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I want to run a Persian (Iranian) restaurant in Poland!


delphiandomine 83 | 17,647
13 Apr 2016  #31
I doubt that there would be a lot of clients for Iranian (or Afghan or whatever of the same style) cooking.

That's why I reckon a food truck is the way forward - the capital costs are considerably lower, and a good offer will attract the masses if the location is right. If it doesn't work, then he won't lose much money.

But a restaurant is just a licence to lose vast amounts of cash.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
13 Apr 2016  #32
It also seems to me that almost everybody's grandma wants to open a restaurant ;). Unfortunately very few do make it...
delphiandomine 83 | 17,647
13 Apr 2016  #33
I remember years ago visiting one of those routiers restaurants in France, and the owner even then explained that it was a very tough business to be in, even though he had plenty of passing trade and wasn't struggling for customers. He showed me what a typical day looked like - he was working 14-15 hours a day 6 days a week, with the 'day off' being reserved for business paperwork.

The only restaurants that seem to succeed in Poland in the long term seem to be ones that have a highly successful weddings/event business.

(ah, the days of being able to speak French to a reasonable level...)
InPolska 11 | 1,821
13 Apr 2016  #34
Although I don't cook, I love good food and also watching all sorts of cooking shows and I can say that in order to have a profitable business, the number of clients to have EVERY DAY is rather impressive to be able to pay for everything and have a decent income. I love watchintg Gordon Ramsay, among others in his "nightmare's kitchens" (when in the US, it's really top ;););) ) and it is easy to understant that in this type of business, only the very good do survive. Very often, Gordon advises them to switch to some other kind of food because it is more appropriate just not to collapse...

Sorry, someone getting off the plane does not decide to start a restaurant in a strange place without seriously studying everything beforehand;). This is no kid's stuff ;)
delphiandomine 83 | 17,647
13 Apr 2016  #35
I love watchintg Gordon Ramsay, among others in his "nightmare's kitchens" (when in the US, it's really top ;););) )

I watched this a while ago - youtube.com/watch?v=0f-j1ctaQqw - Marcus Wareing is going to work at 7am and isn't getting home until after midnight. The documentary is worth a watch - those guys are busting their guts to try and win/keep Michelin stars, and even despite it all, Wareing still hasn't won his 3rd star...

The OP would be well advised to watch this if he wants to understand just how difficult it is to actually run a restaurant.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
13 Apr 2016  #36
Basically an Iranian food restaurant would attract occasional clients only but in order to pay for everything and to make a living the clientele has to be plentiful and constant. That's why I seriously doubt about the idea ...
Harry
13 Apr 2016  #37
an Iranian food restaurant would attract occasional clients only

One could say the same about a Lebanese falafel place or a Israeli hummus place but exactly those ventures have been so successful they have multiple locations in Warsaw.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
13 Apr 2016  #38
Thanks, Delph, but since it's some 58 minutes long, I'll watch it later on. Those who come to us saying that they mean to come to Poland whereas they know nothing about country, people, lifestyle, etc... to open restaurants really make me laugh and there is always someone who obviously knows nothing about the business who will write "yes, I like X or Y type of food and for sure you'll make it in Poland". Come on, let's be serious!

Opening a restaurant and then to have it running in order to make a profit is serious business and not something that can be improvized.

Yes, Delph, OP can also get informed from such professionals. Gordon Ramsay is simply great and I believe a solid reference in the business. He cracks me up when he talks ;). Well, inspite of his success and of his money, he has remained close to the people and has not forgotten about where he is from. Do you guys (or maybe Jon does) know whether Gordon has a restaurant in Warsaw? If so, I'd go. He's also someone I would really love to meet. I'm a big fan ;)

@Harry: maybe 1 or 2 make it. but it does not mean that there is a big market for such food. ;)
jon357 63 | 14,124
14 Apr 2016  #39
One could say the same about a Lebanese falafel place or a Israeli hummus place but exactly those ventures have been so successful they have multiple locations in Warsaw

Remember it's got to appeal, fit an established format and have the right premises.

Even a falafel place earns its bread and butter from greasy kebabs.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
14 Apr 2016  #40
Absolutely, Jon! Greasy and stinky kebabs are not what anyone would call "fancy" "cuisine" and also in order to make a "fortune" ouf ot them, need to sell quite a lot and having ONE guy able to make it does not mean that just anybody (especially trying to get info from a random forum) can and will make it. In whatever situations, there are always 1 or 2 exceptions ;)
jon357 63 | 14,124
14 Apr 2016  #41
Persian food can be delicious and delicate. Afghan food's nice too, though not a vast range of dishes.

His restaurant might work in Warsaw if he has;
a. Perfect premises, excellent location and cheap
b. A 'cash cow' like a kebab window
c. A very keen eye for the restaurant trade
d. A business idea that isn't just his dream of a lovely restaurant but is something that is commercially viable
e. Enough money to not need to depend on the cash income for a couple of years at least
f. A lot of luck
g. A drinks licence
InPolska 11 | 1,821
14 Apr 2016  #42
Might be (I don't like lamb, mutton, rice .... ;) ) but I don't think more than a handful people (maybe mostly Anglo expats) would go for it in a place like Warsaw (Poles are very conservative even in their culinary likes and dislikes).

However, whatever the kind of food, in order to succeed a lot of things have to be considered ....and the OP should deal with professionals rather than people from a random forum ;).

Yes, it is also a matter of luck but if in order to do something, luck is the only asset, it may be tough! ;)

Have a nice day!

@Jon: since you are into that, there La Maison Gourmande opened by a French woman of Lebanese origin. She offers both "cuisines". I have never been there but several clients of mine have and all say, it's good but kind of on the expensive side;)
jon357 63 | 14,124
14 Apr 2016  #43
I wonder what's made that Warsaw restaurant a success when others fail.

Sounds worth a visit anyway.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
14 Apr 2016  #44
Jon: it is rather recent. Anyway not all restaurants collapse (in Poland and elsewhere) and besides there are a lot of other factors beside mere food to make it a success or a failure.

Basically not everybody can open and operate a restaurant or any kind of business. Too many "amateurs" think they can make it because they have some coins and a few "good recipes" ;)
jon357 63 | 14,124
14 Apr 2016  #45
I wonder if there are any resources that might help the OP
Mohammadreza - | 2
7 Jul 2019  #46
Hi Asha
Have you been successfull in touch your goal???
What are you doing in these years??


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