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Bringing my best American friend to Poland.


BigChild 1 | 1
1 Jun 2010 #1
I was born in Poland, but I moved here at a very young age. We speak Polish and do "Polish" things. Over time I have kinda "Americanized", to the point that people only know i'm polish because of my last name. I have known my friend for around 10 years, and we've been hanging out for a long time.

My parents are trying to ship me off to Poland this summer, and I asked if I could bring a friend. Honestly, it has always been a dream of mine to show a friend how life is over there. When I asked them they kinda laughed and ignored it until they realized I was serious. I talked to my friend and he said that he would love to go. He's openminded and I know he would love it here.

I found a list of "problems" that kinda rain on my parade.

-I would be living over there with my Grandpa. Don't get me wrong he's a freaking cool dude, but I don't know how he would react to having an American there.

- I don't know how he would react to graffiti and general ruin that's sometimes over there. Like we would get off the train and he would wanna pee and he would see that it would cost 2 dollars. :0

- His parents are kinda over protective, I don't know how they would react to just me and him going there without my parents.

- The price of a ticket there is CRAZY. I looked around and I saw anything from 1100-1800 $!! I would say he's an upper class kid, but for a trip that seems crazy.

-Culture shock for him. I wouldn't want him to get bored and want to go home.

-Food. To be honest, I'm a picky eater and I'm not really a fan of Polish food, I don't hate it, but I wouldn't pass up a piece of pizza lol. I don't know if he would hate the food there. I mean there's a burger stand there and pizza etc, just don't know...

- I'm extremly fearful of how my Polish family over there would react to an American. AWKWARD!

Here are some good reasons why we should go

- I'm finishing up my last year of school next year and then friendships kinda die off as college starts.

- He's a REALLY good friend of mine.

- Show him life over there and how different it is.

- It would be F#@%ing awesome. I live in the center of a town and theres a town square, park, indoor pool center, soccer fields, basketball hoops, etc. It would be the best summer ever.

Any thoughts on how this could work and anyone have any experience of this? I would LOVE to somehow convince his and my parents.
Wroclaw Boy
1 Jun 2010 #2
IMO most of what youve listed is whats great about travelling ie. you need to embrace the cultural differences.

Dont worry, i always say with things like this the worst mistake you can make is not to try, that is unless he has something better planned.

Ohh yeh just be sure to tell your mate not to run around shouting his mouth off like many Americans do when abroad.
frd 7 | 1,401
1 Jun 2010 #3
Oh come on food? It's not Egypt you're not gonna puke your guts out after eating something bought at an outside stall. I agree with WB, and it's part of discovering the culture - trying out things that are different from what you usually have.

I'm pretty sure you can see graffiti in US too, as are poorer districts and ruined places where industry died off, nothing new there. Peeing for 2$ where did you take that price from? I'm pretty sure Poland is a very inexpensive country from anyone from US.

As for culture shock - isn't it more like being scared of too much new stuff then being bored? He would be bored if everything was the same. And he might be bored if you gonna take him to some smalltown or a village. I'm pretty sure you'd like to take him to Krakow, Wroclaw, Warsaw or Tricity..
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595
1 Jun 2010 #4
Just talk with everyone who would be involved in this project. Then you will soon know whether it's possible or not.

Most of it depends on your friend and his family. If they want/allow this.

Polish people in general don't have anything against Americans.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
2 Jun 2010 #5
I found a list of "problems" that kinda rain on my parade.

Let things happen. Spontaneity is always more fun.

Ohh yeh just be sure to tell your mate not to run around shouting his mouth off like many Americans do when abroad.

Be yourselves. Americans are loud. It's what the Euros expect, don't disappoint them.
Wroclaw Boy
2 Jun 2010 #6
Oh come on food? It's not Egypt you're not gonna puke your guts out after eating something bought at an outside stall.

Food is one of the best things about Poland.

You would think hes talking about a third world country the way he listed issues though, i think the trip would do you both good.

Americans are loud. It's what the Euros expect, don't disappoint them.

Apart from the fact that we Euros dislike that and its rude as hell in public places advertise that youre a wealthy foreigner if you like.
pawian 197 | 19,971
16 Oct 2019 #7
- I'm extremly fearful of how my Polish family over there would react to an American. AWKWARD!

You should confer with them as long as neccessary to dissipate their doubts. Yes, hosting an American at home is a very unusual situation, not all people are able to cope with all that stress and discomfort. Try to explain to them that most Americans are just like us and they don`t pose any real danger.


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