The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Law  % width posts: 40

Can I come to Poland with my girlfriend on the student visa as a dependent?


djaramax 3 | 9
15 Jun 2010 #1
Using the student visa.
But we are not marry yet, how can i come with her ????
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2010 #2
Using the student visa.

No. She will need her own visa.

how can i come with her ????

She gets her own visa.

Why are you still asking? It's obvious that you can't support yourself in Poland, and now you want to bring baggage, too? Even if you could bring her on the student visa (you can if you're married) - you would then have to have enough money coming in each month to cover both of you.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
15 Jun 2010 #3
It's obvious that you can't support yourself in Poland, and now you want to bring baggage, too

How cruel - wont it be a bit cold in the hold for her? ;0)

I was going to comment on this thread, but after I told him that his chances of Polish citizenship are zero without a job, he got a bit shirty and told me "Im going in the wrong direction"
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2010 #4
I would argue that it's him trying to go in the wrong direction ;)

How cruel - wont it be a bit cold in the hold for her? ;0)

Hahaha, I doubt he's got the money for the plane ticket anyway :P

Let this thread be a warning to Indians and others - POLAND IS NOT THE LAND OF MILK AND HONEY THAT YOU THINK IT IS, NO MATTER WHAT YOUR "AGENT" TELLS YOU.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
15 Jun 2010 #5
delphiandomine wrote:

Let this thread be a warning to Indians and others - POLAND IS NOT THE LAND OF MILK AND HONEY THAT YOU THINK IT IS, NO MATTER WHAT YOUR "AGENT" TELLS YOU.

it's great to see you coming to your senses, delph. many of your most recent posts display the same attitude towards poland. it's only a matter of time in this country. right around when the 2 year mark starts creeping up on you and the honeymoon is over, you start seeing Poland for what it really is......a difficult place to live.
OP djaramax 3 | 9
15 Jun 2010 #6
My aunty is live in poland. i think its not make a differ to me.
thanx for all
internaldialog 4 | 145
15 Jun 2010 #7
My aunty is live in poland.

If that was the case why the FUK have you asked on here when you could have got the information from you aunt?????

Sorry but i think you have been told by those that are in the know on all the threads you've posted on ... that Poland is NOT the bed of roses you seem to think it is or believe it is ... i'm not having a pop but you are very disillusioned in what you hope to get in Poland.

i think its not make a differ to me.

It will indeed make a difference one you are not your Aunt you are you and what applies for one doesnt necessarily apply to someone else!

You really need to understand this before you even want to make a life in Poland and bring a GF with you .... as pointed out you WILL NEED to be able to finance yourself in Poland and clearly you DO NOT have the means to do this with being a STUDENT and unless you have a VERY good command of the Polish language which is clear you dont you will not get far with any PART TIME work

......!
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2010 #8
it's great to see you coming to your senses, delph.

Well - to be fair, for people like us - white, educated and able to string a sentence together coherently, it's not *that* difficult a place to live - no worse than the UK, at least. But for someone from Asia who can't even speak English properly and who doesn't have the money to survive here without working? They don't have a chance.

I suspect that there are "schools" in Poland aggressively recruiting in Asia - from what he says about his agent "recommending" him that joke of a school in Warsaw, it sounds like he doesn't have a clue. I'm really not sure why he thinks he can get a part time job here too - come on, it's Poland for crying out loud, it's hardly a multicultural place!

In fact, I'll give a piece of advice to people for free -

POLAND IS NOT AN EASY ROUTE INTO THE EU. In fact, it's probably one of the hardest ways in!
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
15 Jun 2010 #9
Man, is it me or each sri lankan has a Polish girlfriend?

He hasnt, he wants to bring his girlfriend from Sri Lanaka.

POLAND IS NOT AN EASY ROUTE INTO THE EU. In fact, it's probably one of the hardest ways in!

Unless they marry a Pole and then they are "free as a bird" and usually enquiring about family EEA permits to the UK! :(
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2010 #10
Must admit, I'd be a fan of introducing a rule that freedom of movement only applied to those who have obtained permanent residency in an EU country in which the spouse is a citizen. I wouldn't be shocked to find out that there was quite a few dodgy marriages going on!

One of the more strange things is that an Indian married to a Pole can freely move to the UK, but someone born on the Isle of Man isn't free to move to Poland!
OP djaramax 3 | 9
15 Jun 2010 #11
who are you ?
you are not owner in the EU.
if i have money, no worries i can go any where.
ok
I DO NOT FOR YOUR PERMISION...
internaldialog 4 | 145
15 Jun 2010 #12
djaramax

Grow up ... you have been told by many people in all threads but you still seem to have this disillusioned ideal that life in Poland is easy and that it is easy to penetrate to get easy ACCESS to the EU ... well news flash sunshine it isnt ... you need to do your homework more

1. IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH
2. if planning to live anywhere ABROAD -- get a JOB in your OWN country first and SAVE up money to SURVIVE on
3. LEARN THE LANGUAGE OF THE COUNTRY YOU WISH TO GO TO

and finally

stop being an ARSEHOLE!

many people are telling YOU THE FACTS AND THE TRUTH and you seemingly cant HANDLE BEING TOLD THIS!

I DO NOT FOR YOUR PERMISION...

no you will need POLAND's permission and you aint going to gain it that easily!

End of!!
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
15 Jun 2010 #13
if i have money, no worries i can go any where.

You don't though, because you'll need a part time job in Poland to survive.
cms 9 | 1,255
15 Jun 2010 #14
Out of interest I assume all you self appointed immigration police who claim to be well educated and to have things to offer here speak Polish and have a recognizable trade other than being English teachers ? Can you string a Polish sentance together apart from "Dworzec Centralny i nie ma taryfa dwa" ? And why does being black or white make a difference ?

In substance you are all right - its tough to get work here if you are from outside the EU, but to be so ****** when in fact the only advantages you have are that you by chance were born in the UK doesn't reflect well.
shush 1 | 212
15 Jun 2010 #15
And why does being black or white make a difference ?

No one said anything about being black or white or green. They were just being honest - a person who doesnt speak proper English, without the knowledge of Polish language and without money will not be able to survive in Poland on STUDENT visa. Add to that his girlfriend. And after all England is 2 hours by plane only and not 12 hours or more.
time means 5 | 1,310
15 Jun 2010 #16
you are all right

So what's your problem?
internaldialog 4 | 145
15 Jun 2010 #17
Out of interest I assume all you self appointed immigration

no we were trying to make the OP see sense something which he doesnt seem to get regarding his reasoning for going to Poland ....

He wanted to go into Poland to study on a STUDENT VISA without FUNDING and expected with very little English and NO KNOWLEDGE of the POLISH language to be able to FUNCTION SURVIVE and GAIN A VISA to study and in effect LIVE there

i'm sorry but did i miss something ...... !!!

It's clear the OP doesnt have the sufficent funding in place to SUPPORT HIMSELF nor HIS GIRLFRIEND he now intends to take to Poland with him

so before you critise maybe you should come off your high horse and see that we are offering advice and telling the OP

HOW IT ACTUALLY IS!!!!!

No it is not easy to live and survive in Poland NON EU or EU citizen for that matter .....

when in fact the only advantages you have are that you by chance were born in the UK doesn't reflect well.

Has nothing to do with that and further more Następnym razem, kiedy chcesz uzyskać mądry, nie próbuj mówić informację, że nie jest mądry
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
16 Jun 2010 #18
Out of interest I assume all you self appointed immigration police who claim to be well educated and to have things to offer here speak Polish and have a recognizable trade other than being English teachers ?

What relevance does it have as to what we are? We're all saying the same thing - that Poland has nothing to offer a Sri Lankan with a poor command of English and no knowledge of Polish. We're also telling him that he's not going to survive in Poland if he expects to bring his girlfriend here too - especially as he needs money to pay for living expenses.

And why does being black or white make a difference ?

Because those of a different skin colour are viewed as inferior, even by well educated Poles. Time and time again, I hear the opinion that a black person can't teach English - I know it's ********, but that's a commonly held view. Then - add in the fact that people view Indian subcontinental English as being terrible - and you have someone who is all but unemployable, especially as he doesn't even speak Polish.

In substance you are all right - its tough to get work here if you are from outside the EU, but to be so ****** when in fact the only advantages you have are that you by chance were born in the UK doesn't reflect well.

Sure, it's all by chance - but he would have far more success going to somewhere like the UK or Germany, where finding work among the Indian community is bound to be drastically easier. If he moves to Warsaw, he's just going to end up being used and abused.
BevK 11 | 248
16 Jun 2010 #19
You got me there cms, I am indeed an English teacher and my Polish still needs much improvement... but I am able to claim Polish citizenship by blood not for migration purposes.

There are other jobs but I don't know anyone (self included) who would be crazy enough to apply for a job here which they might do in the UK unless they have been transferred by a UK company because the wages are so terrible.

To the OP: people are trying to help you be realistic here. No it is not nice when people say negative things about your dream but Poland is not an easy place if you have no command of the language.
cms 9 | 1,255
16 Jun 2010 #20
The "just offering advice" line doesn't really ring true - between you lot you manage to call the guy an arsehole, poke fun at him because he cannot afford a plane ticket, tell him it might be different he if was white and well educated.

What's my problem in general ? This forum used to offer lots of advice to people who wanted to come here. I stepped off a plane here myself in 96 without a word of Polish and went through the same integration and work permit grief that all EU people from pre-2004 can remember. It seems now that all queries are slapped down immediately in the most churlish manner possible by people who are recent arrivals themselves and who actually also seem embittered that they are not able to get decent work here.
keen111 1 | 23
16 Jun 2010 #21
It is advice. And through reading this thread, I never read "if you were white and educated it would be different". In fact, there was only one comment, which was not directly saying that, but merely saying the view points of a lot of people who live in Poland...Whether it's right or wrong, they are view points people hold, and unfortunately, you will never change this of anyone, and therefore it will be harder for him if people think like this. Never was it said directly "if he is white, he will be ok".

People are all saying the same thing here, if you have no money, can't even speak English properly, how do you even expect to learn Polish correctly?

People are merely pointing out the bare facts....

cms..Also when you stepped off the plane, I am assuming your English was fluent, to enable you to learn Polish correctly? If you have the command for English, then you would be able to learn Polish from an English teacher for example. However, not having a proper command for English, kind of hinders you in learning Polish by an English speaking teacher for example? - Not sure of many people who are fluent in the Indian language, to enable correct learning of Polish in Poland?
cms 9 | 1,255
16 Jun 2010 #22
for people like us - white, educated and able to string a sentence together coherently, it's not *that* difficult a place to live

This is the sentance I was referring to. The inference is pretty clear, direct or not.

In fact there are plenty of successful Indians in Poland - my cousin is married to one who is very wealthy, another one has just completed a major PLN 1m piece of work for me with great success and professionalism. In the old days in the 90s when we used to have the Brits v Indians cricket games in Warsaw they were all richer and harder working than we were. But many of them started off as traders and importers.

In my general experience the Arab and African students who come here learn Polish far quicker than the English who tend not to stray too far from Jimmy Bradley's / Brogans / Irish Embassy and whatever the Gdansk and Wroclaw equivalents are.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
16 Jun 2010 #23
The "just offering advice" line doesn't really ring true -.

He is an arsehole if he ends up abusing people who tell him bluntly what the deal is. The fact that he can barely afford to come here tells you everything - he's just another one in a long line of Indian subcontinental people who end up destitute in Europe. I'm not sure why many of them are attempting to come to Poland - could it be because Poland is still ridiculously easy to gain access to?

In fact there are plenty of successful Indians in Poland.

Sure, no-one's denying that. But there are equally many living in poor conditions, having been promised milk and honey and instead getting nothing - me and dnz once met an Arab guy here who was here illegally, who was having to work for 5PLN an hour in a kebab shop because absolutely no-one would employ him.

Incidentally, you don't know any Indian importers who are capable of giving a straight answer to a straight question, do you?

I suspect that many of the successful ones here are the ones who came here with a purpose and vision, rather than just "EU VISA".
Harry
16 Jun 2010 #24
have a recognizable trade other than being English teachers ?

That would be me for one.

And why does being black or white make a difference ?

Because so many Poles are racists.

you by chance were born in the UK

I wasn't. I wasn't even born in the EU.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
16 Jun 2010 #25
Because so many Poles are racists.

Even to go a bit further - many of them are casually racist - they wouldn't make monkey noises at a black person, or make slanty eyes in front of a Chinese person - but they'll still view them as being inferior.

As I've said - Asians and Africans have a very low opinion in the minds of many Poles, regardless of their true ability. I know a particularly well educated person who refuses to do business with Asians for example, except the Japanese. And he's responsible for a budget of around 50 million zloty a year!
1jola 14 | 1,879
16 Jun 2010 #26
I know a particularly well educated person who refuses to do business with Asians for example, except the Japanese. And he's responsible for a budget of around 50 million zloty a year!

Unbelivable! You should write your mother about it.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
16 Jun 2010 #27
internaldialog

A bit grumpy today, are we?

:)

>^..^<

M-G (haec hactenus)
internaldialog 4 | 145
16 Jun 2010 #28
A bit grumpy today, are we?

narh I'm in a pleasant mood just trying to explain to the non coherent the facts which seemingly don't seem to be sinking in ... o_0 (rolls eyes)

:)
KasiaES
22 Jul 2010 #29
Oh dear...It's a pity I didn't come across this forum before, this is a very interesting conversation indeed. I don't know how many of you are Polish, but I am, and to this poor Indian guy I just want to say: Poland is not a good place for you. I have spent last 5 years in Ireland working directly with international student, actually looking after their admission. Their English is terrible, practically un-understandable, forget even the way they are swinging their heads while talking...it's so distracting and you just simply want to do the same! Anyhow...back to the topic. Truth is that nobody likes them in Ireland, nobody likes them in Spain (where I am living at the moment) and even more nobody likes them in Poland. I do agree Poles are racist...big time. But it's difficult not to be if your country only recently opened so gladly for internationals and for example for 30 years of your life you haven't even seen live somebody with different skin color. And suddenly they come and bring their (lack) of culture. Actually last weekend I've been out with some friends in the center of Barcelona and there is loads of Indians selling everything on the streets. In here they are called 'cervesamigo' - beerfriend, because they sell beers on the street after off license is closed. Anyhow, we have been asked at least 20 times during the night by a different Indians if we want to buy marijuana, cocaine or hashish. Just because their English is terrible, the same as Spanish for that matter, they can't get proper jobs so they sell drugs. I am afraid it's going to be the same in Poland. And I don't want that for my country...sorry if I'm politically incorrect, but no thank you, go away and never come back. In the other hand I have few friends who are native English speakers and they have spent some time in Poland teaching English...perfect. I love that, they come, they work, they pay their taxes like everybody else, they have the same culture and way of being. And to be honest if I want to learn any foreign language I want to learn it from native speaker. Otherwise you can't really get a good grasp of it. If you learn English in Poland you learn it from person who has the same accent as you, then you go abroad and you can't understand s*&^% from what people say. And if somebody wants to say that being a language teacher in other country is not a decent job...show me more decent.
ram lal lama
16 Aug 2011 #30
i come to Poland with my wife on the student visa also i am dependent visa . how chance dependent visa person work in Poland . then how many work in weekly hour in student . we are coming in January


Home / Law / Can I come to Poland with my girlfriend on the student visa as a dependent?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.