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I was cursing Poland daily, then returned home, but now thinking of going back..


zuczek 3 | 52
10 May 2010 #1
After cursing Poland daily for a while I was relieved to come back home. Now that has worn off and I am thinking about going back.

Why are we like that? Always imagining things are better "somewhere else"?

I guess I got used to life there and also miss some people. But immigration is such a pain in the ass...and finding a good flat with an honest landlord...ugh just thinking of all the hassle makes my back hurt.
convex 20 | 3,978
10 May 2010 #2
We're not like that. Just make the best of where you're at, find out what's most important to you, and find a place that best suits you. Everywhere has it's positives and it's negatives. I've never really been to any countries where I wouldn't want to live for a year or so.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
10 May 2010 #3
Always imagining things are better "somewhere else"?

That's not a typical Polish thing. Most ppl all across the globe have that. Nietzsche already said: "where you are not, there is your treasure" and it's true. Other places are always more exciting, more fun until you've lived there for longer than 6 months. Then you will find out that it's just a place like everywhere else in the world. Probably you will start to think by then that at home it's much better. It's just human nature, you want what you don't have and once you have it, you want either sth else or back what you had.

>^..^<

M-G (normal behaviour)
OP zuczek 3 | 52
10 May 2010 #4
It's not always that simple. Sometimes life, money, and other circumstances prevent us from being in a place that "suits" us.

I have been to plenty of places I would hate living.

That's not a typical Polish thing.

I wasn't saying it was a Polish thing...I am a Yank myself.

And actually from a practical point of view Warsaw was better for me. I hate suburban America...have to drive everywhere and things are too spread out. I preferred Warsaw's connectedness.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
10 May 2010 #5
Just make the best of where you're at

I believe this is the not-so secret philosophy for a good life.

Nietzsche

"God is dead"
Signed Nietzsche.

"Nietzsche is dead"
Signed God.

I've never really been to any countries where I wouldn't want to live for a year or so.

I have been to plenty of places I would hate living.

I broke my arm in four places and I'll never go back to those places
;D
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
10 May 2010 #6
I have been to plenty of places I would hate living.

Well, the thing only goes for places where you've been once and had a great time. Only to find that the next time you're going, it's not that great or after living there you find that it's just a place like everywhere else. I have that too.

"God is dead"
Signed Nietzsche.

Nietzsche is dead"
Signed God.

That's an old one :)

>^..^<

M-G (tiens)
OP zuczek 3 | 52
10 May 2010 #7
Well I am sure I want to go back...just can't do it right now. Also not looking forward to the immigration hoops again. Starting from scratch is always more of a pain than just extending it.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
10 May 2010 #8
curious zuczek....what were all the things you used to curse about when you lived in Poland?

i'd imagine they are all still here........waiting for your arrival.
OP zuczek 3 | 52
10 May 2010 #9
Hah yeah I am sure they are...it was just the typical stuff all expats get miffed at...ridiculous bureaucracy, horrible customer service and service in general, not being able to get a straight answer for anything, constantly changing "standards" that nobody can ever clearly explain, one kasa out of 20 open and waiting 30min in the queue that wraps around the shop etc.

But on the same note there are things I don't like about here in suburban USA...like everyone talking all the time in public about nothing and doing it LOUDLY, having to drive 30min to get anywhere, all the shops being the size of an Ikea so you have to walk for an hour to get a jug of milk, double billing for mobile phones where both parties pay for minutes used, our broken medical system that is worse than Poland's immigration system, how FAT most people are (I know that's shallow but the glutony irritates me), being asked "How are you?" by everyone you pass when they don't really give a **** and don't want you to say anything but "great and you?"....etc.

Overall the city lifestyle and way of life in Warsaw suited me better. I will go back when I can manage. I really didn't want to leave but had too much trouble renewing the karta pobytu and was just irritated at the game and gave up. My mistake.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
15 May 2010 #10
zuczek wrote:

sorry man, but that's not a very convincing list. maybe you should go back and read it again.

btw, have you ever lived in an American city.....or are you the guy too afraid to leave the suburbs.
wiktusz 1 | 9
16 May 2010 #11
Living in Poland. Really it's just a dream to me. The first time I visited Poland I realized there is more to my life. I think I just fell in love with the culture and history and the closeness of all the people. I was born in Canada but both my parents were born in Poland and moved because of the war... Sometimes you get the feeling you don't fit in and thats how I feel right now. If you ever have the opportunity to go back i would take it first chance I got. Everything just seems so much more meaningful there. You just can't explain it.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
16 May 2010 #12
Wiktusz, do you regularily get an erection just thinking about Poland? Perhaps you are Polosexual?

>^..^<

M-G (puzzled)
wiktusz 1 | 9
16 May 2010 #13
*laughs, Polosexual? what does that even mean? No don't answer that I don't even care. ;p I just have a really hardcore Polish family.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,650
16 May 2010 #14
Always imagining things are better "somewhere else"?

I am exactly the same way. It's idealism coupled with wanderlust.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
16 May 2010 #15
Living in Poland. Really it's just a dream to me.

well, then the obvious question would be, "why don't you live there?"

leave Canada, go live in Poland. it's amazing what technology provides these days. buy yourself a plane ticket, sell your car, move to Poland.

No????
wiktusz 1 | 9
16 May 2010 #16
well, then the obvious question would be, "why don't you live there?"

Because, all the close family is here. My Polish isnt even the best. It might become a reality though if I apply for university there and get in. Everything depends though.

sell your car

Yes, if I had one xD
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
17 May 2010 #17
wiktusz wrote:

It might become a reality though if I apply for university there and get in.

doesn't that kinda conflict with

Because, all the close family is here.

???

just sayin'.
Think Twice
17 May 2010 #18
the closeness of all the people.

They cheat in their own families, thats closeness ?

Everything just seems so much more meaningful there. You just can't explain it.

Bureaucracy, " meaningful " ?

if I apply for university

I don,t think you,re quite ready for uni.
OP zuczek 3 | 52
17 May 2010 #19
I am not really sure what fuzzywickets is on about with his "that's not much of a list and maybe you should read it again"....well bite me it's MY list. Keep your suggestions to yourself next time buddy.

I got used to people kind of leaving me be in public (except for the random grandma lecturing someone on their clothing or choice of beer). In the US people are way too intrusive for me. Always talking and asking questions. They (we) are incapable of being around other people and not talking to fill the silence. I hate that and it is really irritating me since I have been back.

Poles are friendly in private and kind of rude often in public but looking back the only time that really bothered me was when it came to customer service. Generally whilst moving around day to day it was a plus. Less small talk.

Anyway I will go back when I can.
wiktusz 1 | 9
17 May 2010 #20
???

just sayin'.

I have my ways. I just have to do some convincing.

They cheat in their own families, thats closeness ?

Every country has divorces and family issues.

Bureaucracy, " meaningful " ?

No the culture and tradtions.

I don,t think you,re quite ready for uni.

Definitly not yet.
richasis 1 | 420
23 May 2010 #21
Our situation (parents) is very similar as is our love for Poland. I just couldn't stand the thought of never returning.

Sometimes you get the feeling you don't fit in and thats how I feel right now. .

Again, I know exactly how you feel. Like you, I never felt as though I fit in here in USA - even before seeing Poland.

But yes, visiting Poland for me was a truly profound experience. It was a homecoming of sorts - I'll move there soon.
Thanks for sharing your thoughts. For me, your words particularly ring true. I hope you do make your way to Poland.

Good Luck and See You There! :)
Raiany
18 Mar 2011 #22
Heh I'm not polish either but I always spend my holidays in Poland. It's just magic. All the art in the streets (specially in Cracow), the way people are are. I must say I agree with the threadstarter: polish people are more sincere. They won't tell you they miss you if they don't, just for the sake of doing it. They won't say their life is great when it's not and it just pisses me off so much when americans go like "HEYY HOW R YA?? ALL GOOD?"

I mean, does that even mean something? aren't people supposed to say things that actually make a difference?

just my mind..
;))
18 Mar 2011 #23
I get really mad if people talk about Polska in a bad way. I mean, the streets are way cleaner than in the US, at least the places I've visited. They tend to know many languages (I was amazed by how good english many poles can speak since thats not what the word has), the streets just give you this sense that you're walking where princes and princesses did (does anyone else get that feeling?).

Since I've first been to Poland, years ago, I never saw any violence or disrespect. Poles seem to be less violent from nature. I mean, even their cloth style seems to be more "honest". You'll meet many people who are into fashion but most have this very unique way of dressing that just says they are good people to me. Good in a way that doesn't care about the midia that much, that doesn't need it to be ok (people are so crazy about looking good in America, God...)

One thing I disliked about Poland is the amount of alcohol people will drink. It's not like they're gonna do stupid things but they just drink so much.. and they are very strong with the licker. To summ up in Poland you'll meet people who love to read a book in a nice cafe, to talk about arts and literature (specially if you meet people from human universities such as Uniwersytet Jagiellonski) but you'll also meet people who can only talk about parties (you won't have problems finding good pubs in Poland) and vodka.

Anyway, I just miss it so much I wanna go back there whenever I can. The culture, their minds. The trams, the kielbasas (is that how its written?), the parks, the "Dzien Dobry"...
horsey - | 3
30 Jun 2011 #24
What amuses me is people who claim a country is great on the basis of having spent some holidays there. News flash: when you are holidaying it is possible to have a good time in Kazachstan, Siberia or anywhere else really. Try living and working in Poland for a couple of years then write another post with your reflections.

It is a country that cares little or none for it's citizens, electing to structure it's laws so as to keep the majority on or just above the poverty line. It is a country with a healthcare system that fails the most vulnerable - children, the elderly and those of a low socio-economic status. It is a country that discourages free enterprise by placing impossibly high taxes and levies on business owners and employers - creating a huge and corrupt black market for employment. It is a country that continually fails children by electing to take them away from strugling parents and dump them in violence-ruled orphanages in preference to helping families stay together. It is a country that controlls trade via bribes and mafia connections. It is a country that swiftly disposes of politicians who will not walk the line.

I could go on and on if you are interested, and give you plenty of hair-raising examples to illustrate each of the points above. I've spent several years living in Poland on and off and had first-hand contact with ministries, customs, healthcare and education. What I have seen sometimes keeps me awake at night. Life is too short to spend it in Poland. Never again. I still own property there and even that will continue to be administered (and eventually sold) by proxy as I have no time to waste on ever travelling there again. There are better places in the world to see.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
30 Jun 2011 #25
Horsey, it's quite true that they don't care much for their citizens but Poland very much has a 'lesser of two evils' political set-up. PO are here to stay for quite some time, I'd say. Taxes are ridiculously high, that's true. To think that Tusk gave this a lot of consideration, lol.

Living is really difficult here for many people. They point to salary increases but they are minimal, truth be told. Nothing compared to spiralling inflation. Also, your money is forcibly swiped through insurance and DSS payments. I'd rather save 890PLN a month but I've been reliably informed that I'm contributing to my pension here. Will I ever see it? Who knows?!
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
30 Jun 2011 #26
give you plenty of hair-raising examples to illustrate each of the points above.

Well, I one for one would be interested in the examples, and I want them hair-raising (i.e., they must be more shocking than what I see and hear about in the UK on a daily basis). Deal?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
30 Jun 2011 #27
The majority of people I know are well above the poverty line. Perhaps you chose to spend your entire time in poverty-stricken former PGR areas, but that's not how most people live.

It is a country with a healthcare system that fails the most vulnerable - children, the elderly and those of a low socio-economic status.

Have you used the health care system in Poland? I doubt it, otherwise you'd know that the system does work - with the usual problems that universal healthcare has.

It is a country that discourages free enterprise by placing impossibly high taxes and levies on business owners and employers - creating a huge and corrupt black market for employment.

Impossibly high? My taxation is 32% plus 850zl a month - and that's as high as it can go. On average, with deductions, it comes to around 25% plus 850zl - not a bad deal by any standard. It's certainly far lower than many other countries. Again - clearly basing it on what you've read on some forum, not the truth.

Violence-ruled orphanages? Clearly fantasizing again. The system here actually does try to keep families together - orphanages are very much a "last resort" in a country which can't afford to pay hundreds of zloty a week to professional 'foster' parents.

So, in other words, you worked for some Callan school in the middle of nowhere and are now exceptionally bitter because you agreed to a terrible contract?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
30 Jun 2011 #28
The feelings of the OP are typical of many Poles and it stems from romanticising their own country too much. They return from the UK to see Poland how they'd like it to be but are disappointed in the reality they are confronted with. The grass is always greener on the other side, they say.
Monia
30 Jun 2011 #29
Horsey - if you are so full of bitter criticism about Poland`s own experiences why did you join this forum ? If you keep on reading comments posted here will deepen your frustration and your nightmares about being in Poland again will come back . If I were you I would never mention a word Poland or anything related to this low, poverty stricken country, where everything sucks . Are you kind of masochist ?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
30 Jun 2011 #30
She joined to discuss her experiences, Monia. What do you think a forum is about? It's also called getting things off your chest and sharing what you encounter in life.


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