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What does an american citizen need to do to live in Poland with his Polish citizen wife?


Bluesview 2 | 2
20 Jun 2012 #1
Hello,

My fiancee recently visited me in America from Poland. While she was here we got married. Now I want to move to Poland and live with her. What will I need to do? I don't know where to start. Also, I know we will be needing to have documents translated from English to Polish. Is it better to do this in Poland or should I have it done here in the states? What should I expect to pay? Lastly, should I consider using an attorney to handle this move or would that be a waste of money?

Thanks in advance,

Terry
MoOli 9 | 483
20 Jun 2012 #2
My friend go to Poland,get your birth certificate translated and marriage certificate translated(By a certified translator),then register both at your respective municipal office and obtain a polish version then go to immigration office and apply for a residence permit..that you can stay there over 90 days...you will have to fill form and polish style pics attached with it, & a bank statement and a proof of place to live.AND WAIT:)Once you get 1 or 2 yr permit hunt for a living:)ie.if you have money buy commercial places to rent(u will need permission to buy commercial places from interior ministry but is easy and takes around cpl of months if u on top of it...and or if you dont have money look for english teaching job as most brits and american backpackers do:).If you need more asst email me POLCIAQQ@aol.com.

What should I expect to pay? Lastly, should I consider using an attorney to handle this move or would that be a waste of money?

Sorry forgot to add...u dont need attorney to fill out forms just common sense and a smiley face with the officials and they will guide you through...there are law firms who will charge yopu arm and length for filling forms...and do that in Poland not in states the Polish embassy will just jerk u around!
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
20 Jun 2012 #3
good advice thus far.

getting zameldowanie i remember being a little tricky, you have to prove to poland you have a reason for being there.

getting a job beforehand will make your process easier.

oh, and try and apply for the residency permit (karta pubytu) before your 45th day in country. i've seen enough americans apply beyond that period (88th day) without any hangups but it's written somewhere in polish law land that it needs to be before your 45th day so plan on doing it accordingly.
scottie1113 7 | 898
20 Jun 2012 #4
oh, and try and apply for the residency permit (karta pubytu) before your 45th day in country. i've seen enough americans apply beyond that period (88th day) without any hangups

And I've seen some who were totally SOL if they didn't apply well before day 45. Take no chances and make this a priority.
Harry
20 Jun 2012 #5
good advice thus far.

Not really. For example, going to the municipal office to register one's birth certificate would be a completely useless waste of time. At best it would result in utter confusion.

getting zameldowanie i remember being a little tricky, you have to prove to poland you have a reason for being there.

Not at all. You have to prove that you have legal title of some form to the place where you will reside. Trying to prove to the staff at that office you have a reason for being in Poland would be a waste of time (they frankly don't care at all if you have a maldunek or not)

Now I want to move to Poland and live with her. What will I need to do? I don't know where to start.

First work out where you will live and then consider how you will put food on the table. Once you have an idea about that, we can help more.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
20 Jun 2012 #6
Not really. For example, going to the municipal office to register one's birth certificate would be a completely useless waste of time. At best it would result in utter confusion.

I had to have mine translated but this is years ago and as we all know, can be city or even office specific. go to one, go to another, you're sure to get conflicting information.

Not at all. You have to prove that you have legal title of some form to the place where you will reside.

my residency card was contingent upon having employment to support myself (they wanted a work "promise", i.e., useless Polish work contract) and zameldowanie is often times not granted to a tenant if you're a stranger. my first apartment, the landlord absolutely refused and I had to take, let's just say other measures, to get one. sure, he's staying with his wife but if they get an apartment on their own that she doesn't own herself, he'll be in the same situation, the landlord needs to agree to give him zameldowanie, and many don't want to due to the legalities.
Harry
20 Jun 2012 #7
I had to have mine translated but this is years ago and as we all know, can be city or even office specific.

He will almost certainly need his birth certificate for the Karta Pobytu application but it won't need to registered with or even shown to the Gmina.

my residency card was contingent upon having employment to support myself (they wanted a work "promise", i.e., useless Polish work contract)

Some are, it will depend what reason you give for getting the card. It is best to not have it linked to the need to have a job as that will probably result in them giving only a one-year card with the excuse that your job contract and/or work permit is only good for one year.
OP Bluesview 2 | 2
21 Jun 2012 #8
Thanks to everyone.for your responses. I've now got a starting place. As for needing a place to live and money... my wife owns a flat and we will live there initially. Hoping to move to a larger flat in the future though. She has a job and I receive Social Security Disability from the U.S. The reason I'm giving for the residency is to live with my wife. Selling the house in the U.S. and that money will go towards a flat later. My wife has certified copies of the marriage license (U.S.) that she will has translated. By the way... she says she thinks they can be translated to Polish for $15zl per document. Not sure if she meant per 'document' or per 'page' I'm thinking page. I'm going to send for copies of my birth certificate here and send them to her for translation.

So, I'll work on getting my residency permit (karta pubytu) first and then I'll be good for 2 years? And before that permit expires I need to work on a 'permanent residency' or citizenship? I understand Poland doesn't recognize dual citizenship. I will keep my U.S. citizenship and work towards what I need to remain in Poland permanently.

Thanks for the advice concerning hiring an attorney. I thought it might have been just a waste of money when I could do everything myself. And the comment about if I go to different offices I might get different answers to regarding requirements. Yes, I had read this same thing from other peoples posts in the past. :)

Once again, I want to thank you for taking the time to help me. I'll have other questions as I progress.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,858
21 Jun 2012 #9
I receive Social Security Disability from the U.S.

Do you think this will support you in years to come?

It's worth pointing out that prices are increasing rapidly in Poland.
MoOli 9 | 483
21 Jun 2012 #10
And the comment about if I go to different offices I might get different answers to regarding requirements

[Just ask the concerbed office what documents they need dont go around asking too many peeps as u will get all diff answers.quote=Bluesview]My wife has certified copies of the marriage license (U.S.) [/quote]

[Bro u dont need certified copies just a certificate to be registered at marriage office...befor you have to get it translated by an centrified translator though!quote=delphiandomine]Do you think this will support you in years to come?[/quote]

[ss from disablity can be 75% of the income earned in US,and ss itself can be over 1000$ a month depending on his age.quote=scottie1113]First work out where you will live and then consider how you will put food on the table[/quote]

[a bank statement for 10ka year is just fine and if he has a place to live in.quote=Harry]He will almost certainly need his birth certificate for the Karta Pobytu application but it won't need to registered with or even shown to the Gmina. [/quote]

Are you really stupid or just act like one.......one has to have polish birth certificate and marriage certificate to even apply for residency.

.......one has to have polish birth certificate and marriage certificate to even apply for residency.

Sorry it is mandatory if u apply on the basis of marriage not for work then again he wants to stay and i think wants to be a citizen
Harry
21 Jun 2012 #11
one has to have polish birth certificate and marriage certificate to even apply for residency.

Complete and utter rubbish, as can be confirmed by all of us here who have residency (clearly you have never had it).

Sorry it is mandatory if u apply on the basis of marriage not for work then again he wants to stay and i think wants to be a citizen

No. It. Is. Not.

Really, I have no idea why you try to come here and tell us this rubbish. We live here and some of us have lived here for a long time. You have visited Poland a couple of times for a couple of months: you have never had residency of any type whatsoever (as is shown by the fact that you have been unable to stay here for longer than three months).
Avalon 4 | 1,068
21 Jun 2012 #12
Are you really stupid or just act like one.......one has to have polish birth certificate and marriage certificate to even apply for residency.

I do not have a Polish birth certificate, neither am I married and I have a permanent residence certificate.
MoOli 9 | 483
21 Jun 2012 #13
[Maybe cuz u are a EU resident and read up!quote=Harry]Really, I have no idea why you try to come here and tell us this rubbish. We live here and some of us have lived here for a long time. You have visited Poland a couple of times for a couple of months: you have never had residency of any type whatsoever (as is shown by the fact that you have been unable to stay here for longer than three months).[/quote]

To begin with you dont have a clue what papers I have...like you went to AMCHAM without being a member and I prooved you my name is in the member list,FYI I am also a Polish citizen since dec 2010,secondly Polish BC and Marriage certificate is required for an non EU citizen.
Avalon 4 | 1,068
21 Jun 2012 #14
[Maybe cuz u are a EU resident and read up!

My apologies. I never realised you were referring to a non EU citizen.
MoOli 9 | 483
21 Jun 2012 #15
Accepted! The thread is about an American citizen coming to Poland....:)
Harry
21 Jun 2012 #16
Polish BC and Marriage certificate is required for an non EU citizen.

Please stop lying. A full list of documents can be found here: udsc.gov.pl/WORK,1803.html. There is no mention of birth certificate or marriage certificate, let alone a Polish birth certificate.

Maybe cuz u are a EU resident and read up

Of course he is an EU resident: he has permanent residency here.

like you went to AMCHAM without being a member and I prooved you my name is in the member list

If you were a member, you'd be in the member database. But you are not.

FYI I am also a Polish citizen since dec 2010

Which is why one of your legion of different usernames was here in 2011 asking how to extend the 90-day visa.
MoOli 9 | 483
21 Jun 2012 #17
Which is why one of your legion of different usernames was here in 2011 asking how to extend the 90-day visa.

[Do I really need to think what an english teaching Brit thinks if I even need a 90 day visa...seriously...Ill stick to the topic.quote=Harry]Please stop lying. A full list of documents can be found here: udsc.gov.pl/WORK,1803.html. There is no mention of birth certificate or marriage certificate, let alone a Polish birth certificate.[/quote]

Try with those documents and see for yourself as I have first hand exp.
Harry
21 Jun 2012 #18
Now I want to move to Poland and live with her. What will I need to do?

You can find a full list of all the documents you will need and the legal basis for the procedure here: udsc.gov.pl/MARRIAGE,TO,A,POLISH,CITZEN,1805.html

I would strongly urge you not to listen to MoOli, he is to be as relied upon when it comes to immigration law as he is on libel law (he's been known to accuse restaurants of serving food which is so bad it kills people, of course he does that after his attempt at a business deal with the owner of the restaurant goes south).
Jimmu 2 | 157
21 Jun 2012 #19
As an American citizen who came here with my wife two years ago I can tell you some of what we went through.
You might want to bring original birth certificate and marriage certificate, but you will want to get apostiles of them.
In California that means getting the documents authenticated by the California Secretary of State:

sos.ca.gov/business/notary/authentication.htm

not sure who would handle it in other states.
You need to register the translated marriage certificate apostile at the Urząd Stanu Cywilnego in the area where you will live.
As soon as you get settled go to the Urząd Województwo and apply for residence (Karta Pobytu). You will need proof of income and I think proof of health coverage but my wife says no about the health coverage.

You will need lots of new passport style photos, passports, IDs, copies of everything including stamps in the passports (4 to be safe).
Copy everything many times, never let the originals stray to far and get everything in English translated by a certified translator. (Tłumacz Przysięgły)

Get everything done in the US that you can (apostiles, etc) but probably best to get translatins done in Poland.

Anyway, that's a partial list. Respond or PM if I can help in any way.

should I consider using an attorney to handle this move or would that be a waste of money?

My wife just reminded me to tell you not to waste your money on an attorney.
350 zł for karta pobytu
We can't agree on what we paid for translations. sorry
Wife says figure on 600 - 800 zł for the whole process up to the point you get your first "Green Card". We were married 10 years when we came here so don't remember if you have to be married 3 years or 5 years before you can apply for permanent status.

Also, don't waste much time at the Polish consulate.
Harry
21 Jun 2012 #20
As soon as you get settled go to the Urząd Województwo and apply for residence (Karta Pobytu).

But before one can do that, one has to go to the Gmina office and get one’s maldunek.

never let the originals stray to far and get everything in English translated by a certified translator. (Tłumacz Przysięgły)
Get everything done in the US that you can (apostiles, etc) but probably best to get translatins done in Poland.

It’s a very good idea to show translators original documents but to give them a copy to work from (better yet, email them a scan of the document and agree that they will release the sworn translation only when you show them the original). Also, remember that sworn translations have a ‘best before date’: I had to have my birth certificate translated three times because the foreigners office said that the sworn translation I had was too old (although my birth certificate had in no way changed).
OP Bluesview 2 | 2
21 Jun 2012 #21
I think it'll be ok. It would be equivalent to 6600 zloty a month today. We won't have a mortgage or rent to pay because my wife's flat if paid for now and I'm selling my home in the states (also own, no mortgage). We plan on finding a new flat and using the U.S. home sale to pay for that and rent her current flat. Finder crossed for luck.

I will eventually apply for citizenship in the future. Right now I'm just concerned with what I need to do to live in Poland with my wife. We plan to live in Poland from now on. We will likely live in Pulawy or somewhere close to Lublin.

As I understand things today I will first Karta Pobytu (Residency Permit) which will last me until I can apply for a 'Permit to Settle'/'Permanent Residence' - don't know the proper Polish term for this. And this will last me until I apply for Polish citizenship.

This is what I 'think' is correct. If' I'm wrong please correct my thinking.
Harry
21 Jun 2012 #22
Nearly right Terry: first maldunek, then karta.

BTW, Lublin is a cracking place.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
21 Jun 2012 #23
Lublin is a cracking place

For the benefit of North Americans who live in places at risk of tectonic plate movements, may I clarify Harry's statement. Lublin is a fine place to live.
ukpolska
21 Jun 2012 #24
We will likely live in Pulawy

Hey Terry, give us a shout when you get here as I live in Pulawy, be good to have another native here as I think there are only two or possible three of us here.
MoOli 9 | 483
22 Jun 2012 #25
remember if you have to be married 3 years or 5 years before you can apply for permanent status

[
That law takes in effect after you have resided in poland for 2 years atleast and after you have obtained your permanent residence.
quote=Bluesview]As I understand things today I will first Karta Pobytu (Residency Permit) which will last me until I can apply for a 'Permit to Settle'/'Permanent Residence' - don't know the proper Polish term for this. And this will last me until I apply for Polish citizenship[/quote]

[I was also married to my wife for 17 years when I first applied had to get 2 yrs residence permit for two times and then i got my permanent in 2010 and immediately applied for my citizenship and got it in 7 month. Its then the real work begun of getting polish ID and then applying for passport took me almost 8 months...then again your all p[assport stamps will be checked that you did stay in Poland for 2 years with not leaving the EU zone over 180 days I think and maximum of 9 months I think...be carefull they check every stamp on your passport...the only main reason for refusal to americans.

quote=Jimmu]You will need lots of new passport style photos, passports, IDs, copies of everything including stamps in the passports (4 to be safe).Copy everything many times, never let the originals stray to far and get everything in English translated by a certified translator. (Tłumacz Przysięgły)Get everything done in the US that you can (apostiles, etc) but probably best to get translatins done in Poland.[/quote]

[That is kind of rough and expensive in Nj atleast...first you have to get it notarised (any bank will do it free if u have an acct there) then get it verified at the county offie for the notary and then to the state capital forapostle..if you do it by yourself and not mail costs like 150$ a document express or by mail 50$ but takes almost 3 weeks.quote=Jimmu]You need to register the translated marriage certificate apostile at the Urząd Stanu Cywilnego in the area where you will live.As soon as you get settled go to the Urząd Województwo and apply for residence (Karta Pobytu). You will need proof of income and I think proof of health coverage but my wife says no about the health coverage.[/quote]

Exactly this idiot harry was making a point that one dont need to get the polish version of marriage and birth certificate!

I will eventually apply for citizenship in the future. Right now I'm just concerned with what I need to do to live in Poland with my wife

[
Buddyyou are on disability and looking to work?ouch! 6600pln and xtra income 10k a month approx(i think)ummm best I think u can do is teach english or start business then again you will have to report the income in US and there goes disability:(Just be carefull whatever you do as a Pal of mine had trouble with citibank reporting his offshore income with IRS as supposedly banks will issue you W8 every year of the interest income you earn in Poland thus informing the IRS..

quote=Jimmu]Copy everything many times, never let the originals stray to far [/quote]
They take your orignal birth and marriage certificate and issue you one from poland:) so no worries back home we can get another copy for 5 bucks so dont make a fuss about it when they keep that!same goes with driving license they keep it and issue u a polish one again no worries 5 bucks and u can get new one back:)an dont let this idiot english teacher brit guide you as I have been through the process myself....and for future refernce you have to enter Poland by showing your polish passport and american&Polish one exiting.
Jimmu 2 | 157
22 Jun 2012 #26
another native

Native of where? We're all natives of somewhere....

Buddyyou are on disability and looking to work?

I think you're the one who keeps harping on getting a job and setting up a business, not the OP

As I understand things today I will first Karta Pobytu (Residency Permit) which will last me until I can apply for a 'Permit to Settle'/

Almost right. Karta Pobytu will last up to two years depending on what the clerk puts down. I have not found any rhyme or reason as to how they select the expiration date. Maybe how much they like you? Anyway, you will need to renew the Karta Pobytu until you qualify for the 10 year permit. Then when you have been married long enough and resided in Poland long enough you can apply for citizenship. And make sure you apply for the new Karta Pobytu 45 days before expiration of the current one.

45 seems to be a magic number in Polish bureaucracy.
ukpolska
22 Jun 2012 #27
Native of where? We're all natives of somewhere....

Splitting hairs there lol Do you really wish me to explain it to you?
Jimmu 2 | 157
22 Jun 2012 #28
Do you really wish me to explain it to you?

Actually, I was a bit confused. He's from the US and I would guess from your name that you are either from UK or Polska.

Mostly, I was splitting hairs. :->
ukpolska
22 Jun 2012 #29
Neither, I was actually referring to a native English speaker, but hey ho :)
Jimmu 2 | 157
22 Jun 2012 #30
Some of the posters here would not grant us Yanks the title of Native English Speaker. Thanks for your tolerance!


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