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POLISH FLAG DAYS...when are they...?


wildrover 98 | 4,451
1 Aug 2010 #1
Whilst out for a ride on the Harley yesterday , i noticed there were Polish flags flying on many buildings , and they are on display again today...

Can anyone tell me whats the reason for them displayed this weekend , and if possible tell me what days in the year you should be flying your Polish flag...?

I have to say , my house has had a Polish flag flying over it since i moved in five years ago , which i am told is not legal , but nobody has arrested me for it....yet...!
Zed - | 195
1 Aug 2010 #2
It could be because of anniversary of Warsaw Uprising, which falls today!. BTW, I never thought hoisting/displaying a national flag was ever illegal. A lot of people think, however, that doing so should only take place on special occasions, like this one.
David_18 68 | 982
1 Aug 2010 #3
May 1 – State Holiday
May 2 – Polish Flag Day;
May 3 – Constitution Day;
November 11 – Independence Day.
May 5 and May 9 – Europe Days (together with the European flag);
August 15 – Polish Armed Forces Day
September 27 – Polish Underground State Day.

Bitte schön!!
OP wildrover 98 | 4,451
1 Aug 2010 #4
Thank you very much...i shall note them in my diary...

I rather like having the Polish flag fying over my Polish home , back in the UK , flying the flag of my country would get you labeled as a Nazi which is a bit shamefull...!
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
1 Aug 2010 #5
So basically the flag flies every day in the first half of May?

>^..^<

M-G (hurrah!)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
1 Aug 2010 #6
Wildrover, why does flying the Union Jack in the UK peg you as a Nazi, whilst Americans, Canadians, Danes, Poles and others can fly their national colours with impunity? Some defect or distortion of the British psyche?
OP wildrover 98 | 4,451
1 Aug 2010 #7
Well the British national front , a semi Nazi organisation used the Union jack as their symbol , so now every non white and politically correct nut in the UK finds the British flag offensive....

I wish they could accept its the flag of our country , something to be proud of...if they don,t like it they can always leave the dam country...!

Its ironic that when i flew the the UK flag over my home in Poland nobody had any problems with it...i would not be able to do it without problems at my home in the UK...WHATS THAT ALL ABOUT...?
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
1 Aug 2010 #8
The Danes? I don't think so. Wildrover's statement is a bit bold as I don't think he would be labeled a Nazi when he would fly the Union Jack in Britain. However, he would be frowned upon, just like in most of Western Europe as it's regarded sth of the older days. Being overly proud of your country is regarded as scary as it's remembered to what being overly proud of one's country can lead to. And besides, most ppl in Western Europe simply don't like it or don't have a flagpole anyway :)

>^..^<

M-G (does not have a flagpole)
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,105
1 Aug 2010 #9
something to be proud of...if they don,t like it they can always leave the dam country...!

Yes it is sad that in the UK the flag represents extremists rather than people who are proud of their country. The only place it seems acceptable to fly it is parliament or the palaces or castles, that kind of thing. Otherwise, the ordinary householder who wants to fly the flag is usually seen as being affiliated to some kind of extreme group. Shame.
OP wildrover 98 | 4,451
1 Aug 2010 #10
Shortly before i drove to Belarus and Russia in 1997 i was in the city of Bradford in Yorkshire in my Landrover , which as well as having GB stickers , also had some Union jack stickers on it...

The city of Bradford has quite a high number of Asian people...As i returned to the Landrover after shopping in a supermarket i met a group of young Asian guys who clearly did not like my Union jack stickers , and asked if i was in the National front...?

I told them that this was the flag of my country , which i was proud of , and since they were born in the UK , it was also the flag of their country , they seemed happy enough at that....

My union jack stickers caused no problems at all in Holland , Germany , Poland , Belarus , Russia , Latvia and Lithuania...

No , i don,t miss the UK...ITS FULL OF IDIOTS...!
Stu 12 | 522
1 Aug 2010 #11
as it's regarded sth of the older days

I'm sorry, M-G, but I do fly the Dutch flag on Her Majesty's Birthday (April 30th) and 4 (Remembrance) and 5th May (Liberation). Now I'm not really one of the old generation.

One of the differences I noted in PL is that the flag also stays out after sunset, which in the Netherlands, is not allowed.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
2 Aug 2010 #12
I'm sorry, M-G, but I do fly the Dutch flag on Her Majesty's Birthday (April 30th) and 4 (Remembrance) and 5th May (Liberation). Now I'm not really one of the old generation.

I said it's generally looked upon like that. I don't mind if ppl want to fly their flag on national hols. I'm from the same generation as you are and as a kid I always liked it when the flags were out on Queensday, which was back then her actual b-day, especially when the weather was nice. Gives this festive atmosphere in the air, if you know what I mean.

In NL the flag also has to be destroyed if it touches the ground, I believe.

>^..^<

M-G (coffee)
Stu 12 | 522
2 Aug 2010 #13
In NL the flag also has to be destroyed if it touches the ground, I believe.

Not anymore.

The rules are as follows:

A flag representing a country (any country) should be raised at sunrise and lowered at sunset (unless there are floodlights on both sides). If the flag touches the ground, it should be washed. If the flag is "abused" (whatever that may mean), it still should be burned.

Suppose I would want to raise the Polish and the Dutch flag, then the Dutch flag should be on the right side. With three flags, the Dutch flag flies in the middle, and the next most important on the right. Unless there is no next important, then one should use the alphabet. But for that you have to follow the names of the countries in French (rule from Napoleontic times).

So in case we'd want to raise the Dutch, Polish and Spanish flag, the Polish flag would fly on the left, then the Dutch flag with the Spanish flag on the right (since Spain is called Espagne in French and hence is alphabetically before the P).
BABTIEMAN 1 | 5
25 Aug 2010 #14
Slightly off topic! The Union flag of Great Britain is only called the "Union Jack" when raised on the "Jack" mast of a ship. It is used also as the white ensign when combined with the cross of Saint George (Patron Saint of England) on naval warships and flown as a battle ensign so as not to hide the nationality or intent of that vessel. There is a second ensign which is similar but has a red background and known as the "red ensign" which shows that this naval vessel is a civilian ship carrying passengers or supplies and is not equipped for warfare. The Union Flag represents the union of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. I love my country, my Grandparents died for her to give me freedom. I also love Poland as we stood together to defeat Fascism. Long may the Union flag fly over Great Britain and I as an Englishman would be proud to fly the White and Red Eagle of Poland on my land at any time as a mark of respect to our cultures along with the Dutch, Belgian, French, Norwegian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Danish, and other European countries to which we owe our cosmopolitan culture over the decades.

If you are proud of your heritage display it but be sensitive to others at the same time. tolerance is a virtue that is evaporating! Dobranoc i Pozdrawiam! Paul
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
25 Aug 2010 #15
Yes it is sad that in the UK the flag represents extremists rather than people who are proud of their country. The only place it seems acceptable to fly it is parliament or the palaces or castles, that kind of thing. Otherwise, the ordinary householder who wants to fly the flag is usually seen as being affiliated to some kind of extreme group. Shame.

Usually seen by whom? Its all about perception and about brainwashing...I wouldnt personally fly a flag, but I dont automatically assume someone is a nazi because they want to.

Slightly off topic! The Union flag of Great Britain is only called the "Union Jack" when raised on the "Jack" mast of a ship.

This is a common mistake often made..My mums side are all Royal Navy so I knew this :D
McCoy 27 | 1,275
25 Aug 2010 #16
back in the UK , flying the flag of my country would get you labeled as a Nazi which is a bit shamefull...!

you can also hurt immigrants feelings by having in your country on your house your national flag. and we shall never forget that what we all want in Europe is to make all foreigners to feel here as if they were at home. their home, when they can set the rules.
OP wildrover 98 | 4,451
25 Aug 2010 #17
you can also hurt immigrants feelings by having in your country on your house your national flag.

Thats strange....as an Englishman in Poland i do not feel in the least bit hurt or offended by seeing Polish flags all over the place...

I can,t actually think of any country apart from the UK where waving your national flag about would cause so much offence...

But i dont live in the UK... and have no wish to return there...
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
25 Aug 2010 #18
I think it's more accurate to say that only two groups of people really object or get "offended" by the Union Flag/Flag of St George being flown in England:

1. The left-wing PC traitors who would love us to be ruled by another country, and hate everything British, despite being British themselves.

2. A certain group of non-indigenous people, who tend to get referred to as "Asian", but we all know which word describes them more accurately ;) Using this catch-all term is offensive to the vast majority of Asians who really don't give a damn about whether the flag is flown or not.

I've never met anyone Chinese, Filipino, Spanish, Italian, Caribbean, South African, Sikh, Hindu, Jewish, German, Czech, Slovak or indeed Polish who ever objected to our national flags being flown, so who on earth are these people who object? Oh, I've answered that already :)
Lost
6 Apr 2011 #19
Wildrover,

You will see flags flying in Gibraltar, Jersey, Guernsey, Falkland Islands and Northern Island - every place that has lost or been under extreme threat of losing it's national identity. When your life is indanger, lots of people find god and when your country is in danger - you find your national indentity.

I am happy to be in Poland as well.
isthatu2 4 | 2,704
6 Apr 2011 #20
Why dont you worms just say Paki, you know you want to? Scared it will make you look as thick as the jew haters on here? Well,here's a newsflash....winking and not saying it just makes you look like cowardly bigots rather than just plain bigots.
Bieganski 17 | 901
3 May 2016 #21
President Duda marked Flag Day this year with very important and inclusive remarks:

Flag Day has been celebrated in Poland since an act of parliament passed in February 2004 and is commemorated alongside Polonia and Poles Abroad Day

"The white and red flag is ours, it is shared," the president said. "It belongs to all those who live in Poland and all those who live abroad but feel Polish in their hearts," he added.

Source: thenews.pl/1/9/Artykul/251069,Poland-marks-Flag-Day

Hear! Hear!
delphiandomine 83 | 17,915
3 May 2016 #22
President Duda marked Flag Day this year with very important and inclusive remarks:

He also celebrated it by being booed out of the Stadion Narodowy :D

Nothing new there. Every Polish politician tries to woo the Polonia lobby. PO did it to devastating effect in 2007, for instance.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
3 May 2016 #23
being booed out

Since when have you become a fan of football hooligans? If you coudl bash PiS you'd even support Hitler or Stalin. Sick, sick, sick!
delphiandomine 83 | 17,915
3 May 2016 #24
I'm not a fan of them, I'm simply amused that they've now turned on PiS.

Now we get to see how PiS deal with hooligans. Amusing, amusing.
Bieganski 17 | 901
3 May 2016 #25
Nothing new there.

Indeed, so you admit then that the anti-Polish propaganda peddled by integration refuseniks like yourself and your cohorts over the years on PF about Poles wanting to have nothing to do with their diaspora has been a complete pack of lies.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,915
3 May 2016 #26
Who said anything about the Poles?

I said that it's a common situation for Polish politicians to suck up to the Polonia for votes. Nothing new, and doesn't change the fact that most Poles regard the Polonia as being laughable at best and with downright hostility for their interference in Polish affairs at worst.
Harry
3 May 2016 #27
Got to love the way that cat Duda unites Poles! Pretty much the only thing Legia Warsaw and Lech Poznan fans agreed on was what they think of him.

It's only a pity that that cat Duda's boss, The Dear Leader Chairman Kaczynski, wasn't at the match: he'd have got a lot more than jeers.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
3 May 2016 #28
Amusing, amusing.

As I have repeatedly said, it's all a joke or game ot you. Sit back and watch the fun, eh?
delphiandomine 83 | 17,915
3 May 2016 #29
Pretty much the only thing Legia Warsaw and Lech Poznan fans agreed on was what they think of him.

Quite a remarkable achievement by all accounts, given the sheer hatred they have for each other :D

Back to the topic ... flag days
Bieganski 17 | 901
4 May 2016 #30
Nothing new, and doesn't change the fact that most Poles regard the Polonia as being laughable at best and with downright hostility for their interference in Polish affairs at worst.

Your understanding of Poland, Polish thought and sentiment, and Polish politics is the only thing that is laughable. You couldn't be more out of touch with reality.

Polish politicians don't court votes from Polonia because according to your absurd agitprop the Polish electorate in Poland is somehow disenfranchised. Flag day along with Polonia and Poles Abroad Day were instituted and regularly commemorated by all ruling parties precisely because they are matters which Poles both in Poland and Poles abroad care about. This is now official Polish policy because it reflects the will of all Poles.

Unlike in the previous century where your mentality is stuck Poles today do not want to have their Polish identity stripped away from them or have their ties to Poland and other Poles severed simply because work requirements or family circumstances require time and distance away from Polska.


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