4
My Parents have 4 bins and this is the norm these days.

It's so good your parents are like that and you care about recycling. Thanks of persons like you can dissapear these posters that England is full of rubbish. I hope is more clean in your city then in B'ham.
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,512
9 Feb 2007  #5
i went to the supermarket today and walked off with about 5 plastic bags... only bought 4 things... a tad excessive me thinks...
Kowalski 7 | 621
9 Feb 2007  #6
I do save myself papper and plastic botles and have to carry them to special containers some 50 yards which is fine. My beer botles I'd leave outside garbage can and they are later picked up by some junkies who'd sell them later. I don't return bottles myself because they never welcome you well with the bottles. They'd say it's for "exchange only" ...Customer service sucks in Poland big way. I notice Poles don't save water. They'd wash dishes in running water, no soaking. It is happening especially in housholds where there is no individual meters. Still many simply think saving water or energy is a sympthom of poverty. They can afford it.

Some pics from Warsaw:

fz.eco.pl/?a=odpady-067
forgetmenots 4 | 77
9 Feb 2007  #7
well Kowalski
I wouldnt be so hard for polish people. I dont say that polish do care about the environtment because they dont but they care for sure about their pockets, therefore the story about wasted water is not true any longer as well as the energy use is more efficient.

well I do agree about the problem with returning glasses bottles or tons of plastic bags in shopping moles ... maybe the paper is less popular since not every polish family has a car to carry the goods they bought straight home... or maybe bacause it is cheaper to use such a plastic bag as a garbage one :) thats a recycling as well BUHAHAHAHAHHA
Kamyk 2 | 61
9 Feb 2007  #8
y Parents have 4 bins and this is the norm these days.

We do the same in Canada. I have 3 different bins. 1st for plastics/metals, 2nd for paper, 3rd for regular garbage. Yes it takes time to get used to the idea of recycling but after a while it's really no hassle at all.

...Customer service sucks in Poland big way

I agree with that .. but I think it will change over time. I've already noticed the difference when I visited Poland very recently.

I notice Poles don't save water. They'd wash dishes in running water, no soaking. It is happening especially in housholds where there is no individual meters

I always thought that there was a policy put in place couple years ago that every housing unit is supposed to have individual water usage metering to prevent such water waste. Once you pay for what you've used up, people actually started to conserve. I guess the regulation is not fully in place yet.
wonski81 - | 22
9 Feb 2007  #9
In my neigbourhood (UK) the choice of recycling is determined by local council - some areas are environment friendly, some not. In my place there is one large bin for 3 1 bedroom flats emptied on daily basis - I wouldn't call it recycling .

About 7-10 years ago polish local housing where I lived introduced recycling in my area, and it works well since then.
Wasting water is typical for UK, but not for Poland. Some time ago after water alerts in UK one company wanted introduce meters for resident. They did not agree with this idea.10 years ago my parents in Poland asked housing office for permission to put personal water meter in their flat.

When I lived in Netherlands, we didn't have any bins at all - apart from small ones in our own kitchen. We were supposed to place one black bag with organic wastes once a week on the street, the rest (glass, paper, plastic, cans) was to be placed in special containers (some of them about 5 minutes on foot from our flat). We used to do that - noone wants to keep litters inside. For me Netherlands is perfect example.

I used to recognize Polish people in UK, when they placed litters in bin...not only because there are so many Poles.
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
10 Feb 2007  #10
The community I live in in Poland, recycles glass, paper and plastic, as well as ''large'' rubbish (i.e. old tellys, fridges, etc). We're very often visited by private scrap metal collectors (''zlomiarze'' :)). There's been also a sewage system being introduced (very slowly, however), so that the people won't have to collect their waste water and sewage in cesspits (many of them without bottom, so dirty water soaks in soil and possibly contaminates groundwater), and I hope that it'll improve water quality in our local rivers.
Sadie
15 Feb 2007  #11
Wasting water is typical for UK, but not for Poland. Some time ago after water alerts in UK one company wanted introduce meters for resident. They did not agree with this idea.10 years ago my parents in Poland asked housing office for permission to put personal water meter in their flat.

Water rates are quite high in the UK dependant on how the rateable value was set on your property, I had a 3 bed house and the price was £11 per month - I now have a 2 bed flat and my water rates are £36 per month, I have asked for a water meter and the projected costs per month are £15.00 so not only is it envronmentally efficient, its also cost effective for people who live by themselves
iwona 12 | 542
15 Feb 2007  #12
I think that Poland is slowly catching up.

I don't mind all these bins in UK at least rubbish is segregated and recycled.

One good thing in Poland is that in shops we have to pay for single plastic bags so more people have their longer "lasting ones". In Uk they give you free bags everywhere I guess that it is for advert-promotion purposes but environmently friendly?......
Sadie
16 Feb 2007  #13
One good thing in Poland is that in shops we have to pay for single plastic bags so more people have their longer "lasting ones". In Uk they give you free bags everywhere I guess that it is for advert-promotion purposes but environmently friendly?......

People are encoraged to re-use, but its rare that people do.

May I ask a question about recycling in the work place. Do Polish companies actively encorage it? If they do, what kind of schemes are they involved in?

Sadie
Ranj 21 | 948
16 Feb 2007  #14
People are encoraged to re-use, but its rare that people do.

I have found plastic bags come in quite handy when following the dogs on their walks....it certainly makes the neighbours happy when the dogs venture into their yards (if you get my drift). I also use them as liners in small waste cans.:)
Kamyk 2 | 61
17 Feb 2007  #15
I thought I would paste a snapshot of how Germany looks like where the tourist dont see it hehe. So not only Poland has problems with environment, it all depends on us, people living everyday lives and contributing to the mess around ourselves.



Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
17 Feb 2007  #16
I have found plastic bags come in quite handy when following the dogs on their walks....it certainly makes the neighbours happy when the dogs venture into their yards

The locals here all complain about about dog mess and at the same time think I'm a little odd when I clean up what 'Dream' leaves behind.
Zgubiony 15 | 1,554
17 Feb 2007  #17
I have found plastic bags come in quite handy when following the dogs on their walks....it certainly makes the neighbours happy when the dogs venture into their yards (if you get my drift). I also use them as liners in small waste cans

You don't wrap the bag around your hand and pick it up do you? I see people doing this.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
17 Feb 2007  #18
Z,

Yup, that's the way to do it.
forgetmenots 4 | 77
17 Feb 2007  #19
You don't wrap the bag around your hand and pick it up do you?

sheesh thats the perfect way to make what your pet has created lasting forever in that plastic wrapping :) :) :) :) :)
Ranj 21 | 948
17 Feb 2007  #20
You don't wrap the bag around your hand and pick it up do you? I see people doing this.

Of course----it's the most efficient way....I've tried pooper scoopers and those are crap (no pun intended). Don't worry, I always wash my hands (occupational hazard) after taking care of the dogs and any other things.....:)

a snapshot of how Germany looks like where the tourist dont see it

Looks like Germany and my kitchen after a dinner party, have a lot in common:)
Arien
17 Feb 2007  #21
In Holland, we have two large bins, a Grey one and a Green one. The Grey one is supposed to be for domestic rubbish. The Green one is supposed to be for biological rubbish.

We have a smaller box too, this one is supposed to be for batteries and other sorts of chemical rubbish.

We are supposed to deliver our glass ourselves to the nearest supermarket. If they are recyclable bottles, you'll get a small refund for that when you place them into an automated system, the rest of your glass disposal goes into a large container which can be found anywhere near a supermarket.

When you have to dispose of an old couch, cabinet or anything else real big, you're supposed to call the recycling company, and they'll come by with a truck to pick it up for you for a small price.

I know it's a thread about Poland, but it might be interesting for potential Polish immigrants to our country to know that this is how it works here. :)
bossie 1 | 123
17 Feb 2007  #22
Where my parents live there are four bins outdoors, one for paper, one for plastic (always full), one for glass and a big one for general rubbish. The council did what it could (cans get pcked up by local scrap collectors anyway) and the rest is up to people. You can recycle, or you can throw everything into the general rubbish container.

But, as you say, it takes time for people to get used to things. When I still lived with my paents, I had to fight for them to start sparating cans and plastics (newspapers and magaznes were stord separately anyway). Now they're pretty happy with it, every time they go out they take a small bag f rubbish, e.g. plastics, and don't have to worry about the general rubbish so much.

And a word about England. When I lived there, we had problems with the guys who used to pick up rubbish, they appeared to dislike the papers most. Everytime we left magazines and flattened cornflake boxes they left them in the green "ëco" box, then they got wet with rain, started smelling bad, and in the end we were forced to pack them away along with regular rubbish. Not very efficient, is it?

An automted system for glass is a grat idea. In Poland only some supermarkets accept beer bottles, local shops do it only with a rceipt and still unwillingly (after all if you don't return the bottles it's as if they sold them to you).

Milk and cream bottles are a distant memory from my childhood...
tylerdurden 1 | 2
10 Jan 2010  #23
Jan 10, 10, 16:23 - Thread attached on merging:
Warsaw | Recycling system

Hi all,

How's the recycling system in warsaw? Are there special rubbish bins to separate the scraps? I haven't seen them... but actually I haven't looked for it much :)

Thanks!
mephias 11 | 304
10 Jan 2010  #24
Yes, in my apartment there are different containers for paper and plastic and other rubbish. And they are recycled I guess.
wylaw 9 | 15
5 Jun 2012  #25
Merged: Confused about normal / recycling bins in Poland

Hello,

I'm a little bit confused of what goes into the normal bin and what into the recycling bin.

Let's take all the packing that has the following signs on it.

Where do they go?

Thanks!



Jars777 20 | 70
21 Feb 2013  #26
Merged: Recycling instructions

Hello

We have been given instructions for our recycling bins and I would like to make sure I understand it correctly.

The original Polish can be found here: czystemiasto.zut.com.pl/edukacja/1

1) Polish

Tworzywa sztuczne
Wrzucaj:
zgniecione, zakręcone, puste butelki po napojach opakowania po chemii
gospodarcze i kosmetykach
- pojemniki i naczynia z tworzy sztucznych

Pamiętaj;
- zgnieć opakowanie, zakręć nakrętkę przed wrzuceniem wrzucaj czyste opakowania

Nie wrzucaj
- opakowań po olejach i smarach
- opakowań pochodzenia medycznego
- szeleszczących woreczków i reklamówek
- tłustych butelek i pojemników

1) English

Plastics
dispose of:
crushed, twisted, empty bottles of beverage packaging chemicals
economic and cosmetics
- Containers and utensils to create artificial

Keep in mind;
- Bust pack, tighten the nut before throwing dispose of clean packaging

Do not throw
- Boxes of oils and lubricants
- Packaging of medical origin
- Rustling bags and bags
- Greasy bottles and containers

2) Polish

Szkło bezbarwne

Wrzucaj
- butelki i słoiki ze szkła bezbarwnego bez nakrętek, zacisków, gumowych uszczelek

Nie wrzucaj
- szyb okiennych i samochodowych
- luster
- porcelany, ceramiki
- szkła żaroodpornego
- szkła zbrojonego
- żarówek, świetlówek, kineskopów

2) English:

clear glass

dispose of
- Bottles and jars of colorless glass without nuts, clips, rubber seals

Do not throw
- Window panes and car
- mirror
- Porcelain, pottery
- Heat-resistant glass
- Glass reinforced
- Light bulbs, fluorescent lamps, cathode ray tubes

3) Polish:

Szkło Kolorowe

Wrzucaj
- butelki i słoiki ze szkła kolorowego bez nakrętek, zacisków, gumowych uszczelek

Nie wrzucaj
- szyb okiennych i samochodowych
- luster
- porcelany, ceramiki
- szkła żaroodpornego
- szkła zbrojonego
- żarówek, świetlówek, kineskopów

3) English

Colored glass

dispose of
- Bottles and jars, colored glass without nuts, clips, rubber seals

Do not throw
- Window panes and car
- mirror
- Porcelain, pottery
- Heat-resistant glass
- Glass reinforced
- Light bulbs, fluorescent lamps, cathode ray tubes

4) Polish

Papier

Wrzucaj
- gazety, czasopisma, kolo-rowe magazyny
- kartony i tekturę
- torebki i worki papierowe
- książki, prospekty, katalogi

Pamietaj
- Karton zgniec
- papier wyprostuj i złóź

Nie wrzucaj
- zabrudzonego mokrego lub tłustego papieru
- papieru woskowanego
- zdjęć
- papieru z presroczystą folią
- styropianu

4) English

paper

dispose of
- Newspapers, magazines, near-zero storage
- Cartons and cardboard
- Bags and paper bags
- Books, brochures, catalogs

remember
- Cardboard Crushing
- Flatten and fold paper

Do not throw
- Wet or greasy soiled paper
- Waxed paper
- photos
- Presroczystą foil paper
- styrofoam

Is there anything about Tetra pack drink cartons? I am assuming there are not allowed?

Thanks,
J
Sunny Girl 1 | 17
21 Mar 2013  #27
hi, the translation is good, but few words I will correct. Also Tatra pack I think is not recyclable, because they said don't throw paper with foil attached, so I guess it is what Tetra pack is all about. So here are few things that I corrected:

- pojemniki i naczynia z tworzy sztucznych
There is a mistake in Polish, should be TWORZYW
Translation:
- containter and utensils made from plastic

- zgnieć opakowanie, zakręć nakrętkę przed wrzuceniem wrzucaj czyste opakowania
Translation:
- squize packagings and then tighten the cap, clean packagings before disposing them

- szeleszczących woreczków i reklamówek
Translation:
Rustling bags and plastic bags from supermarkets

- szyb okiennych i samochodowych
Translation:
Window panes and windscreens

gazety, czasopisma, kolo-rowe magazyny, papieru z presroczystą folią
There is a mistake in Polish, should be KOLOROWE and PRZEZROCZYSTĄ
Translation:
Newspapers, magazines, colour magazines, paper with attached transparent foil
Jars777 20 | 70
10 May 2013  #28
Hello and sorry that I didn't reply to you for ages. Thank you soo much for your correction.

I have now posted the instructions up for anyone else to read them on my blog:
the-fields.de/?p=1313

Thanks again
J
jl5501 2 | 4
6 Jun 2013  #29
Merged: Obtaining correct wheelie bins in Gdansk

Hello

When you live in a house in Gdansk, you need different bins for different rubbish, in order for it to be collected.

Does anyone know what the official policy is, and how to obtain the correct bins when they are not supplied

Regards
John
pawian 161 | 9,811
30 Jun 2013  #30
Merged: New rubbish collection/segregation policy in Poland from 01.07.2013

Yes, from tomorrow all Poles will have to segregate their rubbish if they want to pay lower prices for having their rubbish collected by municipal services.

I am for, of course. I have always tried to be green.

But I have some doubts.

In your countries, when you segregate, do you really wash bottles and cans before putting them into special containers??? That`s what is expected of Poles. I understand the reasons, but wasting water to wash rubbish is a bit crazy to me.


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