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Is becoming a Polish national this easy?


Tonino 8 | 14
30 Apr 2014 #1
Hi everyone,
First post! Happy to be here.

I will becoming to Poland to study for four years, and will be getting a long stay permit.

I've been reading up on how to become Polish on the internet (I can't link webpages in this forum, I've just discovered).

Simply put, it says that after 3 years, you can qualify for citizenship IF you are a permanent resident or a long term resident (which I will be), and speak the Polish language (I'm studying!). Is it really that fast to become a Polish national? I was talking to a British friend about this and he was surprised by how fast you can become Polish.

Thank you.
Wulkan - | 3,251
30 Apr 2014 #2
Is becoming Polish this easy?

What is your current nationality? it depends on that too.
medhat - | 1
30 Apr 2014 #3
I think if your residence for studding two years will be count as one
OP Tonino 8 | 14
30 Apr 2014 #4
I'm Canadian by nationality.

Do they really discriminate against students like that for long term visas? I will look into this once I arrive into Poland and begin enquiring, but do you have any way to link me via private message? (they don't allow links to be posted here)

Thank you.
Monitor 14 | 1,820
30 Apr 2014 #5
It's relatively easy, but you read it wrong. It's not 3 years but 5 and knowledge of language is not necessary. Studying time is counted in 50%. So if you come study here for 4 years you will still have to find work and have some occupation for the next 3 years. You cannot leave Poland during all these years for more than 6 months. Currently foreign students serve as a source of money for schools suffering under demographic low. That's why there is such a regulation. Students money is needed, but not immigrants.

I've heard that in Russia recently law was altered and all graduates can get permanent permit to stay automatically. Perhaps you're interested.

You will be able to post links after you write a little. Remove http:// to post it anyway.

Now I've noticed that you've asked about getting Polish citizenship, not long term residency. It's harder than long term residency. Basically you need to have Polish ancestors, get married to Pole or apply for the citizenship after living in Poland for 3 years since obtaining "long-term EU resident permit". This is actually what you've mentioned in the 1st post. In the previous post I've explained how to get "long-term EU resident permit". It's min. 5 years. So citizenship is 5 + 3 years. And in your case would be 7+3 (except you marry beforehand or have some Polish ancestors)

But I think citizenship doesn't have any serious advantages over long term residency. It's the thing to do after living for many years in Poland.
OP Tonino 8 | 14
30 Apr 2014 #6
Thanks Monitor. Take a look at this: polish-citizenship eu/foreigners.html

From what I read there, you just need the long term residency for 3 years. But good to know that studying counts only for half the time... would have gotten my hopes up otherwise.

Am I mistaken thinking that I can get a long term residency right away? I already have a permit to stay in Europe and I'm just coming over to Poland and switching it for long term stay visa. I thought from then on it'd be 3 years...

Even if it's 50% for school years, 4 yrs would count for 2 yrs, then I'd have to work one full year in Poland to get the 3rd year, no?

From what you say it seems like I need to spend ~5 yrs just to get the long term stay visa. Which I understand, because some countries will issue "permanent resident" visas only after 5 years. But in this case they say permanent resident or long term, so I got a bit too excited.

Thank you again!
Monitor 14 | 1,820
30 Apr 2014 #7
From what I read there, you just need the long term residency for 3 years.

That only if you marry Polish citizen

Am I mistaken thinking that I can get a long term residency right away? I already have a permit to stay in Europe and I'm just coming over to Poland and switching it for long term stay visa. I thought from then on it'd be 3 years...

Other European countries are irrelevant. Here you have conditions for Long term permit. It's 5 years:

Even if it's 50% for school years, 4 yrs would count for 2 yrs, then I'd have to work one full year in Poland to get the 3rd year, no?

5 - 2 = 3 more

From what you say it seems like I need to spend ~5 yrs just to get the long term stay visa.

Long term residency, not visa. Visa expires and this residency permit doesn't

Which I understand, because some countries will issue "permanent resident" visas only after 5 years

I think all EU countries because this permit is called "long-term resident of the EU"
OP Tonino 8 | 14
30 Apr 2014 #8
I see... thank you! Well, there goes my hopes out the window of working in the EU.
Dont gag me yo 7 | 156
30 Apr 2014 #9
But I think citizenship doesn't have any serious advantages over long term residency

Polish citizenship with a foreign citizenship is infact is very problematic,you have to declare your income in both countries and answer to stupid questions of the tax departments and god forbis if your income declines in any of the country the both country tax departments also look into your underwear almost to get to the bottom (eg:one of my tenants left and was paying almost7k a month) but I had lot of explaining to do and numerous trips to there offices and paperwork with accountants in both countries.If given a chance all over I would stick with my old permit to settle in Poland.
Monitor 14 | 1,820
30 Apr 2014 #10
Polish citizenship with a foreign citizenship is infact is very problematic,you have to declare your income in both countries

Depending which country. Many don't cause problems for people with 2 passports.

I see... thank you! Well, there goes my hopes out the window of working in the EU.

I guess that you're not interested in working in Poland? Because foreigners graduating Polish university don't need work permit to work in Poland. It's similar in other countries, so if you study in Germany, then with German diploma you can legally work in Germany. (at least for few years, but later you can get "long-term resident of the EU") To advertise Germany more studies there are for free also for foreigners.
Harry
30 Apr 2014 #11
Depending which country. Many don't cause problems for people with 2 passports.

Yes, but one would need to have a Polish passport in order to know that: the person to whom you were speaking does not have a Polish passport and never has had one.

I guess that you're not interested in working in Poland?

Isn't Poland 'EU'?
Dont gag me yo 7 | 156
30 Apr 2014 #12
Yes, but one would need to have a Polish passport in order to know that

since when anyone needs a polish passport to be a polish citizen to begin with? national id is the only requirement to have.
Dont gag me yo 7 | 156
1 May 2014 #14
Depending which country

sorry I was comparing the USA and the POland
OP Tonino 8 | 14
3 May 2014 #15
Because foreigners graduating Polish university don't need work permit to work in Poland.

I did not know that. That is great to know! Unfortunately I have studied in Switzerland and they allow you 6 months to look for a job, but it's by no means a work permit. It's just a permit that allows you to look for jobs. That been said, if you find a job, it's very difficult to get the position if you're not Swiss or part of the EU-country members.

I was interested in working in other EU countries to open up choices, and becoming Polish would have allowed me to get my foot in the door. Doesn't seem like I really have a way into all the EU countries but Poland as I will be studying there for 4 years.

Thank you!
Monitor 14 | 1,820
3 May 2014 #16
Isn't Poland 'EU'?

It is, but I've guessed right.


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