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Cash loan in Poland without PESEL


CMRC
12 Jun 2015 #1
Hi, I'm currently working in Poland for almost half a year and I have a no term contract with my company. They say I don't need a PESEL and that the Karta Pobytu thing is also not required. Due to professional reasons I have to buy some stuff and that costs about 5-6000pln, I make 4k gross plus bonuses. Can I get a loan from any bank? Wich papers are needed? Thanks
terri 1 | 1,665
12 Jun 2015 #2
If you go to a bank and ask - you will have the answer.
How can we pressume what they banks will say?
jon357 67 | 16,919
12 Jun 2015 #3
Terri's right. Only a bank can tell you.

Just a guess, but I suspect they'd say no, due to the risk of you vanishing off home with the bank's money. A better bet might be to apply for a credit card in your home country (depends of course where that is) and do it that way.

DO NOT touch private loan companies like Provident Polska etc. Using them is a bad idea.
Czarek81 - | 8
12 Jun 2015 #4
And I would suggest to try to get a loan in Provident - in my opinion it's the only way to borrow money in your situation. Do you have a bank account in Polish?
jon357 67 | 16,919
12 Jun 2015 #5
try to get a loan in Provident

A very bad thing to do. The criticism of them (and the techniques of their 'agents') is very justified.
Czarek81 - | 8
12 Jun 2015 #6
I fully agree with you but probably it's the only way to borrow some money...
jon357 67 | 16,919
12 Jun 2015 #7
Not quite the only - especially if he has access to credit in his home country. He should explore every alternative before considering that one.
Czarek81 - | 8
12 Jun 2015 #8
I mean t's the only way to borrow some money in Poland.
jon357 67 | 16,919
12 Jun 2015 #9
You're right that his choices are limited. A better way would be for him to register as resident (he does work here after all) and get a credit card. Also, a loan from a friend or an advance payment for work are possibilities. Much better than using a semi-legal loan shark.
Czarek81 - | 8
12 Jun 2015 #10
CMRC also try to ask in CitiBank. Their website is all in English, call centre speaks English -
online.citibank.pl/english/contact/Kontakt.htm
jon357 67 | 16,919
12 Jun 2015 #11
This is a good suggestion. Thinking about it though, they'd probably expect him to be registered as resident. And on reflection, even Provident Polska probably would expect that and a PESEL too.
Gosc123456
12 Jun 2015 #12
I seriously doubt it. Without a permanent resident status, it is impossible to get credit. Of course one can borrow money from those "companies" advising on trees and on bus stops but not the best idea. Before I had permanent residence status, I could even get a phone "abonament".

It may be tough but it makes sense. No bank wants to take risks.

I know one can dream but the reality is often rough ;)
jon357 67 | 16,919
12 Jun 2015 #13
Of course one can borrow money from those "companies" advising on trees and on bus stops but not the best idea

A dreadful idea even - and of course most of those would require a PESEL and/or a guarantor. The OP would do well to look at raising the money in his home country.
Gosc123456
12 Jun 2015 #14
@Jon: of course, very bad idea.

If the guy is no resident of Poland and has been here for only 6 months, there is no bank in Poland that would be willing to lend him money. I am completely amazed that he cannot even understand it ;).
OP CMRC
12 Jun 2015 #15
I have a friend who is also not Polish and he got a loan in the same situation, I am an EU citizen, I don't want a huge amount, just some 4-5k... And my income is of 4k gross + variable bonus up to 1.2k. Needless to say that I do have a bank account in pln...
Polsyr 6 | 769
12 Jun 2015 #16
Did you try to ask the bank where you have an account already - if your salary is paid to your account? Otherwise, since you have been working in Poland for several months, why don't you register your place of residence (zameldowanie) and obtain a PESEL number? It could ease a lot of things for you in Poland.

@gosc: I could not even open a personal bank account until I had both a residence card AND a PESEL (with ING Bank).
Gosc123456
13 Jun 2015 #17
@Polsyr: at the time I had both PESEL and was a joint- property owner.

Now, I (still have PESEL), own property and have the permanent residence status and inspite of a good and regular income, I was turned down SMALL credit twice. I was of course furious ;).

No bank shall lend money in situations as in the OP's. The proof he cannot get credit, he has to post in PF ;). Pure common sense! No bank wants to take risks in lending to foreigners who might leave the country any time and overnight. Also need to consider what country OP comes from. Sorry to rub it in once more, but Poland is not an open (and hence a tolerant) country so some nationalities shall have more problmes than others. Someone from let's say Nepal shall have a harder time (the answer shall be obviously "no") than someone from Luxemburg ;).

As to residence status, I don't know how one can live easily in Poland in the long term without it. I'm asked for my residence card and for my PESEL all the time. It is normal that a foreigner who has neither PESEL nor residence card does not get benefits granted to nationals and résidents. It is so everywhere so why in Poland should they grant credits and other benefits to those in the country on a temporary basis? This forum is full of teenagers and alike so they don't know much about real life... ;)

@CMRC: please understand that you are a big risk since not settled in Poland. You have been here for so too small a period of time, have neither PESEL nor residence permit and you are likely (I am not saying you will but you have more chances to leave Poland than Poles or permanent residents ;)) to move out of Poland overnight at any time and obviously no bank can take risks. This is not a Polish problem since it's this way everywhere because it is logical. If a "friend" of yours got money in "your" situation (why do you need to post in PF instead of doing like your "friend" ?) he had either a most lenient bank clerk who did not follow bank rules or the socalled "friend" has offered strong guarantees and he's probably from another nationality. Where do you come from? I mean what is your origin? You should know that if you are from a "weird" country, it'll be even harder. No bank wants to take the risk that you take their money and disappear in Paskistan or in Paraguay ;). Either your 'friend" lied or his situation is different from yours.

Like someone said, try to borrow from your home country or from private people who know very well as banks shall not take risks. Also no need to ask banks with whom you don't have accounts.

I know, there are a lot of dreamers in PF but one needs to face reality.
JollyRomek 7 | 481
13 Jun 2015 #18
Pure common sense! No bank wants to take risks in lending to foreigners who might leave the country any time and overnight

Do you sometimes think before you post?

So what if the foreigner has registered his stay in Poland and has a PESEL number? Does the PESEL number physically stop him / her from leaving the country after getting a loan or maxing out a credit card? I guess not, agree?

The reason why banks require the PESEL is to perform their credit checks. It has nothing to do with "trusting the foreigner".

Needless to say that I do have a bank account in pln...

Get your PESEL sorted and apply for a credit card, loan or overdraft with the bank you get your salary paid into. With a salary of 4k gross you should not expect them to issue you with a platinum visa card but it should be enough to get the 4 - 5k PLN you are looking for.
Gosc123456
13 Jun 2015 #19
@Jolly: obviously there is no guarantee that foreigners (just like Poles ;)) living in Poland shall not leave Poland before reimbursing but any bank would favor foreigners established in the country over foreigners just arriving. Pure common sense!

Try to borrow money from a bank in a country where you don't have permanent resident and you'll come to tell us ;)
JollyRomek 7 | 481
13 Jun 2015 #20
Try to borrow money from a bank in a country where you don't have permanent resident and you'll come to tell us ;)

I did not say that it is possible to do so.

However, your argument was that a bank would not lend money to a foreigner who might leave the country overnight. That can happen with any foreigner even if that person has permanent residency and been living in Poland for a number of years.
Gosc123456
13 Jun 2015 #21
@Jolly: did you understand what I wrote? I experienced it too twice recently, inspite of permanent residence, real estate owner and good + steady income but what I am saying when foreigners are concerned, someone new in the country, with no residence (easier to get out than when they have a life in Poland with obligations;)), no financial history in the country, has 0% chance.

Even Poles can leave Poland or people can die before they reimburse ;) but in no case, someone new in the country shall be offered credit. It does not exist in Poland and it does not exist anywhere else...

Instead of "playing with me", tell us how a foreigner new in Poland can get credit from a bank in Poland. This is the key question ;)
JollyRomek 7 | 481
13 Jun 2015 #22
By having a PESEL and his salary paid into his bank account for three month. Having no financial history in Poland is better than having a negative credit rating. Everyone has to start somewhere, right?

I have applied for a credit card three month after I arrived in Lodz and it was not even with the bank i got my salary paid to (because mt bank did not have English internet banking). Absolutely no problem. But, you need to have PESEL.
Gosc123456
13 Jun 2015 #23
@Jolly: getting a credit card is completely different. I had some with several banks while still on temporary residence (but married to Pole). Being offered a credit is completely different and sorry but banks are no Santa Claus they don't lend to people from abroad working in Poland for 3 months and having neither PESEL nor residence card.

Since you know better, tell the OP how to get credit in Poland since it is so easy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ;)
JollyRomek 7 | 481
13 Jun 2015 #24
Can you please explain to me how it is different to offer somebody a credit card i.e. a credit facility to offering someone a loan i.e. a credit facility?
Gosc123456
13 Jun 2015 #25
@Jolly: banks issue "debitowa" cards, with limited withdrawals (per week...), the amount of which are directly deducted from bank accounts so no risk for the banks (if no money or not enough money in the account, the card is refused ;)). The OP expects several thousands of ZL (5 or 6) when he has a 4,000 gross salary. If you know a bank in Poland that can help, just let hear it ;).
JollyRomek 7 | 481
13 Jun 2015 #26
"debitowa" cards

I am not talking about Debit Cards. I am talking about Credit Cards. That's two different things. And yes, banks issue credit cards (also to foreigners) and hence grant a credit facility if the applicant has had three consecutive salaries and not a bad credit rating.

The fact that you confuse debit cards with credit cards is a clear indication that you may not really know what you are talking about.
Wroclaw Boy
13 Jun 2015 #27
tell us how a foreigner new in Poland can get credit from a bank in Poland

A couple of 50,000 PLN deposits usually does the trick We live in a society where money talks.

Banks will offer you an umbrella when its not raining but take it away when it does.
DominicB - | 2,709
13 Jun 2015 #28
We live in a society where money talks.

This expression has always had me scratching my head. Can you provide examples of societies where money (or wealth) does not talk? Other than monasteries (and even then)?
Gosc123456
13 Jun 2015 #29
@Jolly: I know the difference and I can tell you that most cards in Poland are "debitowa". If you think it is so easy for foreigners, just tell the OP where to go and how to do it! I "love" those pretending all is easy but they never tell us what to do.

@Wroclaw: the guy makes 4,000 gross and wants 5/6,000 ;)

In no country, a foreigner new in the place can get credit.

Also, especially in societies not open, as Poland is, it is obvious that it"ll be much harder (in banks and elsewhere) for someone from let's say Nepal or India than someone from let's say Luxemburg or Holland ;). I seriously doubt a guy just new in Poland, on top of that coming from Pakistan, Egypt or India getting credit ;). If you know such open minded and generous banks, you have to share the info to all of us ;)
JollyRomek 7 | 481
13 Jun 2015 #30
Jolly: I know the difference and I can tell you that most cards in Poland are "debitowa".

No, it seems that you do not know the difference between a credit card and a debit card otherwise you would not have brought up the example of a "karta debitowa" when I was clearly talking about credit cards.

I "love" those pretending all is easy but they never tell us what to do.

I have already given you the example of myself in post 23. Somehow you have successfully ignored that example.


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