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Permanent Residence in Polska: procedures, list of documents, etc.


Buggsy Activity: 8 / 87
Joined: 25 Oct 2010 ♂
 
25 Oct 2010  #1

I'm starting this thread to help people who come on here looking for help on this subject. I have lived here long enough to know that PF is probably one of the most informative websites for foreigners living in Poland. I'd rather be here than on some website that has 10 or so members who're not even active.

So my appeal is this i would like to hear from people who have applied for permanent residence EU and None Eu, Polish Spouses and None Polish Spouses, Business people and Student's alike. I'm very much interested in the procedure, the list of documents you had to provide and which city you applied from. I hear it's different from city to city but for so many people this is a very daunting task, as they say forewarned is forearmed.

I hope you guys will do your best contributing towards this thread. On behalf of myself and my colleagues looking for similar information. Thank you

Spaceman77 Activity: 3 / 58
Joined: 12 Sep 2009 ♂
 
25 Oct 2010  #2

I second that. I really need to know how can my wife apply. I just became a new Polish citizen and after learning polish good enough, we want to move to Poland. My general question is that: If she is married to me (We've been married for 12 years now and have three kids), can we live for one year or 2 in Portugal first? Will her polish residence card allow her to do that? Or does she need to live in Poland for 5 years and then become a citizen in order to live and work in another member state? Any guideance will be greatly appreciated.
delphiandomine Activity: 56 / 15,047
Joined: 25 Nov 2008 ♂
 
25 Oct 2010  #3

If she is married to me (We've been married for 12 years now and have three kids), can we live for one year or 2 in Portugal first?

No, you have to apply for residency in Portugal on the basis of being married to an EU citizen. You can do it easily, as it's a fundamental EU right.
Spaceman77 Activity: 3 / 58
Joined: 12 Sep 2009 ♂
 
26 Oct 2010  #4

Thanks for the reply and for what I consider to be great news! This change things a lot as far as planning.
al111 Activity: 12 / 89
Joined: 2 Sep 2009 ♂
 
26 Oct 2010  #5

Great post this one is, just wish they were more people with different experiences who could contribute....
delphiandomine Activity: 56 / 15,047
Joined: 25 Nov 2008 ♂
 
26 Oct 2010  #6

The experience is pretty uniform - it's all set out in law, so apart from some funny local things such as being allowed to laminate the document - nothing changes really. But it's different where non-EU citizens are concerned, due it being subjective.
al111 Activity: 12 / 89
Joined: 2 Sep 2009 ♂
 
26 Oct 2010  #7

But it's different where non-EU citizens are concerned, due it being subjective.

Good observation Delphiandomine how different is it i'm sure we would all like to hear on this one, if i'm not mistaken that's what the OP is asking for....

To spaceman77 how did u acquire your citizenship are u Originally EU or non-EU?
Spaceman77 Activity: 3 / 58
Joined: 12 Sep 2009 ♂
 
28 Oct 2010  #8

To spaceman77 how did u acquire your citizenship are u Originally EU or non-EU?

My grandparents emigrated to Venezuela long ago and when they became Venezuelan citizens, they apparently lost their polish citizenship.
It was up to my father and a very clever attorney in Krakow to find the glitch (on our favor) that changed things around.
As it turns out, Polish men that became citizens of other countries during that time (Sorry I don't recall the exact years), lost their polish citizenship. But if they have not joined the military in that country or held any government position or have not asked the polish army for permission to become a citizen in that country then they are to be considered Polish to the eyes of the law.

It took two years to prove that my grandfather didn't join the army in Venezuela. It was a very hard process for my father, but he made it. I believe that using an attorney in Poland was key. Otherwise, the process could last a long longer or even worst, it could have been denied.

Once my father received his Polish confirmation, it only took one month and half for me to get mine.
I'm now in the process of confirming my three kids.
My brother who is the son of the same father and the same mother, got his polish confirmation denied due to a technicality. (My dad didn't register his birth certificate until after one year of his birth). The attorneys are now trying to get the president to grant his polish citizenship (I hope it's possible).

Right now, I'm studying polish 1 hour a day and I love it.
My main goal and dream is to live in Poland near my aunt and other family members. Of course, with my wife and kids, but we wanted to visit Portugal for 1 year or 2 first.

I'm very thankful to the comments and advise that I can find at this forum.
deni1311 Activity: - / 1
Joined: 23 Dec 2010 ♀
 
23 Dec 2010  #9

Hi!
I am new here....
I am from Argentina, and would love to study in poland... I dont know what kind of permit I need to do that?? I dont even know if I can do that... And if I eventually want to live there,,, is that possible, not being from EU???
OP Buggsy Activity: 8 / 87
Joined: 25 Oct 2010 ♂
 
7 Apr 2011  #10

One more thing which is not clear is about the Police Clearance Certificate, will they ask for one from the country of origin(coz i'm told you can obtain one here in polska if you've been residing for 3years). My mate has an old one which he got in 2006 when he started living in England. He lived there until he came to Poland in 2008 he has only visited his country of origin for 3month with in the 5years he has been abroad and the authorities there require him to have lived in the country more than six months to get another Police Clearance. Anybody with experience on this??

Thank you.
wildrover Activity: 98 / 4,461
Joined: 7 Jun 2007 ♂
 
7 Apr 2011  #11

Police Clearance Certificate,

Is that a document to say you have not been in any trouble with the Policja....i might need to get one of those in Poland before i move to Russia in order to apply for residency there...

where do i get one , and how much....?
OP Buggsy Activity: 8 / 87
Joined: 25 Oct 2010 ♂
 
7 Apr 2011  #12

Is that a document to say you have not been in any trouble with the Policja

Yup, thats the one Rover, from what i'm told the procedure is quite simple but don't know about the costs though. You better do it while you're still in Polska. You should have your residence card together with your passport just incase, letter from your registry office to say you have been residing at that particular address for that period of time.This should be done by the local or regional police i'm not sure but u'll have to have your prints taken and they will tell you when it will be ready. Still wondering about my mate though

My mate has an old one which he got in 2006 when he started living in England.

rorynairn Activity: 1 / 12
Joined: 9 Aug 2011 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #13

Merged: Permanent residence card

i have just moved poland i am interested in staying longer than 3 months and i have been told that i have to get a permanent residence card before i can get health insurance, if this is true how do i get a permanent residence card??

thanks Rory
grubas Activity: 12 / 1,396
Joined: 1 Feb 2010 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #14

And what's your citizenship?
rorynairn Activity: 1 / 12
Joined: 9 Aug 2011 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #15

british
pip Activity: 11 / 1,662
Joined: 4 Jul 2011 ♀
 
9 Aug 2011  #16

you have to get a temporary residency card first. then from this point you can apply for permanent. (in a nutshell)
JonnyM Activity: 12 / 2,634
Joined: 9 Mar 2011 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #17

i have just moved poland i am interested in staying longer than 3 months and i have been told that i have to get a permanent residence card before i can get health insurance, if this is true how do i get a permanent residence card??

No. The permanent and temporary cards are for non-EU residents. As an EU citizen you can register with a 'Karta Obywatelstwo' but you might find that the health insurance isn't any cheaper than private insurance and the quality of service far lower. You can also stay as long as you like.
grubas Activity: 12 / 1,396
Joined: 1 Feb 2010 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #18

'Karta Obywatelstwo' but you might find that the health insurance isn't any cheaper than private insurance and the quality of service far lower.

What's "Karta Obywatelstwo"???Never heard of that.And he doesn't have to pay for state health insurance,well at least not directly.
rorynairn Activity: 1 / 12
Joined: 9 Aug 2011 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #19

im British and im not a student either
JonnyM Activity: 12 / 2,634
Joined: 9 Mar 2011 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #20

What's "Karta Obywatelstwo"???Never heard of that

They didn't have it when you lived here. After EU acession it replaced the Karta Pobytu Tymczasowa for citizens of EU countries.

And he doesn't have to pay for state health insurance,well at least not directly.

He has to pay ZUS if he wants state coverage and is living in PL.

rorynairn
Which city are you in?
rorynairn Activity: 1 / 12
Joined: 9 Aug 2011 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #21

Poznan
JonnyM Activity: 12 / 2,634
Joined: 9 Mar 2011 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #22

I'll PM you.

edit

but you'll have to unblock your settings first.
delphiandomine Activity: 56 / 15,047
Joined: 25 Nov 2008 ♂
 
9 Aug 2011  #23

Poznan

There's no need to have a residence permit - all you have to do is pay ZUS somehow.

It can be via a private contribution (around 220zl a month), via ZUS contributions paid at work, or via self employment.

Your residence status has no bearing on the ability to receive healthcare.
unique_username  
10 Aug 2011  #24

since when is ZUS 220zl a month? I'm self employed and I pay all 3 parts of it. 523+233+46=802zl EVERY MONTH!!! Just on this reason alone, I am leaving Pl for good at the end of this month.

There is no way to get around ZUS in this country after you finish all your schooling.

There is no way to live in this country and save something for the future. 2,000,000 Poles are the ones who figured it out and have left for greener pastures.

Also.... when you say "there's no need for a residence permit" who (nationality) are you refering to exactly?

Have you ever heard of the "zameldowanie"?

How about the "Karta Pobytu/Zamieszkanie na czs oznaczony" card?

How about the application for residency where the applicant must provide:
payment records for the tax office,
payment record for ZUS,
new zameldowanie for 90 days during the application processing time,
KRS/REGON/NIP papers,
act Notarlny for your business,
passport copies,
6 pictures,
home rental contract, or ownership documentation.
proof the owner of your rented home is the legal owner and has permission to rent,
business premises contract,
year end financial reports from your book-keeper,
contract with your book-keeper,
birth certificate translated by a sworn translator
Income and stability reports from your book-keeper.
ITD
delphiandomine Activity: 56 / 15,047
Joined: 25 Nov 2008 ♂
 
11 Aug 2011  #25

since when is ZUS 220zl a month?

To have health care on a voluntary basis, it's about 220zl a month. Perhaps it would be better to say that "NFZ cover is available for 220zl a month".

I'm self employed and I pay all 3 parts of it. 523+233+46=802zl EVERY MONTH!!!

Self employment contributions have nothing to do with the cost of health care, except the 223zl.

There is no way to get around ZUS in this country after you finish all your schooling.

No way to get around ZUS? Since when?

No way to live in this country? Of course there is - perhaps not as an English teacher working for other people, but there certainly is.

I know plenty of people living here who are saving quite a bit of cash.

Also.... when you say "there's no need for a residence permit" who (nationality) are you refering to exactly?

Read the thread. The guy is British - hence - no need for a residence permit. Likewise for the vast majority of Europeans.

Have you ever heard of the "zameldowanie"?

Of course. No EU/EEA/CH citizen has ever been prosecuted for not having it.

How about the "Karta Pobytu/Zamieszkanie na czs oznaczony" card?

An irrelevance for EU/EEA/CH citizens - of which the OP is one.

How about the application for residency where the applicant must provide:

Most of that isn't included in law and can be safely ignored by anyone with an ounce of common sense.

Some of it is also illogical and almost certainly the result of bad advice/blind obeying of some dragon in the Urzad who should be slapped with the relevant laws.

But then again, it's a good way to keep non-EU citizens out. We have enough workers in the EU - we don't need non-EU citizens in here.
wielki pan Activity: 2 / 250
Joined: 7 Jan 2011 ♂
 
11 Aug 2011  #26

To have health care on a voluntary basis, it's about 220zl a month. Perhaps it would be better to say that "NFZ cover is available for 220zl a month".

Mr D once again where do you come across a figure of 220zl a month for private insurance???
delphiandomine Activity: 56 / 15,047
Joined: 25 Nov 2008 ♂
 
11 Aug 2011  #27

Sigh.
NFZ = Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia.
No-one mentioned private insurance. Perhaps you should learn a bit more about Poland and what the NFZ system is?
pip Activity: 11 / 1,662
Joined: 4 Jul 2011 ♀
 
11 Aug 2011  #28

But then again, it's a good way to keep non-EU citizens out. We have enough workers in the EU - we don't need non-EU citizens in here.

I am a non EU citizen. I own my own business and I am a permanent resident. Do I get to stay? or will you have me deported?
Wroclaw Boy  
11 Aug 2011  #29

Youre an American arent you pip? what nationality is your husband if you dont mind me asking?
pip Activity: 11 / 1,662
Joined: 4 Jul 2011 ♀
 
11 Aug 2011  #30

no, I am Canadian. My husband is Polish with dual citizenship, our kids also have dual citizenship. My inlaws live in Canada and also have dual citizenship- as does my brother in law and his wife.

(too much info maybe)




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Permanent Residence in Polska: procedures, list of documents, etc.
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