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Canadian Moving to Poznan, Poland - what to bring over, areas to avoid, school for a child.


Melis 2 | 17
21 Nov 2014 #1
Hello fellow bloggers,

I was wondering if you could please give me some advice. My husband has been accepted into Dentistry program at the PUM and so we will be moving most likely July of 2015 to give ourselves time to settle before he starts studying. With that being said we are drastically changing our life, selling our house packing our stuff and shipping it to Poznan when the time comes.

Could you please advise me as to what I should definitely bring over that I will not find in Poznan? I know that the whole artifacts (tv, mixes, blow dryers) will be an issue bc of the voltage but im still willing to bring certain things if they will not fry out an cause a fire lol.

Also I do not speak a lick of Polish which I know will be another issue (I am planning on taking classes as soon as possible) but regardless of my lack of Polish I would like to find a job as soon as possible as well, I am willing to wash dishes if I have to. Do you think finding a job will be a major issue? apart from english I am fluent in Spanish.

When looking for apartments what areas should I avoid?
Lastly I'd like some advice in regards to schools for children. I have a 2 year old and would like to know if schooling is like here in canada where they begin junior kindergarten at the age of 4. I was planning on putting him in a regular Polish school when the time comes any advice or word of experience in regards to foreigners sending their children to full on Polish school? I definitely do not want to pay 15k a year for english school. The whole point of this experience is for my son to embrace his heritage and learn a new language.

If you can think of any other points I would much appreciate it.

thank you in advanced!
Monitor 14 | 1,820
21 Nov 2014 #2
I am not a blogger, but I can try answering few of your questions.

I am willing to wash dishes if I have to.

You will need to know at least basic Polish for that.

Do you think finding a job will be a major issue? apart from english I am fluent in Spanish.

If you decide to be a part time English teacher, then probably not. (As long as you have work permit)

In Poland schools are regional, so only if you rent apartment in given neighborhood your son will be able to learn in school located there.

Fast googling shows me this website:
goldenline.pl/grupy/Miasta_regiony/poznan2/dobra-szkola-podstawowa-w-poznaniu,1186942

Somebody suggests following primary schools: "na Rawickiej (Świerczewo), 70 na Pięknej (Ogrody) i 38 na Brandstaettera (Cytadela)"

There are also private schools teaching in Polish, definitely cheaper than English language schools. But IMHO good public is good enough if you don't have too much money.

Use translate.google.com for reading Polish websites.
OP Melis 2 | 17
21 Nov 2014 #3
Thank you Monitor for responding to my post. I will definitely take a look at those schools.
sgrzes
21 Nov 2014 #4
Hi Mellis,

I bet you won't need to dishwash for living. The Native english speakers are in demand here, if it was in Warsaw we could talk about getting you some trial lessons. We're using a native speaker from Ireland for our 2 kids and we pay him 60 PLN p/h. We moved here 10 years ago from US so we know how painfull it is. If you need advice on some shipping please let me know at sgrzes@hotmail. Also I can advice on accomodation as my wife is in Real Estate business.
sobieski 107 | 2,128
21 Nov 2014 #5
I would aim for BPO companies, who always are recruiting multilingual staff (and where Polish is not necessary)
OP Melis 2 | 17
21 Nov 2014 #6
Good Day to you all,

thank you for taking the time and posting. There are a few more questions I have. In regards to renting or purchasing property. We are debating whether it is worth buying an apartment for the 5 years that we will be there because how hard it might be to sell once we are ready to move back. Any suggestions?

Also in regards to me working will I be able to receive the benefits of a maternity leave? Our plan is to eventually get pregnant once we are established there. Are there any benefits that the government provides (my fellow canadians might understand this....beneifts like the baby bonus or the universal tax).

@sgrzes: Thank you for your response. For some reason I was really under the impression that there were soo many natives applying for english tutoring/teaching that i had no chance so with that being said I had crossed out that job from my list. I will however be bringing material (Kumon quality) just in case I do have the opportunity to teach english. I do need to put it out there that I do not have a degree. I have two years of college in interior design/architectural technology which im sure will not serve for anything.Unless someone is interested in me being their personal interior decorator :)

@sobieski: I will look up such companies as you mentioned. thank you.
Monitor 14 | 1,820
21 Nov 2014 #7
If you don't have better ways of investing money than 5 - 6% per year interests, then it's not bad idea. But the appartment cannot be too big, because it's harder to sell bigger apartments.

Also in regards to me working will I be able to receive the benefits of a maternity leave?

Yes, but you must be employed wit "Umowa o pracę"
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urlop_macierzy%C5%84ski

Are there any benefits that the government provides (my fellow canadians might understand this....beneifts like the baby bonus or the universal tax).

If any then it's small money.

I was really under the impression that there were soo many natives applying for english tutoring/teaching that i had no chance so with that being said

That's true, so in a bad case you will be working part time.

Once again, will you have work permit? Because as a Canadian you have no right to work in Poland. I am not sure if as a wife of a foreign student you can, but probably no.
OP Melis 2 | 17
21 Nov 2014 #8
@Monitor: In regards to a working visa, I would like to apply for one as soon as possible. I spoke with the Polish Consulate here in Toronto and they said that the only way I can apply is once I find employment in Poland and they can provide me with a letter of employment. Which is why im willing to work as a diswasher, cleaning lady etc. :) I'm very hands on so whatever I can find that doesn't require me speak Polish i'm willing to try it. I know I will have to learn Polish eventually, but to begin with it would be easier to find something more accommodating

.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
21 Nov 2014 #9
Regarding the TV, it's not just the voltage. It needs to be a very modern one with the ability to switch to PAL systems and the Polish PAL system at that, not the UK PAL system (or there will be no audio). US TVs and AV equipt are usually NTSC aren't they, not PAL.
jon357 69 | 18,360
21 Nov 2014 #10
Probably better to buy one in PL - they aren't expensive.

Also in regards to me working will I be able to receive the benefits of a maternity leave?

Yes

Our plan is to eventually get pregnant once we are established there. Are there any benefits that the government provides (my fellow canadians might understand this....beneifts like the baby bonus or the universal tax).

Not really. Certainly not like you're used to over there unfortunately.
Monitor 14 | 1,820
22 Nov 2014 #11
It is very unlikely that somebody will bother to apply for your work permit if you will not present some exeptional skills. So don't count on legal work as a cleaner. Also work permit is for this only job, so if you will want to change it for a better one, you will be treated as person without work permit again. So even work as an English teacher may be not available for you as you will face competition of British native speakers who don't need work permit.
OP Melis 2 | 17
22 Nov 2014 #12
Thanks everyone for the responses. It leaves me with a lot to think about. I think we've concluded that we won't be buying any property for the time we will be there. We will be purchasing a vehicle for sure and we won't be taking any of our tvs. I still plan on bringing my kitchen aid mixer and food processor and kind of treat like the lottery if it works then great if not ill just keep it stored. BY any chance does anyone know if the Kitchen aid mixers and Cuisinart food processors work over there? I feel so attached to them and I'm aware that they are ridiculously expensive in Poland like 2x the price here.

It looks like I'll be screwed with work. Hopefully i'll be lucky enough to find someone that can provide me with that letter.
pigsy 7 | 305
22 Nov 2014 #13
Yeah the power voltage is different and so are the plugs until you want to bring enough power converters or switch one to all appliances.oh and they tend to go kapoot soon as well.
lateStarter 2 | 45
23 Nov 2014 #14
I bought a transformer before we moved to Poland so my wife could continue to use her juicer and so far, no problems. TV, just but one here.
Monitor 14 | 1,820
23 Nov 2014 #15
You can buy transformers in Polish website: allegro.pl
Mind that its maximum power must be larger than device which you want to connect to it.
OP Melis 2 | 17
24 Nov 2014 #16
Thanks for the tip guys, I will try to find those converters before I leave here.
moniq
24 Nov 2014 #17
Hi Melis,

I am polish, living in Poznan and I'll try to help you briefly:

what is your occupation?
People write here it is not so easy to get a teaching job? Well...when I was at school - english native speakers were not common...and I know they still aren't.

I would try different international companies, where english is the company's language (glaxosmithkline, SABmiller, Bridgestone,Volkswagen,etc), possibly secretary/administration jobs, or companies which trade with North America?

In worst cage - there are some companies like "Arvato" and they always need natives for customer services.
Don't give up looking for a job!! Polish gov. is too poor to provide you appropriate support.

Areas to avoid- fortunately there are no slums or gangs where ppl run with guns ;-)
Just be carefull about drunken ppl sitting days and nights in front of "monopoly shops" (=small supermarket + bottle shop).

I look from a different perspective, so don't know much about work permit, but the social benefical system....sucks entirely!!
It would be much better for you if you manage to get any beneficials from Canada transferred/relocated to Poland (it is at least possible within the European Union).

I wouldn't bother about a school (it starts with the age of 6 and is almost free) except you choose a private english school. I bet, one or two years and you child knows polish perfectly.

Poznan is a student city, so go for different forums (couchsurfing meetings), your husband uni envinronment, so you are not that alone in a new country!

Wish you good luck!!
(I wanted to move to Canada ones - but this visa/work permit circus is too much for me;-) )
OP Melis 2 | 17
27 Nov 2014 #18
Thank you Moniq for your very informative and detailed response!! I appreciate you taking your time. I will definitely be calling those companies and checking with them.

In regards to working visas, I've got a different route I might be taking. I have an appointment with the Hungarian consulate. It seems I may qualify for a Hungarian Passport. (My grandfather was hungarian) Hopefully all runs smoothly and I am able to get it.

Moniq it is never too late to try and come over to Canada!

Merged: What products to bring over from Canada that I wont be able to find in Poznan

Hi there,
I was wondering if any fellow Canadians living in Poland could please advise me as to what products (mostly food related or anything will be fine) you recommend for me to stock up on prior to moving to Poznan. We will be shipping all of our belongings over since we are moving to Poznan for 5 years. I figure i'd take advantage and stock up on fav. treats, certain condiments....advil...tylenol..batteries etc. If you could give me some feedback so we can prepare ourselves it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance :)
Looker - | 1,102
25 Feb 2015 #19
Maple Syrup is here quite expensive in Poland, and the best is Canadian of course. In Canada is also a greater choice of good coffee and real cocoa. Vanilla in various forms - from powder, by sticks, pellets, the liquid extract - not easily available in Poland. Greater choice of exotic fruits and a little better dairy products.

Apart from what I mentioned above, the food in Poland is still better than on the American continent - more healthy and a lot cheaper.
OP Melis 2 | 17
26 Feb 2015 #20
Thank you soo much for the suggestion I will definitely make sure to stock up.
Macowiec
27 Feb 2015 #21
The worst thing about Poland (coming from Canada) is that you cannot buy Coffee Crisps here!
OP Melis 2 | 17
4 Jun 2015 #22
Hello Everyone,

We will be moving to Poznan next month, I cannot believe how time has flown by. I was wondering if any of you could suggest a a school where I may be able to learn basic Polish. ( I'm freaking out bc I'm moving there and can't speak the language at all).

Are there any centers where immigrants can go an maybe receive some sort of guidance with job searching etc? I know that it's going to be super hard to work there at all not being able to speak the language, but even if I could find something part time that would be great.

Lastly, I have 2 1/2 year old active little boy, i'm interested in putting him soccer...martial arts any sort of activity, can any of you recommend places for his age group? I was even considering putting him in daycare just so he can learn polish as well as meet other children. Can anyone recommend any daycares in Poznan.

Thanks in advanced!
jestespalant
4 Jun 2015 #23
" Are there any centers where immigrants can go an maybe receive some sort of guidance with job searching "

You must understand Poland is not set up for immigration like some of the western countries like Netherlands or UK.
There will be no assistance, and no chance of finding a job without speaking the language well.
Other than teaching English that is....and you will need teaching qualification to do that.
I think putting your child in daycare is a good idea, he will just learn the language easily that way.
Gosc123456
4 Jun 2015 #24
@Jestespalant: to teach English not only qualifcations but also (since person is not from EU) a work permit are demanded so best not to count on that.

100% ok with you! Poland is not an immigration country but rather an emigration country and therefore no help whatsoever to foreigners coming to Poland (common sense). The rare foreigners being in Poland on their own (= not those with expat contracts from their home countries) have to manage on their own. It is not easy specially if no knowledge of the language but nobody forces foreigners to move to Poland. If too hard, they just stay at home (and it's the same situation everywhere). Poland does not spoon feed...
jestespalant
4 Jun 2015 #25
'Poland does not spoon feed' yes I know that but I do not think OP does.
Good grief - Poland cannot even look after its own, let alone more!
lucky for the thousands - or is it milliions - of Polish emigrants that other countries do 'spoonfeed' isnt it?! I bet they are lapping it up.
kpc21 1 | 763
4 Jun 2015 #26
Regarding the TV, it's not just the voltage. It needs to be a very modern one with the ability to switch to PAL systems and the Polish PAL system at that, not the UK PAL system (or there will be no audio). US TVs and AV equipt are usually NTSC aren't they, not PAL.

PAL? PAL is no longer used in Poland, since 2013 (except for the analog packets of cable TV and a few small local TV stations, the last of which switched to DVB-T this year). A TV set must support DVB-T with MPEG-4 compression and HDTV signal to receive TV in Poland.
OP Melis 2 | 17
4 Jun 2015 #27
Thank you for your responses. I didn't want to be ignorant and assume right away that there would be no centers like we have here in Canada. I've lived in Peru for 3 years so I understand how living in a 3rd world country works. Not saying that Poland is one because I'm sure it is doing way better than Peru's current situation. I figured that I'd just ask in case.

I'm currently working on getting my Hungarian citizenship so that I may be able to have a EU passport and therefore make it easy for if I do find some sort of job.

I wouldn't want to teach English whatsoever. I don't have teaching qualifications anyways.
Like I've mentioned before, my husband will be studying in Poznan for 5 years at PUMS. We've budgeted enough knowing that we most likely won't be working there.

There is always hope that I may be able to work part time and bring in some sort income even if it's to cover food expenses.

Can anyone suggest a where I may be able to study the Polish language. Even conversational Polish?
Lmnop
22 Aug 2015 #28
How is life in Poznan going Melis?
OP Melis 2 | 17
25 Aug 2015 #29
It's going good so far. A bit of a culture shock. We arrived when there was that heat wave going on so I must say it was a tough first week adjusting to no Air conditioning at home lol. I have to say polish is one of the hardest languages ever!!!! Overall it's going well. Thank you so much for asking
majkel - | 64
25 Aug 2015 #30
Hi Melis! If it's not too much to ask, I'd appreciate a longer post :) Maybe a blog? :)


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