The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Law  % width posts: 38

Is there much demand in Poland for real ale?


ewan28 2 | 4
13 Sep 2012 #1
hi can anyone help.is there much damand in poland for real ale.
Harry
13 Sep 2012 #2
Depends what exactly you mean by "real ale".
poland_
13 Sep 2012 #3
hi can anyone help.is there much damand in poland for real ale

You should contact the owner of this English bar in Warszawa [legendsbar.pl] they have a couple of Real ale's on tap so maybe they can give you feedback.
OP ewan28 2 | 4
13 Sep 2012 #4
harry what would you mean if you were talking about real ale
Harry
13 Sep 2012 #5
In short, the stuff that is alive.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
14 Sep 2012 #6
There isn't even a generally known term for ale in Polish. It is all piwo. Oxford Dictioanry gives 'ale' as the Polish equivalent of English ale. but no Pole would know what that means. It's a cultrual thing. Like asking: is there a market amngst the English for zsiadłe mleko, kwas or żur?
me12
14 Sep 2012 #7
ok thanks for that.just i have working in a brewery for 10 years.making real ale.my wife is from poland.i was think of starting a micro brewery in poland.
Harry
14 Sep 2012 #8
Not a bad idea at all. However, there are already micro-breweries in many cities in Poland, so you'd need to check locations carefully if you're thinking of a brew-pub type venture.

Please don't listen to the wittering of Polonia types who think that Poland is still the same as it was in the 1930s: there are plenty of Poles who know what ale is. My local beer shop keeps at least 120 different beers in stock and has more than 300 available via its website (some with longish lead times). My current favourite brewery has a website which is partly in English [alebrowar.pl/en] Another brewery which is spoken of highly but which I don't particularly like the beers of is Browar Pinta, you can see their product range here: [browarpinta.pl/oferta] The Polish beer scene has been going through something of a revolution over the last five or six years, basically small breweries are doing better and better while BrewCorps are doing worse and worse. But there is currently no brewery here making proper English beer (due in large part to pubs very simply not having the required equipment and not wanting to install it).

If you're ever in Warsaw and fancy a chat about beer and visiting a few pubs which show what is on offer, just drop me a private message here.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
14 Sep 2012 #9
hi can anyone help.is there much damand in poland for real ale.

Frankly there would be if you were in my living room. I don't like all real ales but I generally am very happy to try any at least ten times at any one sitting.

There are some microbreweries here in Wrocław I believe, just as there are in the UK, and the supermarkets sell make your own home brew kits. Whether that's any indication of demand I don't know. A person has to have tried real ale to know what they're missing (yes I know that not all are anything to get excited about, but generally they're pretty good compared to typical beers)

For any lurkers who have no idea what we're talking about, please see [camra.org.uk/page.php?id=14]

Why isn't all beer real?

Real ale is a natural, living product. By its nature this means it has a limited shelf life and needs to be looked after with care in the pub cellar and kept at a certain temperature to enable it to mature and bring out its full flavours for the drinker to enjoy.

Brewery-conditioned, or keg, beer has a longer shelf life as it is not a living product. Basically, after the beer has finished fermentation in the brewery and has been conditioned, it is chilled and filtered to remove all the yeast and then it is pasteurised to make it sterile. This is then put in a sealed container, called a keg, ready to be sent to the pub.

The problem is that removing the yeast and 'killing off' the product through pasteurisation also removes a great deal of the taste and aroma associated with real ale. Because there is no secondary fermentation occurring in the container (i.e keg) in which is held, there is no natural carbonation of the beer so gas either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen has to be added to "fizz up" the beer. This creates an unnaturally fizzy beer rather than the gentle carbonation produced by the slow secondary fermentation in a cask of real ale.

delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
14 Sep 2012 #10
A person has to have tried real ale to know what they're missing (yes I know that not all are anything to get excited about, but generally they're pretty good compared to typical beers)

I don't like them, but I'm open to suggestions if anyone can recommend very light ones?

If you're ever in Warsaw and fancy a chat about beer and visiting a few pubs which show what is on offer, just drop me a private message here.

I vouch for Harry being a very good marketing rep for the Polish beer industry.

I found a great Polish cherry beer once, but ****** if I remember the name of it :(
poland_
14 Sep 2012 #11
ok thanks for that.just i have working in a brewery for 10 years.making real ale.my wife is from poland.i was think of starting a micro brewery in poland.

I could be interested in that, send me a pm and I will give you my contact details I am based in Warszawa.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
14 Sep 2012 #12
I don't like them, but I'm open to suggestions if anyone can recommend very light ones?

I'll try to remember what I liked last time I was drinking some - not sure I'll be able to for obvious reasons! a VERY light one, hmmm...?

I could be interested in that, send me a pm and I will give you my contact details I am based in Warszawa.

I hope I can come to any mass tastings, purely for professional purposes of course!

delphiandomine
Try Edge, I don't remember it if I did try it but I think it's a Brewdog creation.

Also Summer Ale, Old Chestnut and maybe Hylder Blond. Best get to a tasting before buying though.

Not sure what light or very light means with a real ale, I'm not that expert at them. I think you lose the flavour perhaps. But this sounds like it did well and might meet your tastebuds

Flor-ale 3.8%

SW Sussex CAMRA beer of the festival 2011! A delectable light blonde, with delicate floral hop notes, using only Maris Otter low colour malt. Pleasant sweet finish. Perfect springtime refreshment.

princegeorgebrighton.co.uk/ales-of-sussex/

I like the sound of delectable light blondes, I have to say...
Harry
14 Sep 2012 #13
My local beer shop just got a delivery of Brewdog beers. Right now I'm having a rather nice Bialy Kot, from a Radom virtual brewery, recommended.
poland_
14 Sep 2012 #14
The business concept of Brewdog was originally rolled out by an Aussie company, Brewdogs business plan was plagiarism. I have most of the documentation of Brewdog sitting on my computer.
pawian 161 | 9,971
14 Sep 2012 #15
Depends what exactly you mean by "real ale".

Exactly.

there are plenty of Poles who know what ale is.

Sorry, I only suspect what it is. Is it dark beer like Guinness?
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
14 Sep 2012 #16
That's categorised as stout.
Other big brand stouts I can think of include Murphy's and Tooheys

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stout
poland_
14 Sep 2012 #17
Sorry, I only suspect what it is. Is it dark beer like Guinness?

Real ale is to ' beer heads ' like top Gear is for ' Petrol heads '
pawian 161 | 9,971
14 Sep 2012 #18
Thank you guys for detailed explanation. Now I know the difference.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
15 Sep 2012 #19
Check this out. bierhalle.pl
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
15 Sep 2012 #20
The business concept of Brewdog was originally rolled out by an Aussie company, Brewdogs business plan was plagiarism. I have most of the documentation of Brewdog sitting on my computer.

Is there really much to steal? Innovative (edgy) marketing, the old Alex Ferguson tactic at Aberdeen of making it seem like "us against them" and a very good product that lives up to what their marketing says?

Their share issue was rather amusing if you followed it - people thought they were buying a worthwhile stake in the company, but the shares were all but worthless.

Was rather strange to see a hometown company (Aberdeen) advertising their products on the walls of a pub here, though.
poland_
16 Sep 2012 #21
Alex Ferguson tactic at Aberdeen of making it seem like "us against them"

Must be something in the water in Aberdeen...

The British and Irish have always been world leaders in repackaging, the model works so why reinvent the wheel?
OP ewan28 2 | 4
16 Sep 2012 #22
well am going to be over at xmas.think a brewpub will be the best bet.so will give me a chance to get out to some pubs an have a look at whats out there.
Cardno85 31 | 976
30 Jul 2013 #23
supermarkets sell make your own home brew kits

Really? I have never seen them here in Kraków and I have never tried to make my own beer. That said, I think it's something I might enjoy (I like cooking and drinking beer...that's a qualifier no?). Have you tried the sets? Any good?

Also, if anyone knows a good online brew shop in Poland, I'd be interested.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
30 Jul 2013 #24
Really? I have never seen them here in Kraków and I have never tried to make my own beer

I can't remember where I saw them now. I'll try and remember !
Cardno85 31 | 976
31 Jul 2013 #25
That would be awesome, I will send you a bottle of the result!
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
2 Aug 2013 #26
I might have seen them in either one of the boys' toys type of shops in one of the malls, or at Fenwick which is in Wroc's city centre (a department store).

Until I can remember for sure, maybe think about mail order -- twojbrowar.pl/prestashop/pl/ or check out Allegro online auctions
allegro.pl/listing/listing.php?string=piwo+domowe
Cardno85 31 | 976
2 Aug 2013 #27
/prestashop/pl/

This is pretty much exactly the type of site I was hoping for. Good work InWroclaw, a bottle of Cardno Ale shall be winging it's way to you...when I get round to buying and making stuff.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
2 Aug 2013 #28
You're more than welcome, and I hope you enjoy some good brews soon :o)

PS If you buy through Allegro, try to pay via PayU or Cash On Delivery (lots of sellers allow COD for a small surcharge)
ng51guy
24 Dec 2013 #29
I'm from UK and travelled quite alot around Poland with my Polish girlfriend Halina. I really do love Poland, I think the people are very friendly and respectful, the food blows me away and being from UK it's still very cheap IE 4ZL for a pint.

The only down side is I love real ale and try as I might you just cannot find it ANYWHERE in Poland ! the closest that I have found is a bottled beer called Irish beer piwaregionalne.pl/index/showbeer/id/10.html real nice beer this.

I also came across a mega strong but still good ale called black boss in a bar Poznan beerclubguide.com/2707/black-boss-porter-by-browar-witnica-brewer y .
These 2 beers have been the only ones I would say come close to English real ale.
Hard to beat English real ale for me would be Marstons pedigree insidebeer.com/articles/20121127 .
Bottled ale would be Batemans victory ale britishcraftbeers.com/victory-ale-60 .
If only Poland started producing ales of this style ! maybe one day.
Jardinero 1 | 407
25 Dec 2013 #30
If only Poland started producing ales of this style ! maybe one day.

I agree that it is very hard to beat English ales. If the demand for ale is on the rise in PL, perhaps setting up an import business from the UK could be an option? Or starting up your own micro ale brewery?

Wesołych Świąt!


Home / Law / Is there much demand in Poland for real ale?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.