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Is it a 'big deal' to wish Happy Easter in Poland?


1172ftj 6 | 17
28 Mar 2013 #1
Hi, I just wanted to know if it is common in Poland to wish a "Happy Easter" or not? I was talking to my uncles neighbor through Facebook since Wszyscy Swieci but we haven't talked in a month+. As an occasion to start talking to her I was going to wish her a happy Easter. I would really rather she started talking to me though since the last few times we talked they were from me talking to her first. Thanks! :)
zlotnicki - | 4
28 Mar 2013 #2
Who cares? Everyone is tired of it, every year the same annoying thing Polish do, give it up already, do us all a favour.
Paulina 10 | 1,900
28 Mar 2013 #3
As an occasion to start talking to her I was going to wish her a happy Easter.

I guess it would be OK to wish her happy Easter on Facebook (unless she's an atheist, then it won't make much sense).

give it up already

No :)

do us all a favour

Why don't you do us all a favour and leave Poland, eh? o_O
poland_
28 Mar 2013 #4
Who cares? Everyone is tired of it, every year the same annoying thing Polish do, give it up already, do us all a favour.

Tradition is the glue of all good families. Respect your neighbors traditions and they will break their bread with you.
smurf 39 | 1,981
28 Mar 2013 #5
Yea, it's common, it's also the most boring of all holidays.
Paulina 10 | 1,900
28 Mar 2013 #6
youtube.com/watch?v=FsqJFIJ5lLs

lol

:)
Bieganski 17 | 896
28 Mar 2013 #7
Who cares? Everyone is tired of it, every year the same annoying thing Polish do, give it up already, do us all a favour.

Exactly. Every year the same annoying things like Pesach, Chanukah, Yom Kippur, and Rosh Hashana. Get rid of it all.
smurf 39 | 1,981
28 Mar 2013 #8
:)

Hahaa, good one :)

Pesach, Chanukah, Yom Kippur, and Rosh Hashana

I've no idea what any of these things are, they look religious so I don't care either.
OP 1172ftj 6 | 17
28 Mar 2013 #9
Thanks all :) my family is Polish as well but it has been ages since we've moved, hoping I will be able to visit one day soon :D

youtube

lol thank you for that XD
WielkiPolak 58 | 1,024
28 Mar 2013 #10
(unless she's an atheist, then it won't make much sense).

I'm pretty sure I have heard many an atheist wish each other Happy Easter where I live. They just say it without thinking.

I am a Catholic but even I get a little tired of the traditional celebration of Easter. I will go to Church on Good Friday and I will go on Easter Sunday but I used to be told I can't do anything that will bring me any remote happiness from Friday till Sunday as I should be reflecting on the sadness. It ended up with me just sitting around the house rather board, hoping for Easter to end [Easter is a pagan name for the Christian holiday by the way].

Lent as well. Jesus had to go 40 days, once. Why do we have to give something up every year? I don't bother now, otherwise it would just be the same stuff, like chocolate or some crap. This year I have given up looking at the KKK site.
Lenka 3 | 2,677
28 Mar 2013 #11
I'm pretty sure I have heard many an atheist wish each other Happy Easter where I live. They just say it without thinking.

It's not about not thinking but about customs and wanting to say something nice to others
WielkiPolak 58 | 1,024
28 Mar 2013 #12
Yeah not thinking. I would say following old customs without really understanding why you are is essentially doing something without thinking. You just do it, because people do that, so you act like a sheep, just cause, you might as well and why question the tradition.
Lenka 3 | 2,677
28 Mar 2013 #13
I like Christmass not because it's a religious tradition but a cultural one as well. The same is with Easter. I know what lies behind it but I'm an atheist so I don't follow the religious part.
Nickidewbear 23 | 584
29 Mar 2013 #14
Exactly. Every year the same annoying things like Pesach, Chanukah, Yom Kippur, and Rosh Hashana. Get rid of it all.

I frankly like them.

Why don't you do us all a favour and leave Poland, eh? o_O

:-)
siuskowysiusiak - | 1
29 Mar 2013 #15
Hi, I just wanted to know if it is common in Poland to wish a "Happy Easter" or not?

What a question, don't you know Poland is a very religious country with very strong Catholic traditions? I think that much foreigners would know. The answer to your question is big "Yes!"
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
27 Mar 2016 #16
Merged: HAPPY EASTER TO ALL!

Chrystus zmartwychwstał - Prawdziwie zmartwychwstał ! Alleluja!
Христос Воскрес! - Воїстину Воскрес!
smurf 39 | 1,981
27 Mar 2016 #17
Chrystus zmartwychwstał

edited
Hope you aren't eating eggs since they're a remnants of the pagan festival which the Christians rebranded :)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
27 Mar 2016 #18
eating eggs

Święcone (Easter breakfast) begins with sharing wedges of eggs sprinkled with salt & pepper all blessed at church on Holy Saturday.
Eggs in other form are also consumed at this festive time -- my favorite or hot stuffed eggs in shells, seasoend with salt. pepper and chopped dill. Deeeelicious!
cms 9 | 1,255
27 Mar 2016 #19
Thanks for the wishes Polonius
Lyzko 30 | 7,577
27 Mar 2016 #20
Easter is for sure a "big deal" for Poles, although in a more ceremonial, less auspiciously celebretory mode than for Latinos:-)
Poles I've met in Greenpoint especially tend to be rather solemn on Easter Sunday, almost clannishly savoring the festivities for themselves and warily suspicious, particularly of non-Christian outsiders, who may wish to observe aka "intrude" on their most private (and beautiful) celebrations!
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
27 Mar 2016 #21
more ceremonial

My own feeling is that Latinos (Mexicans, Cubans, Spaniards, etc.) try to turn everything into a big show or funfest. But shouldn't there also be a time for solemnity, dignity, meditation and taking stock of oneself? The Poles IMHO strike a balance betweent the two extremes. On Holy Saturday there were not only throngs blessing Easter food and praying at the Lord'sTomb tableaux, but also long queues of penitents waiting to go to confession. That is beautiful!
Crow 148 | 9,398
27 Mar 2016 #22
big deal or not, i congratulate to all who celebrate. Happy Easter to Polish sisters and brothers!
dolnoslask 6 | 3,074
27 Mar 2016 #23
Thanks crow, yeah its a big deal.
Crow 148 | 9,398
27 Mar 2016 #24
i know that :)
dolnoslask 6 | 3,074
27 Mar 2016 #25
Though I may be off topic, My thoughts and prayers are with the Christians of Pakistan murdered for celebrating Easter today 69 dead hundreds injured, again we turn our cheek against those who only have hate in their hearts.

God bless Poland and keep her people safe.
johnny reb 30 | 5,622
27 Mar 2016 #26
yeah its a big deal.

I would say !
Without it Christians could not inherit the Kingdom of God the Father Almighty for eternity.
I would say that it is the BIGGEST DEAL of a life time.
smurf 39 | 1,981
28 Mar 2016 #27
edited

unwillingly edited I'll add :D :D :D

Święcone (Easter breakfast) begins with sharing wedges of eggs sprinkled with salt & pepper all blessed at church on Holy Saturday.

That has nothing to do with what I said, indeed it just reinforces the fact that the Christians lifeted the traditions from earlier so-called 'pagan' religions
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
28 Mar 2016 #28
from earlier so-called 'pagan

All nascent religions to a lesser or greater extent incorporate the practices and customs of their predecessors. That is nothing new. Chrsitiniaty was an imrpovement on Judaeism but also included elements of modified Graeco-Roman customs.
Lyzko 30 | 7,577
29 Mar 2016 #29
According to our local Polish daily (now weekly paper), Easter is thought to be the most important of the Christian celebrations for Poles, as it symbolizes death (śmierć), resurrection (zmartchwystanie), renewal and, above all, hope (nadziei).


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